Personality Cafe banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,657 Posts
ENTJ Extraverted Thinking with Intuition


ENTJ people use their thinking to run as much of the world as may be theirs to run. They enjoy executive action and long-range planning. Reliance on thinking makes them logical, analytical, objectively critical, and not likely to be convinced by anything but reasoning. They tend to focus on the ideas, not the person behind the ideas.


They like to think ahead, organize plans, situations, and operations related to a project, and make a systematic effort to reach their objectives on schedule. They have little patience with confusion or inefficiency, and can be tough when the situation calls for toughness.
They think conduct should be ruled by logic, and govern their own behavior accordingly. They live by a definite set of rules that embody their basic judgements about the world. Any change in their ways requires a deliberate change in their rules.

They are mainly interested in seeing the possibilities beyond what is present, obvious, or known. Intuition heightens their intellectual interest, curiosity for new ideas, tolerance for theory, and taste for complex problems.

ENTJ are seldom content in jobs that make no demands upon their intuition. They are stimulated by problems and are often found in executive jobs where they can find and implement new solutions. Because their interest is in the big picture, they may overlook the importance of certain details. Since ENTJs tend to team up with like-minded intuitives who may also underestimate the realities of a situation, they usually need a person around with good common sense to bring up overlooked facts and take care of important details.


Like the other decisive types, ENTJs run the risk of deciding too quickly before they have fully examined the situation. They need to stop and listen to the other person's viewpoint, especially with people who are not in a position to talk back. This is seldom easy for them, but if they do not take time to understand, they may judge too quickly, without enough facts or enough regard for what other people think or feel.
ENTJs may need to work at taking feeling values into account.



Relying so much on their logical approach, they may overlook feeling values--what they care about and what other people care about. If feeling values are ignored too much, they may build up pressure and expression in inappropriate ways. Although ENTJs are naturally good at seeing what is illogical and inconsistent, they may need to develop the art of appreciation. One positive way to exercise their feelings is though appreciation of other people's merits and ideas. ENTJs who learn to make it a rule to mention what they like, not merely what needs correcting, find the results worthwhile both in their work and in their private lives.

ENTJ​
Life's Natural Leaders

Hearty, argumentative, and robust are three words that accurately describe ENTJs. Their unique preferences combine to give them very high need for control and unusual leadership abilities.​
Their focus and energy are directed outwardly (Extraversion) towards a world of endless possibilities and meanings (Intuition), which are translated objectively into system and products (Thinking) in a very timely and orderly fashion (Judging).

Like their cousins, the ENTPs, the entire world seems a chessboard to ENTJs, with pieces in need of being moved--by them--for the greater good. Life is a system of forces to be understood, mastered, harnessed, altered, or defeated, as appropriate, from day to day.


For the ENTJ, all life unfolds through confrontation, arguing, and engaging with one another in the name of learning. The ENTJ starts with the basic assumption that he or she is right and must be proven wrong. This proving process will be beneficial only to the extent that there are others who have the gumption or audacity required to mount an effective challenge. When the engagement is over, if the ENTJ was right, everyone will be better for having gone through the process. If the ENTJ is wrong, then there will be profound admiration and respect for whoever was strong enough to prevail, as well as gratitude and respect for the new lesson learned.


In some ways, life for the ENTJ is a variation of the children's game King (or Queen) of the Mountain. The goal for others is to try to push the ENTJ down from the mountaintop. So long as they are unable to do so, they must remain "beneath" the ENTJ. The process of being challenged is as important to the ENTJ as the outcome.​
As a type, ENTJs have low regard for people who refuse to engage them or ate intimidated by them, and high regard for those who stand up to them and challenge them intellectually, emotionally, or any other way. The problem of intimidation is intensified by the ENTJ's arrogance, which is often so much a part of them that they are unaware of its existence. Those around them are usually keenly aware of it.​
ENTJs are often impatient, more so than most other types. Their impatience may show itself in the form of a quick temper, inappropriate complaints over relatively small matters, and an urgency to move on to bigger and better things. Their strong egos can trick them into thinking they can do or handle anything, including details and intense interpersonal matters, but details and interpersonal skills are simply not the ENTJ's strong suits.

When an ENTJ "fails" at such matters, the resulting stress, frustration, and feelings of incompetence can result in self-flagellation and criticism, often totally out of proportion to the issue at hand. Indeed, when it comes to criticism of self or others, ENTJs are usually in a class by themselves.​
ENTJs are especially gifted with language. Clarity of thought and speech make them excellent communicators. It also sharpens the precision of their critical abilities.

Clearly, gender issues are especially significant for ENTJ females. As a type, their arrogant, confrontational manner and need for control can appear to be quite "unwomanly" to others. Efforts by parents and others to mold them into more traditional female images are usually met with rebellion. Other women usually resent the arrogance of ENTJ females may unwittingly find herself to be a loner, something particularly difficult for Extraverts.

Of course, the problem intensifies for the ENTJ female when dealing with men, even male ENTJs. Their demanding, objective, competent, and independent nature is not particularly endearing to most men. These qualities may obscure the fact that ENTJ females can be quite nurturing and caring. For them, femininity is not defined by traditional roles. It is reflected in the total involvement and commitment they bring to each moment of life.

Though they qualities of ENTJs may be more acceptable in males, they, too, may find people shunning them, often avoiding confrontations in order to escape their arrogance. As with their female counterparts, ENTJ males may be plagued by staff, family and personal relationships in turmoil, leaving them with more time alone than their Extraversion can deal with.

To their frequent surprise, ENTJs are often told they appear angry, even when it is just their enthusiasm for a point that has gotten them so worked up. Such encounters can be frustrating for ENTJs--as well as for those around them--and they may find themselves in the rather ironic position of having angrily to defend their nonanger. The sense of futility that results may make the ENTJ try even harder or, as is often the case with ENTJs, may make them give up and move on to some other project. In either case, the result can be debilitating to all involved.

The ENTJ's home is the arena for all sorts of pursuits. Relationships there tend to be open, honest, and stimulating. While to others ENTJs may seem somewhat abrasive, those who know them well understand that, as with other EJs, their bark is usually worse than their bite. To an ENTJ, relationships grow and develop over time.

As parents, ENTJs see children as fund because they are young adults to be encouraged, enlightened, and stimulated. As they grow, the children, too, become eligible to be drawn into hearty discourse about a variety of subjects. And they become candidates for the molding and shaping that ENTJs like to do for those they care about or have responsibilities for.

The ENTJ style of living is fairly compulsive and family members must know their responsibilities within the system. When rebellion is encountered, the ENTJ may enjoy the exchange, even admire at some level the boldness of whoever is rebelling, but still use maximal powers of persuasion to quell the revolt and ensure that all family members continue to march to the beat of the ENTJ drummer. If the rebel manages to win, that person also wins the ENTJ's respect. Each day, at work or at home, the ENTJ may win some and lose some, but there are few, if any, draws.

Relaxation does not come easily to most ENTJs and when it does, it is only because it has been scheduled. Even then it is viewed as one more assignment to master, and ENTJs attack such challenges with zeal and complusiveness.

ENTJ children are rather direct with both their peers and adults. Though they are often bossy and argumentative, they make friends easily, are quick-witted and gregarious, and have strong needs, like other Extraverts, to include others and be included by others in everything they do, from working to studying to partying. In the eyes of peers, ENTJ children can be simultaneously respected for their capabilities and resented for the obnoxious, overpowering conviction that accompanies their ideas. Competitive in most anything they do, ENTJ children start early to criticize their own shortcomings. They rarely rest on their laurels.



Even the best, they believe, can be better. That, indeed, is how the ENTJ approaches everything.​
Teachers, of course, may not always understand these attributes, and the result is often some very hostile moments, power struggles that the student is likely to lose. If there is no face-saving way out, the ENTJ can be resistant to subsequent learning experiences. While a good, challenging, competitive engagement that involves an exchange of ideas is enjoyable for ENTJs, the one-sided teacher-student power struggle can be damaging and alienating.

Family events are fun for the ENTJ. They are yet another chance to plan, organize, lead, and show off. It is a time for intellectual exchange and robust encounter. ENTJs look forward to such events with great enthusiasm.

With their natural leadership and systems-planning abilities, ENTJs often rise to upper levels of management fairly quickly. They may alienate some people along the way, but that's all part of the price one pays to express ability and prove competency. Moreover, if one achieves one's goals and has caused learning and growth for self and others, then the alienation was not in vain. Approaching these interpersonal dilemmas objectively, they find it surprising that anyone would be hurt, disappointed, or intimidated by their aggressiveness. In their objectivity, they don't understand why anyone would personalize an argument or competition that was, to their mind, well intentioned, meant only to result in the growth and betterment of all concerned.

Older age for the ENTJ is still a time for conceptual and intellectual expansion. Good development will bring more respect for behavior. However, the later years must still include some form of mental challenge, the more competitive the better. For the ENTJ, the reqards of maturity are the opportunities to read, argue, organize, or theorize--in other words, to continue on his or her lifelong path, but with less accountability. Retirement, if it ever comes, will see a continuation of these activities in some form or another.

Famous likely ENTJs include Douglas MacArthur (whose Extraversion kept him clamoring for the limelight, who viewed himself as a strategist of a high military system with no patience for detail, and whose objectivity always kept a sharp distinction between his mission and the people involved); Eleanor Roosevelt (whose social gregariousness kept her in headlines, whose intuition made her a futurist always looking at the big picture, and who loved managing complex systems); and Frank Lloyd Wright (who implemented his Intuitive-Thinking architectural visions with buildings and systems, whose Judging nature produced guidelines for other architects to follow, and whose Extraversions brought those systems to the public's view).

Summary - ENTJ​
Contributions to the Organization

  • Bring strong ideals of how organizations should treat people​
  • Enjoy leading and facilitating teams​
  • Enjoy cooperation​
  • Communicate organizational values​
  • Like to bring matters to fruitful conclusions​
Leadership Style

  • Lead through personal enthusiasm​
  • Take a participative stance in managing people and projects​
  • Responsive to followers' needs​
  • Challenge the organization to make actions congruent with values​
  • Inspire change​
Preferred Work Environment

  • Contains individuals focused on changing things for the betterment of others​
  • People-oriented​
  • Supportive and social​
  • Has a spirit of harmony​
  • Encourages expression of self​
  • Settled​
  • Orderly​
Potential Pitfalls

  • May idealize others and suffer from blind loyalty​
  • May sweep problems under the rug when in conflict​
  • May ignore the task in favor of relationship issues​
  • May take criticism personally​
Suggestions for Development

  • May need to recognize the limitations of people and guard against unquestioning loyalty​
  • May need to learn to manage conflict productively​
  • May need to pay as much attention to the details of the task as to the people​
  • May need to suspend self-criticism and listen carefully to the objective information contained in feedback​
Order of Mental Preferences

  1. Thinking​
  2. Intuition​
  3. Sensing​
  4. Feeling​
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,657 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
"Order of Mental Preferences

  1. Feeling<<<<<???​
  2. Intuition​
  3. Sensing​
  4. Thinking"​


What?
Hahaha, I am not sure why it says that. I can't edit the post due to me posting more than 24 hours ago, but it should be:

1. Thinking
2. Intuition
3. Sensing
4. Feeling

:crazy:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Headcase

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,657 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It says ENFJ at first, maybe those 4 traits are in the order of ENFJ... which I'm pretty sure they are.
Haha, a several of the profiles said that but I caught most of them. Ah well. If a mod sees this, can you fix it? :tongue:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Headcase

·
Read Only
Joined
·
2,446 Posts
Not a bad article, I skimmed it, and what I'm learning to spot are behaviors based on enneagram traits, in some things above you can see 6, 7, 3, 8, etc.

6s would be quick to complain and get riled up about little details, 8s would be less likely to let small things bother them if at all. Once you know which "flavor" of ENTJ you're dealing with (and with all other types really) you can better learn what to expect of them. Most people do not have this understanding, which is why I typically avoid disclosing my MBTI, cause fully a 1/3 of this profile might not apply to me at all. I find it saves everyone time to just let people take me as I come.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
676 Posts
Not a bad article, I skimmed it, and what I'm learning to spot are behaviors based on enneagram traits, in some things above you can see 6, 7, 3, 8, etc.

6s would be quick to complain and get riled up about little details, 8s would be less likely to let small things bother them if at all. Once you know which "flavor" of ENTJ you're dealing with (and with all other types really) you can better learn what to expect of them. Most people do not have this understanding, which is why I typically avoid disclosing my MBTI, cause fully a 1/3 of this profile might not apply to me at all. I find it saves everyone time to just let people take me as I come.
I've been playing around with this idea in my head for some time, but I haven't formulated anything concrete. You seem to be thinking along the same lines.

What I see is the MBTI looking at certain attributes of a person and the Enneagram looking at others, but there also being some overlap. So, we end up having these different frameworks. I think that people are still much more complex than any one of these tests show. There are clearly more than 16 or 18 types of people. If you add the MBTI with a person's Enneagram then you may have some more diversity, but I've also read....somewhere (sorry no site right now :frustrating:) that certain Enneagram types correspond to MBTI types (e.g. many INTJs are 5s). Then you have the Personal DNA test that has 256 different types, I believe. Now I'm completely throwing out test taker error and test flaws/limitations.

I guess what I'm thinking about is a overall framework of personality that combines all these tests and leads to a more detailed view of different types. Have you thought about this or do you know of any research along these lines?
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
2,446 Posts
Well... MBTI deals with behavior, and the enneagram deals with reasons/motives. I find the enneagram to be a better fit for me in terms of how I view people.

To combine them you'd have to take an INTJ of each E-type AND variant stacking (social, sexual/intimate, self-preserving) and then do the same for each type. Also, you could argue (I would) that their enneagram tri-type has an impact. For instance, an INTJ so/sx 5-8-4 would be measurably different than an INTJ so/sx 5-9-2. I have no desire to do the math to figure out how many possible combinations there would be. I'm content to round it off somewhere in the neighborhood of "Ass load".

Now, one of the reasons for the overlap, is that profiles are written by people who do not have a solid grasp on both theories. They may be unaware of enneagram, or think that overlap is normal. Perhaps they think enneagram is just another behavioral system similar to MBTI. It's not. If both systems are used in conjunction it can help you find some depth perception to a person's character gestalt... but they were not created to compliment each other. Both are designed to be stand-alone theories that can be reasonably expected to explain aspects of people based on traits that are under their perspective purview. Again, the problem is profiles like the one above that don't know which traits are which and try to do too much. Someone took many examples of ENTJs (of many different E-types) saw some common traits and wrote them all down, and said "this is ENTJ". But the statement is a false one. It CAN be ENTJ, but there are differences... differences that are measurable, understandable, and explained by a different theory/system. MBTI profiles should stick to being short and sweet, should not deviate from behavior derived from an understanding of the interplay of cognitive functions. But even that is limiting, because my functions are not arranged the way all the other ENTJs are arranged. (http://i715.photobucket.com/albums/ww157/Wolfblood138/Cog-Func.jpg for example) So my behavior will not follow linear pattern based on the stereotypical order; Te, Ni, Se, Fi. I find the enneagram to be much more stable, simply because there's lots of behavior, but only so many reasons for that behavior to go around. Still, MBTI is not without merit, and it has the benefit of being easier to dip your toes in. Meaning you can be a fairly unintelligent person and spot the difference between a person who is an extrovert and one who is an introvert. The Enneagram tends to be more subjective and open to interpretation.

To answer the spirit of the question in your post... I think the simplest way to find out how you can use both of these systems to develop Kodak quality 3D pictures of a person's gestalt is to learn all the smaller cogs in detail. Look at variant stacks for the enneagram as their own separate entity. Find out what Social is. What Self-preservation is. Those things contain traits that are global in scope and reach with regards to how they present. For instance, a Self-pres first person of any type would likely base their selection of a house to move into on how close it is too a hospital and a supermarket. Such factors would have more weight assigned to them than they would with a person who is self-pres last. Even then someone who is sp/sx is going to be a bit different with their concerns than someone who is sp/soc, even though both are sp first.

My advice to you, and anyone else who reads this and wants to have a really good handle on how to read people would be to read people. Read their words, read everything with an eye toward what type they might be. Then keep reading. Type people in public, ask random folks you encounter questions. You never know what might shake loose. Just today I asked a guy I was escorting in a controlled area personality based questions. He seemed like an INTJ to me after spending no more than 3 minutes in a truck riding to a building... turns out he knew a bit about MBTI and had self typed as ISTJ, and maybe he's right, but as the conversation continued I saw some definate N. He was older, so perhaps his N fucntions were a bit more developed. Point is, these kinds of conversations can give you lots of insight and have a positive impact on how you type people, and how you see each personality type. You'll learn how to feel the "textures" of each personality in your mind the way you can feel the difference between satin and linen in your hand. Things will just click. It takes a long time... it's a lot of work, and requires a pretty deep immersion to pay off. If you cannot appreciate the potential benefits of being able completely size someone up in about 180 seconds, it probably wont be worth the effort to you.

Probably the longest post I've ever written here... hope it provided you with something of value.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,657 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Grim, I asked you a while ago what you think my Enneagram is but you never responded. If you want to guess, please do. I don't mind if you don't want to. I completely understand. :crazy:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Headcase

·
Registered
Joined
·
676 Posts
Well... MBTI deals with behavior, and the enneagram deals with reasons/motives.
Yes, absolutely.


To combine them you'd have to take an INTJ of each E-type AND variant stacking (social, sexual/intimate, self-preserving) and then do the same for each type. Also, you could argue (I would) that their enneagram tri-type has an impact. For instance, an INTJ so/sx 5-8-4 would be measurably different than an INTJ so/sx 5-9-2. I have no desire to do the math to figure out how many possible combinations there would be. I'm content to round it off somewhere in the neighborhood of "Ass load".
Quite so and I don't feel like figuring the permutations either.


Both are designed to be stand-alone theories that can be reasonably expected to explain aspects of people based on traits that are under their perspective purview.
Yes. I agree.


I find the enneagram to be much more stable, simply because there's lots of behavior, but only so many reasons for that behavior to go around.
What books/online sources do you prefer on the Enneagram?


To answer the spirit of the question in your post... I think the simplest way to find out how you can use both of these systems to develop Kodak quality 3D pictures of a person's gestalt is to learn all the smaller cogs in detail. Look at variant stacks for the enneagram as their own separate entity. Find out what Social is. What Self-preservation is.
Thank you. I will look into that. I believe self preservation fits me.


Probably the longest post I've ever written here... hope it provided you with something of value.
Absolutely and I genuinely appreciate you taking the time to explain this all to me. Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
675 Posts
It is a good thing ENTJs supposedly exhibit merely natural leadership. We wouldn't want supernatural leaders, would we? Then again, we could get by with a synthetic, artificial leader just fine!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
Potential Pitfalls

  • May idealize others and suffer from blind loyalty​
  • May sweep problems under the rug when in conflict​
  • May ignore the task in favor of relationship issues​
  • May take criticism personally​
Nice article!

Can you explain this part? What do you mean by potential pitfalls? And the suggestions seem to be more for an ENFJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,990 Posts
  • May need to recognize the limitations of people and guard against unquestioning loyalty​
one can be loyal to an organization but not to the actual leadership if they are not competent enough; also, unquestioning loyalty to an organization is not a bad thing if the company doesn't hurt people, it's hard to pull back as an ENTJ, no ENTJ ever gives less than maximum effort, they either do something as well as possible, no matter what it takes, or not

there is no neutral territory

how else would you account for massive professional success, if not stemming from complete dedication to a job and an organization, as a service to the world ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,012 Posts
one can be loyal to an organization but not to the actual leadership if they are not competent enough; also, unquestioning loyalty to an organization is not a bad thing if the company doesn't hurt people, it's hard to pull back as an ENTJ, no ENTJ ever gives less than maximum effort, they either do something as well as possible, no matter what it takes, or not

there is no neutral territory

how else would you account for massive professional success, if not stemming from complete dedication to a job and an organization, as a service to the world ?

Effort is gauged by passion. If I know I'm just using it as stepping stone (resume filler); there's no way an organization will see maximum effort from me. They will see at most, what is needed to get the job done. That could be 10% of what I'm capable of.

For me there is neutral territory, and it's normally when I'm just observing to learn something. I don't want to be involved or get attached to the goal of the org.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
Effort is gauged by passion. If I know I'm just using it as stepping stone (resume filler); there's no way an organization will see maximum effort from me. They will see at most, what is needed to get the job done. That could be 10% of what I'm capable of.

For me there is neutral territory, and it's normally when I'm just observing to learn something. I don't want to be involved or get attached to the goal of the org.
Of course not to say 90% is sitting on your bum, but that the mentality of voluntary effort and focus skyrockets your value

That being said, even resume filler jobs can have reputational and networking value.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,012 Posts
Of course not to say 90% is sitting on your bum, but that the mentality of voluntary effort and focus skyrockets your value

That being said, even resume filler jobs can have reputational and networking value.

I spent the 90% networking. LOL. No, apparently even 10% was amazing work-- but I don't like stating that because it makes me look arrogant. I always say, "If it has my name on it, it has to be damn good." And it normally is. 10% doesn't equal shitty work, it just means that's just the effort needed from me to do great work for that particular project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,853 Posts
For the record, I think the potential pitfalls, job environment, and a few other things are off in this article. I can't imagine an ENTJ forgetting a task for personal-related issues. :laughing:

And, don't get me wrong; I like harmony. However, I'd prefer fruitful, rational competition to harmony any day. I've never seen harmony effect great change; competition produces it every day. That said, if the competition is pointless, I try to restore peace. Pointless arguing is a waste of time, and can negatively affect interpersonal relationships. Those bad relationships and wasted time, in turn, can and do hamper productivity (or negatively affect the work environment, which in turn hampers productivity).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,721 Posts
For the record, I think the potential pitfalls, job environment, and a few other things are off in this article. I can't imagine an ENTJ forgetting a task for personal-related issues. :laughing:

And, don't get me wrong; I like harmony. However, I'd prefer fruitful, rational competition to harmony any day. I've never seen harmony effect great change; competition produces it every day. That said, if the competition is pointless, I try to restore peace. Pointless arguing is a waste of time, and can negatively affect interpersonal relationships. Those bad relationships and wasted time, in turn, can and do hamper productivity (or negatively affect the work environment, which in turn hampers productivity).
You know, for the bottom part, I think that the OP accidentally took some of the ENFJ sections and copied them when posting this article. When I read a lot of those, they sound very Fe-ish and ENFJ-ish to me.

I could be wrong, but those bottom parts just don't seem to match up with the top article. That would also explain the original "mistake" that someone pointed out about the order of preferences...how feeling was listed first and thinking was listed last.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
Skipped the bulit lists, read all the rest, was very good, practically amazing, if we skip the the natural flaws of arrogant/arrogant/arrogant and arrogant (not a single mention of the word confidence in the whole post).
And
ENTJ children can be simultaneously respected for their capabilities and resented for the obnoxious, overpowering conviction that accompanies their ideas.
"Obnoxious" lies in the eyes of the beholder to paraphrase the saying...

Otherwise, with some editor cleaning it up, this is a great article.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Headcase

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
Skipped the bulit lists, read all the rest, was very good, practically amazing, if we skip the the natural flaws of arrogant/arrogant/arrogant and arrogant (not a single mention of the word confidence in the whole post).
And


"Obnoxious" lies in the eyes of the beholder to paraphrase the saying...

Otherwise, with some editor cleaning it up, this is a great article.
What about patience? And temper? Quick to anger, quick to forgive? And what about avoidance? If someone perplexes you, do you ask to clarify or avoid them? Do you think "feelers" don't make sence when explaining their needs? I don't like confrontation so I'll give a lenghthy explaination before asking...is that annoying to you guys? I'm trying to understand someone and I'm totally guessing their type... Also if you care about someone, do you worry about their feelings or just tell them straight up??? And if somone frustrates you, do you just walk away or do they get lots of chances? I'm specifically talking about someone you are attracted to and care about...
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top