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Okay, so, I've been working selling various products on Ebay since 2011. I'm a 21 y/o girl. I'm genuinely very ambitious, hard-working, and pragmatic.... But I've never had a proper job.

But the ebay business has taught me so much! I'm a top seller with a 99% rating. I even learned to drive and got my license so I could transport the stock to ship from my house. Basically, I started off with one contact selling Ugg boots, he got them for cheap from China. I (or my parents) paid for the postage and packaging (which was set a certain price since we were only selling to the UK) which was a lot. I also set up the account, did the advertisements, paid the fees, dealt with the customers, organised the stock etc. etc. We failed a lot. Our Uggs were too expensive since we had to be able to split the profits in the end, even though they were so much cheaper than retail value. People were also convinced our Uggs were fake and kept returning them. It was a flop.

So, I said I'd pay for the stock from now on if he'd hook me up with one of his contacts. I started buying whatever I could with what I made from the Uggs, mostly tidbits of clothing I knew would sell and then I moved onto laptops and phones and now camera equipment. I make a bloody fortune when I made my own calls. I was doing all the work for the guy anyway, but now I'm taking all the profits for myself. But I can't do this forever. I want to be a filmmaker. But, nobody seems to give me credit where credit's due. Nobody respects my job. Even McDonald's rejected me when I went looking for a "proper" job! I've been putting my CV out everywhere, I've been rejected by apprenticeships and internships to work on film sets and I figure it's because my work experience isn't being taken seriously!

WTF am I supposed to do?
 

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Auntie Duckie
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I make a bloody fortune when I made my own calls. I was doing all the work for the guy anyway, but now I'm taking all the profits for myself. But I can't do this forever. I want to be a filmmaker.
Do you have a University degree in Film making?

If not, it would seem that you could make money playing the eBay game while in school and hopefully get an internship or two while you were in a University?

With your University contacts you could then network your interest and skills with like-minded people.

Alternately, make a documentary about your eBay business and put it on Youtube. Then, you use your ongoing Youtube documentary as your video resume.

Plus, if you are talented and get followers on Youtube you will eventually earn advertisement money.

Worst case, you made money selling things on eBay and can also add some fillmmaking experience on your resume? If you go the University route, you'll have a degree which puts you ahead of the job seekers who don't have a degree.



-ZDD
 

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Maybe take a certificate or diploma business course, so you have something to back up your ebay selling.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys for the advice, but I just want a part-time job in retail or something. A Summer job. Literally that's all. So there's something on my CV that says I'm good enough for an apprenticeship or internship. But in Ireland as far as everyone's concerned I've never even had a job at 21 and I'm not even good enough for that.

I have 2 years of college done and I've learned so much about cameras and even more from selling equipment. I've already made two documentaries and I definitely don't want to fall into the whole youtube thing, unless it's to make a quality web-series or promotional videos to get funding for a feature length film. Right now, since I don't want to do any more college, all I want to do in the next two years is get work experience. I'm not worried about my longterm career yet, more worried about a job, more worried about people not seeing my Ebay business as legitimate and wondering where to go from here to get an apprenticeship to learn cinematography.

I'm sorry but work experience means far more to me than a degree. The quality of what I've learned the past two years and the work I put into learning it and even the show reel I have is enough for me right now. I just want to start getting my foot in there at this stage.
 

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I would just keep at it and don't worry about lack of credentials. That will only keep you awake at night.

In my job hunt, I did 80 applications, and I had people telling me, "Your probably not qualified."

It would have been easy to give-in to fear and get discouraged like I used to, but I didn't because I knew God had a job for me.

My point is, just keep at it and don't worry. Successful people are those who did not give up, just like your business taught you. In the beginning, it seemed things were not going your way. Yet, you kept at it and turned failure into success.

You just have to take the same approach to job-hunting.
 

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Something a degree in an unsuitable subject (realised too late) taught me is that one has to pull out their own strengths and experiential learning, for example you noted logistics experience, customer service skills, conflict resolution, maintaining supplier lists, finance and budgeting and the ability to remain resilient when 'failure seems imminent.'

(Sell the positives more but also be realistic when your skill set is fairly unique making you both under and over qualified.)

To be honest what you note sounds like a common case of shoehorning when your skills could be targeted towards marketing, merchandising, bidding and acquisitions and trading with many now owing their their own career brand with titles such as trader-film maker until one or both titles finds the other enough to create a career worthy of your needs.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Something a degree in an unsuitable subject (realised too late) taught me is that one has to pull out their own strengths and experiential learning, for example you noted logistics experience, customer service skills, conflict resolution, maintaining supplier lists, finance and budgeting and the ability to remain resilient when 'failure seems imminent.'

(Sell the positives more but also be realistic when your skill set is fairly unique making you both under and over qualified.)

To be honest what you note sounds like a common case of shoehorning when your skills could be targeted towards marketing, merchandising, bidding and acquisitions and trading with many now owing their their own career brand with titles such as trader-film maker until one or both titles finds the other enough to create a career worthy of your needs.
That's such bullshit. I'm only 21. Just because I did this to pay for college doesn't mean I'm stuck doing this. If a young adult worked in retail to go to college nobody would tell them to eventually become a fashion designer if they have a degree in psychology.
 

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WTF am I supposed to do?
First, you have to recognize that it's a tough economy out there, and you're up against a lot of competition for pretty much any job you apply for, no matter how menial it may be. I know people with advanced degrees who are working in call centers and other similar jobs just because they can't catch a break. So, that being said, your frequent rejections may have nothing to do with your ebay business whatsoever.

Now, as for my advice: lie on your applications. This may seem controversial, unethical, or whatever, but it's what you have to do. Resumes and job interviews are all about controlling information, and they need to be tailored to the job for which you're applying.

Using McDonald's as an example... they don't need to know every facet of your education and work history. You just need to be the lowest common denominator of what they're looking for. The fast food industry has a notoriously high turnover rate, so when they are hiring new people, they try to minimize that by hiring people who look like they have no other prospects so that they won't work there for like a month and then leave as soon as they get a better offer. So, don't make it obvious that you're only looking for a temporary position... you're the only one who needs to know that.

Additionally, the salient point of your ebay business is that you have sales experience. Lie and say it was a retail shop... these places pretty much never check references. You have the experience, so who gives a shit whether where you obtained that experience is accurate?
 

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If you don't have pertinent work experience, you can draw out skills you have from your eBay experience and highlight the things that are relevant at your potential job.

If you're using eBay to discuss McDonalds, highlight customer service skills (both verbal and oral), accurately maintaining monetary transactions, etc.

As someone said, you might have to fabricate something if you're going out of your field. If you're doing film, can you mention being a photographer, artist (something visual like painting), or assistant to anything else? If you happen to make something up, just make sure you can back it up if they ask.
 

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Uhh, maybe you fail to see things in perpective. Like I hear you, you are good at selling and have aspiration of being your own boss.
Go take some business course, learn what you need to know about finances and managing a business and go for it. Skip that crappy rat race everyone is supposed to take.

You're young, go for it. You aint going to get much respect for being on a payroll, the most respect is preserved for those that create businesses. Make a name, make money; show that you are someone that can lead, has vision and can stand on her own feet.

You'll see once you adapt that mentally and work with it, opportunity to make, write, cast or direct a movie will come along. All kinds of opportunities will come along; most you won't care about, but some you will.

A "proper job" is one that makes the money you need on a legal and ethical way. Don't listen to the sheep but think out of the box. The world is your playground, so to speak.
Now, still reading? go think and do!
 

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Have you elaborated on your eBay experience on your CV? I would try to point out the positives.

Something like
May 2011-Current
Owned and operated a successful online marketing and distribution business, shipping more than $ of product
- Negotiated with vendors to ensure a high margin on product
- Coordinated packing and shipping efforts
- Handled all marketing and advertising
- Managed accounts receivable and payable
- Managed customer relations
- Maintained a 99% customer satisfaction rating

Be prepared to back this up with documentation such as printouts of summary pages in eBay.

I'd also apply everywhere you can, it's common to have to apply in a lot of spots before finding a position, especially without any experience that they can get a reference on.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Have you elaborated on your eBay experience on your CV? I would try to point out the positives.

Something like
May 2011-Current
Owned and operated a successful online marketing and distribution business, shipping more than $ of product
- Negotiated with vendors to ensure a high margin on product
- Coordinated packing and shipping efforts
- Handled all marketing and advertising
- Managed accounts receivable and payable
- Managed customer relations
- Maintained a 99% customer satisfaction rating

Be prepared to back this up with documentation such as printouts of summary pages in eBay.

I'd also apply everywhere you can, it's common to have to apply in a lot of spots before finding a position, especially without any experience that they can get a reference on.
Put this in my CV.

Have an interview tomorrow. YOU DA BEST.
 

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Bluekitdon's advice was spot-on. Good luck at your interview!

It is a hard economy. It's more likely you'll get turned down than not based on sheer volume of people applying. Something important I've learned from my current job is that employers filling low-level positions are sometimes careful not to hire people who look like they will leave because they have too much in terms of credentials. So you want to be a little careful and omit things they don't necessarily need to know. I went into great depth with my work and volunteer experience on my last application, for example, because it's for a more hands-on therapy job, but I left off much of my academic work. Whereas when I applied for a job at a university, I omitted my retail work experience and blew the page up with my academic accomplishments.

I would not say lie on your applications - that can bite you very painfully in the ass - but always tailor your experience to what you are applying for. If you were, for example, applying to a customer service job, you could stress the customer service aspects of what you did on eBay.

Also - unless it's a regional thing (I'm in the US, not sure if this differs in other countries) or the employer is specifically asking for it, I would probably go with calling it your "resume" instead of your "CV". CV is typically for more academically-oriented positions, for people with extensive academic presentations, publications, research, and so on. You may want to create both, especially if you continue to develop a film portfolio, but for summer jobs I think resume is more likely to be appropriate. :)
 

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Something important I've learned from my current job is that employers filling low-level positions are sometimes careful not to hire people who look like they will leave because they have too much in terms of credentials.
It's kind of funny with those low level sort of jobs because even if someone of quality did leave after a while, they'd probably do a better job than half the jokers they seem to hire. I have some friends who do low level sort of jobs and basically people's work ethic is horrible. They'd be better off hiring someone, having them do a good job for a while, then when they move on, find someone else as opposed to hiring some idiot who doesn't do a good job and then they're back to square one when they have to fire that person.
 

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Mastodon Hunter
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Okay, so, I've been working selling various products on Ebay since 2011. I'm a 21 y/o girl. I'm genuinely very ambitious, hard-working, and pragmatic.... But I've never had a proper job.

But the ebay business has taught me so much! I'm a top seller with a 99% rating. I even learned to drive and got my license so I could transport the stock to ship from my house. Basically, I started off with one contact selling Ugg boots, he got them for cheap from China. I (or my parents) paid for the postage and packaging (which was set a certain price since we were only selling to the UK) which was a lot. I also set up the account, did the advertisements, paid the fees, dealt with the customers, organised the stock etc. etc. We failed a lot. Our Uggs were too expensive since we had to be able to split the profits in the end, even though they were so much cheaper than retail value. People were also convinced our Uggs were fake and kept returning them. It was a flop.

So, I said I'd pay for the stock from now on if he'd hook me up with one of his contacts. I started buying whatever I could with what I made from the Uggs, mostly tidbits of clothing I knew would sell and then I moved onto laptops and phones and now camera equipment. I make a bloody fortune when I made my own calls. I was doing all the work for the guy anyway, but now I'm taking all the profits for myself. But I can't do this forever. I want to be a filmmaker. But, nobody seems to give me credit where credit's due. Nobody respects my job. Even McDonald's rejected me when I went looking for a "proper" job! I've been putting my CV out everywhere, I've been rejected by apprenticeships and internships to work on film sets and I figure it's because my work experience isn't being taken seriously!

WTF am I supposed to do?

It may not be so much that they don't take it seriously, and more like they think you may be good at it, but it is unrelated to what you're applying for. I know plenty of very successful people who have started out on eBay and had it in their CV's/Resumes... If you are going to have eBay on your CV, try going for more "respectable" jobs in sales and/or advertisement. It's a small leap from where you are, but it could prove very useful later on once you go for the film industry.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It may not be so much that they don't take it seriously, and more like they think you may be good at it, but it is unrelated to what you're applying for. I know plenty of very successful people who have started out on eBay and had it in their CV's/Resumes... If you are going to have eBay on your CV, try going for more "respectable" jobs in sales and/or advertisement. It's a small leap from where you are, but it could prove very useful later on once you go for the film industry.
I don't understand the stigma here, what's wrong with being an Ebay seller in the first place? I made way more than I'll ever make at my age in any job I take on.

Also, I don't have relevant work experience in retail/cashier/deli jobs, does that really make it unachievable to me? It's only minimum wage we're talking about. I feel like if I can't get that sort of job, I shouldn't be applying for sales/advertising jobs, you know?

Bluekitdon's advice was spot-on. Good luck at your interview!

It is a hard economy. It's more likely you'll get turned down than not based on sheer volume of people applying. Something important I've learned from my current job is that employers filling low-level positions are sometimes careful not to hire people who look like they will leave because they have too much in terms of credentials. So you want to be a little careful and omit things they don't necessarily need to know. I went into great depth with my work and volunteer experience on my last application, for example, because it's for a more hands-on therapy job, but I left off much of my academic work. Whereas when I applied for a job at a university, I omitted my retail work experience and blew the page up with my academic accomplishments.

I would not say lie on your applications - that can bite you very painfully in the ass - but always tailor your experience to what you are applying for. If you were, for example, applying to a customer service job, you could stress the customer service aspects of what you did on eBay.

Also - unless it's a regional thing (I'm in the US, not sure if this differs in other countries) or the employer is specifically asking for it, I would probably go with calling it your "resume" instead of your "CV". CV is typically for more academically-oriented positions, for people with extensive academic presentations, publications, research, and so on. You may want to create both, especially if you continue to develop a film portfolio, but for summer jobs I think resume is more likely to be appropriate. :)
I always tailor my CV and cover letters, my God it's tiring work. I begin to forget a little who I am and usually end up with an identity crisis on my hands....like when they ask "tell me a little about yourself"....which they always do!

I lie a little on my CV, but to make me look like I have less experience though. Last interview I went to the guy was like "you've done a lot...there's a lot here" like he was disapproving.

And CV is definitely what we call it here. Resume is never used and considered American.

It's kind of funny with those low level sort of jobs because even if someone of quality did leave after a while, they'd probably do a better job than half the jokers they seem to hire. I have some friends who do low level sort of jobs and basically people's work ethic is horrible. They'd be better off hiring someone, having them do a good job for a while, then when they move on, find someone else as opposed to hiring some idiot who doesn't do a good job and then they're back to square one when they have to fire that person.
Tell me about it! On a light-hearted note, I put so much emphasis on the fact that I'll provide the best customer service ever in my latest interview, telling the interviewer about my experience with it and giving her examples. Then the interviewer looked offended and asked me if the customer service wasn't good enough already in the job I was applying for hahahah. Oh man.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It may not be so much that they don't take it seriously, and more like they think you may be good at it, but it is unrelated to what you're applying for. I know plenty of very successful people who have started out on eBay and had it in their CV's/Resumes... If you are going to have eBay on your CV, try going for more "respectable" jobs in sales and/or advertisement. It's a small leap from where you are, but it could prove very useful later on once you go for the film industry.
I applied to an advertising job. Got an interview for advertising sales rep.

YOU FUCKING PEOPLE. I am forever grateful for all your advice, I will post here whether I get the job or not!
 
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