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I’ll be one of those and just say it—just learn the theory. Enneagram is probably one of the easiest to figure out. What is your core fear and desire? Figure that out and see which one matches. Find your core before you venture to wings and tritypes. You can use this result to narrow your options down, if you want, but there are really only 9 so you might as well just learn them.

The Riso-Hudson book on Enneagram is a good resource. It also has some helpful mini-tests in it that help some.
 

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Meh, maybe I’m not committing enough time to learn all the little details but I still don’t understand how you can get 4 of 9. In what sense does that hold any validity? “Oh here’s a test, you get four results and then get to pick which one you really are.”? What…

To clarify, I would like go figure out which one I am but all four hold weight. So I suppose the real question here is: why would someone get four results when you’re only supposed to be one? It makes no sense.
I don’t see the point in slapping a label on yourself without taking a little time to make sure it’s even right.

It makes no sense to completely rely on these tests in the first place anyway. I’m not sure why you’re confused about it giving you four options. Even some MBTI tests do this. It’s trying to narrow down (which is the most use you can get out of these online tests). It’s likely that your answers more or less ticked boxes for those four enneagram types the most and that is why none stood out as significantly more pronounced, and now it’s your turn to figure out which one’s which. It’s like taking a cognitive functions test where they give you your three possible MBTI types in the end based on their calculation.

My suggestion is to take some time to learn the theory. It’s even simpler than MBTI and mostly only require honesty. Focus on core fears and desires because they’re the point of enneagram.
 
What I mean by that is—if I relied completely on online enneagram tests, I’m certain to get a high score for core 1 because of certain traits I have (such as being a perfectionist and responsible, which likely comes from being XXTJ than anything else). However, looking at the theory behind, 1s care about corruption the most, at their core. Meanwhile, I could really care less about that and I’ve never once dreamt to be a good, perfect person. On the contrary, I know that to be impossible and there are things I care about more in life than how good I am or how evil I am. Despite displaying typical 1-like behaviour and traits, I just cannot relate to 1’s core fears and desires—aka the point of enneagram.


At the very least, read the core motivations of each enneagram type. This is less about your behaviour and more about what drives it.
 

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=?

If you know this book, I'm surprised you're saying this. Somewhere in there, it also says that to identify with any type at all means we are not healthy. The Enneagram covers unhealthy manifestations of types, though, so this should be common sense probably...since it means you're relating to unhealthy behaviors. It's not always the easiest to figure out: A) if you're not unhealthy, B) if Enneagram doesn't cover your things, C) if you lack self-awareness in the less healthy things in yourself, D) if you have a disorder affecting the way your personality seems, E) several others
That book explains each type well, and since OP seems to like using tests to figure their type out and the book has handy tests that help narrow down possible types, I suggested it as a good resource. (Though I will never really suggest relying on only tests, which I think I already pointed out.)

Actually, it illustrates both healthy and unhealthy behaviours—it even has examples depending on exactly how healthy/unhealthy an individual of each type is. There are also challenges to each type’s growth clearly laid out as well as suggestions for improvement. It’s quite good at explaining those things—at highlighting disintegration and integration. I didn’t think these things were bad at all, but rather helpful in figuring one’s type out. If anything, their sections on wings are the ones that are lacking.

Whether or not you can be honest with yourself enough to figure your own type out is another matter entirely—plus, that won’t affect only enneagram, but probably most other personality theories. If the problem is exactly that, it’s probably best not to even attempt typing yourself.
 

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I find it sad, albeit interesting in the sense of seeing the way human minds work, when people are so firm on their belief in typology systems that they'd sooner question someone's integrity/character, logic, any and everything about an individual, than listen to someone say the system is flawed and somehow they don't fit well into it. If it were based on scientific fact, I could see it. Hell, at least religion manipulates people into being afraid not to believe, and to fear their beliefs being shaken. The fact that so many people do this with merely theoretical abstract models that even the founders and authors never claimed were accurate, and have claimed were incomplete works, however, is truly perplexing to me. I crave to understand why such a belief is so sacred, for a lack of better words, to some people. To me, this psychological phenomenon is much more interesting than type theory.
It’s very easy to get boxed in. Everything becomes explained by cognitive functions, almost as if that’s it—that’s the pinnacle of human psychology lol when they can’t even agree on one definition of most things. Most discussions here on theory is almost always that way. It’s easy to forget it’s a theory.

It’s very easy to find posts here attempting to explain everything going wrong with their lives or selves using typology. I try to refrain from using MBTI or other typology systems as much as possible when giving advice to people here, but it’s too often they won’t be interested in actual, practical advice and would skip those in favour of whoever is willing to break down things in cognitive functions speak and whatever other method. It’s strange. Then you see some change their types weekly and rather than using typology to broaden their understanding of fellow humans and themselves, they’re limiting it instead.

I find typology, no matter what kind, a fun past-time, nothing more.
 

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Well said. At this point, most of my own interest is in analyzing concepts such as these in the typology community. It's an interesting dynamic, almost like religion without the manipulative reward/punishment conditioning, etc. I find things such as confirmation bias, and the fact that emotional/group affiliation is more impactful than facts, quite annoying...which is why I'd like to understand it more, and be able to influence others in healthier directions more effectively.
Great! That’s a far better use of one’s time beyond studying for fun.
 
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