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I can't for the life of me figure out anything that I want to do for a living.

Not only that but I feel that college would be a waste of time because of it's cost, along with my slipping work ethic when it comes to school. Then again I went to a high school where I was taught to conform for four years, but from what I hear that's pretty much what high school was made for.

Classes bore me, even the college courses I'm enrolled in now, and the idea of partaking in another four years of education in the America school system makes me want to drop out and save up for a car.

Is anyone having similar problems?
 

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Yes. First I thought I wanted to be a doctor (my father told me to), then as I got older and stopped caring about my parents I wanted to be a lawyer, then I learned that being a lawyers is not what you think it is (lots of paperwork, it's best suited to the ISTJ). Now I don't know what I want to do.

I'm definitely going to college. Of the ENTPs I've spoken to, they ALL say that things improved dramatically when they went to college. It's probably related to the fact that:

1. You are away from your parents, who probably hate you (am I right?)
2. You have more freedom in class choices
3. You have more freedom in studying methods
4. You have intelligent professors who like to be challenged and encourage you to think critically

Definitely going to college! As for career options, I was thinking about advertising or writing comedy for TV, but as in all creative jobs, it's somewhat risky (lots of money on the top, very little everywhere else).
 

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While this post may be a little bit late, this is exactly why I joined this forum. All my life I have been an ENTP, and on one of my favorite websites (personality pages) the description fits me to a T. (no pun intended :) Actually, there is no question about my extroversion or my perception. On some scales I've scored as high as 99% in both of these areas. And about 75% intuition.

But depending on my mood, or the occurrences that happen in my life, I can be a 51% Thinker or a 51% Feeler. This has always been a struggle for me, go with my head or go with my heart. In my relationship world, I am definitely a open book and very responsive to my feelings, but after attending law school from 1999 -- 2002 I was more of a Thinker. After spending the last six years working in social services, it allowed me to use my law degree in my more logical thinking but I did it to serve individuals with disabilities or those that were low income. Along the way, my Feeling area grew and grew. I now have a very hard time deciding whether or not I want to be labeled "The Visionary" or at the "The Inspirer". This is also one of my dilemmas.

I resigned from my job on April 1, with actually know leads anywhere. The job that I did for 18 months was driving me crazy. This is where knowing your personality really helps. I worked for an organization that had 15 employees, and we were micromanaged down to every 15 minutes. We worked an eight hour day that was divided up into 32 units, or every 15 minutes. Every day on our timesheet we had to have 32 units and document exactly what we did, who we talked to, what we mailed out, what we researched, and every two weeks when it came to turn in the timesheet I was always short on units. It was either because I did not enter them in because I went on to the next project, or the 45 minute conversation I had with a woman or client would probably be frowned upon if I listed it. I realized that it was not my calling.

A coworker of mine that I really respect turned me onto a guy by the name of Dan Hill. He has a book and a website that's called 48 Days to the Work You Love. I highly recommend it. Not only does it start off by identifying those things which you are passionate about, but also down to your gifts, talents, strengths, and weaknesses. It helps you think "outside the box". But it also has very practical common sense approaches to sending out introductory letters, resumes, interview tips, and follow-up letters. It's very much like Dave Ramsey.

So some ideas that I gathered from this book that might help you my friend, or whether some of the subjects that you can talk about for two hours and are very passionate about? What is a topic or an area that you know so well that you could probably write 20 pages about it? What are all the jobs that you have ever had and the things that you enjoyed most about them? Once you start "pointing your compass" towards your passions, then it is like a mosaic and it is revealed to you -- the big picture.

The problem with our personality types is that we have a restless spirit, and we are talented in many different areas, and unfortunately while we may be a jack of all trades, it's hard to pin us down to a desk job working 9-to-5 40 hours a week without giving us some autonomy. We are the visionaries. So I suggest that you not try to figure out the rest of your life in the next 48 hours, but rather breathe, sleep, exercise, and then do daily hours of research on the topic so I listed above: your passions, your talents, your skills, your strengths... and research areas that involve growth or program development because we kind of like to be our own boss. I know you mentioned that you do not want to go back to school, trust me, I can totally relate. I did not want to go to law school but I did not know what to do with a history degree. So one thing that I've always loved is teaching. And there is a definite need for good teachers. One thing I'm trying to decide is what my audience would be. High school kids, college-age kids, or students in law school. At the same time after having developed my resume and cover letter, I am shooting out 15 to 20 cover letters and resumes a week. Don't even bother looking online for jobs, because one of the little tidbits of advice is that if you wait to see a job posted somewhere you're already behind the curve. Market yourself and your skills and the job will come to you. With your personality profile, you can do just about anything from starting your own business to managing a growing company or helping them grow. You do not have to figure this all out overnight. You also don't have to stay with the company for more than a year if you are not happy. Nobody should ever work just for a paycheck. When you do that, and are unsatisfied with your work, other areas of your life will start to become depleted. Physically, emotionally, relationships, exercise, social... it just isn't worth it and in this economy it may be a great idea to go back to school and work on an advanced degree that specializes in an area that you are already well versed in but want that certificate to prove it. As I write this, I hope it helps, but it is also a way for me to "journal" my thoughts as well. Best of luck!
 

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Depends on what your definition of "young" is. If by young, you mean 14, I'm all ears. ;D :tongue::blushed::proud::wink:
 

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I've thought about being a air traffic controller, an adventure guide, a journalist, buying and running a franchise, a lawyer, a photographer, make my own path, a nuclear engineer, and now I've pretty much decided I'll look at doing something fun, and then become a professor at an university when it's time to settle down. I'm not going to be a hundred percent happy with myself if I don't do something adventurous for while, I'd love to have josh gate's job, and you only live once so. I'm going to go for something I can travel and do field research, and then settle at a nice university to start a family, may not be the 6 figure income I really want but, the possibility is there if I play my cards right and if not I'll still be happy life. (I'm sure I'll make enough to be comfortable.)
 

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Not really a hard time, I mean the best careers for an ENTP...

*counts on fingers* You've got your dictators, your tyrants, your overlords, your lawyers.

It's fairly straightforward. It's the laziness to overcome, really. Lazy rulers are always getting 'overthrown',
or 'exiled', or 'beheaded' or 'sued'.


::sigh::


It's a thankless job.
 

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i've narrowed it down. psychologist, philosophy professor, or entrepreneur...and maybe some acting on the side. :wink:
 

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Get used to changing jobs or professions. It's not just part of our personality or in our DNA, it's also part of the economy today. In this book that I am reading, the average person stays in the job 3.5 years or changes jobs 15 to 17 times in their lifetime. For people like us, that are talented and interested in lots of different areas that is going to be also apparent in relationships with the opposite sex. I can date a girl for 18 months, but then I get restless and start to withdraw. Same thing in my careers. They are fun for about 18 months and then I get bored with the routine. I think being a psychologist, counselor, lawyer, entrepreneur are all great professions because you're dealing with different people every day in different situations. We are not the scientists, data crunchers, routine or remedial work. Dream big! And it doesn't matter if you're 14, 44, or 85, our personalities do not change that much, we can modify our behavior but that's only going to frustrate us in the end if we are not true to ourselves.

The bottom line is to pursue your passion no matter how distant or unrealistic it is. You know the old phrase, it's the thrill of the hunt not the actual capture. When it has come to finding a job, dating a girl, picking out an apartment or house, deciding on which school to go to, we can see the opportunities in all different areas, and there is excitement. But if things become stagnant you have to change. And depending on how extroverted you are, if you're not working with people you are going to be miserable. Never look for a job where you are stuck behind a desk working 8 to 5 or staring at a computer screen all day. We need social interaction. Like a flower needs sunlight.
 

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I once started to narrow down what I wanted to do...the list grew 2 times bigger :(
 

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I'm incredibly uncertain. Sure, granted I still have 4 more years to decide but I can't for the life of me decide what I want to do. I want to do so many things and it's so damn difficult to narrow them down and choose! :mad: :confused::dry::frustrating:
 
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I can't decide on a career either so I've given up trying to pick one career!

Instead I've got a few planned! So far one the list of thngs to try:

Actuary - Get paid shit loads for doing maths. HELL YEAH!

Architect - Once I get the middle life crisis and need to become creative! Also then I can build myself my own home to have a familly for a while!

Programer - for when I'm young and want to travel about loads. Also handy for other jobs as people respect you when you can make PCs dance!

Lecturer - I wanna be on TED.com and I want a Phd so I can officially be called Dr.

Entreprenuer - Cause I think thats just in my nature and most people I admire are entreprenuers! (and yes I know I can't spell!)

Actor - whenever I can If I can. I do a lot of stage stuuf and I love doing comedy so If I get a chance at Uni I will take it!

Yeah theres loads more but those are the realistic ones! I'm either going down the programmer, actuary or lecturer route first. Entreprenuer later when I get something to start a business with! and Architect when I'm older and feel the need to creat and shape the wolrd more rather than just experience it!
 

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YESSSSSSSS x1000!

My problem stems from the fact that I want to do everything. In my dream life, I start as a local news host who gains nationwide acclaim upon the publication of my first novel, which then gets signed for a movie deal and gets my foot in the door for a movie production career, for which I will gain international recognition and be able to travel the world. While all this is happening, my permanent home would be in a picturesque small town, where I will direct the school plays, raise horses, compose original pieces for the community college orchestra, and found a non-profit dedicated to improving the community. I'd also have a family, and play host to the family reunions every Thanksgiving and Christmas. It's important to note that this is all cumulative, not a progression; the only "progression" comes in "retirement," (i.e., post kids' graduation) when I will run for senator, and hopefully by then space exploration will become commonplace enough that I can visit the moon before I die. Yup, that's the dream. And no, they definitely don't have a major for that.

So I guess I shouldn't have been so enthusiastic when I said yes. The answer is actually, "No, I know EXACTLY what I WANT to do, I just don't know which one to tell my parents I'm going for first." (Because let's face it, if anyone could pull off a life like described, it's an ENTP).

I'm currently a journalism major, but that only covers a fraction of what I want my career-ish thing to be.
 

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Visit this link (may need to copy and paste):

www.bmjcareers.co.uk

It is written for physicians but I think it could be something for everyone.

When you enter the page, go to the "search"-box and search for "understanding personality types". Interesting articles for those about to choose careers and who are interested in MBTI.
 

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I think I have wanted to try every job at some point.
For me, college was never really a question. I just wanted to surround myself with other intellectuals...

At this point, I have narrowed it down to trial lawyer, philosophy professor, psychologist, or an actress. :proud:
My dream job is to be a research psychologist, and do voice-over acting on the side...
...I think...
 

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And depending on how extroverted you are, if you're not working with people you are going to be miserable. Never look for a job where you are stuck behind a desk working 8 to 5 or staring at a computer screen all day. We need social interaction. Like a flower needs sunlight.
Incredibly true. The last few years i have been working too much alone (personal reasons). Now I am starting up projects with other people just for the interaction and "drive" this gives me. Socializing with enthusiastic people really energizes me.
 

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Incredibly true. The last few years i have been working too much alone (personal reasons). Now I am starting up projects with other people just for the interaction and "drive" this gives me. Socializing with enthusiastic people really energizes me.
Yes, definitively true! Stuck behind a desk, long term follow-up paperwork and one-on-one interactions in the office. A true killer. At least for me.
 
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I used to have the same trouble of not knowing what I wanted to do. There was a point where i was going to do 3 degrees, but due to the New Zealand Education system I was forced to narrow it down. Which is realy hard. I had to know where I wanted to go by 15.

Ultimately I chose
Architect or an Engineer(Software or Mechatronics)
 

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It clearly doesn't get better. My husband is a 34-year-old ENTP.

Bachelor's degree in computer engineering -> job working programming military radios -> master's in "applied computer science -> programming non-embedded software -> layoff
MBA -> owning his own business

Now he's decided that he doesn't like owning his own business, so he's sold it and is going to law school. (Which involves a 3.5 hour drive and him having an apartment there during the week.)

Frustrates the hell out of me. I got my degree in computer science and just celebrated eleven years at this job. If I lost it, I'd look for another programming job.
 
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