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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have an ENTP personality and I have started to study law in a foreign language. I am not living in the same country as my university, but I have all the online resources and books needed.

So as this is distant learning and thus group learning is not an option, any ideas on how to gain enough inspiration to make this study go smoothly?
 

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If you already know the language then the hardest part is already taken care of. From here on out, if youre a visual thinker, create mental pictures that contain all the properties that you are trying to learn and make sure the picture represents the relation between all those properties.

I tend to read whatever it is I'm learning, then visually understanding the whole system of what I'm learning by focusing on all the properties and the relations between all the properties in the subject at hand. The easiest way to visually represent these properties is to see how each subset relates to its set. For instance, assault is a set that contains subsets such as domestic assault, aggravated assault, and so on, but each subset of assault will have to be directly connected to the act of assault, so from here all you have to is understand why each subset of assault is the form of assault that it is. So you can mentally visualize assault (the set), then you can see how assault can be utilized under different contexts (subsets).

I don't take written notes because I see it as a distraction, along with being an inefficient use of time, so all of my notes are stored within my head as visual information. Utilizing visual representations helps organize the information being learned, and helps with understanding how each thing being learned is in reference to all other objects, along with all other contexts.

How to gain inspiration? Make use of working out, and eating the right foods that boost your learning performance. Also stay focused on a goal that your studying can help attain such as future cash, future vacations, future property, more resources. Basically think of the potential that you will receive from learning and how it can benefit your future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much for your answer.

Your advice on visual understanding is very good as I have read that one must classify facts, notions etc into categories and subcategories according to the program of the professor. Many notions have the same words both in constitutional law and civil law for example but of course different definitions. So one needs to be able to instantly remember the different terms from different "categories".
I think that in law, students are obliged to take notes because first it is both a literal and a technical study, and additionally one need to learn thinking, writing, and expressing oneself almost in a new language - the juridical language.

Anyway, I think the biggest problem is that though I have the diplomas needed to study in that language, I do not fully master it. I think I will have to look up every single word, as even some daily used expressions means something very specific in law. I hate having to constantly look up in the dictionary. It is so tiresome and time-consuming, but of course there is no other way to do. Any suggestions on how I can easily remember these words from time to time?

Your advices on inspiration are very true. I am in fact not eating and sleeping right + some other stressful situations that have been in the way. I have indeed made some notes-to-myself with what inspires me about the study itself and future opportunities. But they don't quite work when the annoying dictionary is glaring at me and statistics which are showing that 80% of the students fail on the first and second year. Normally I would take this as a challenge, so I don't know why it doesn't work for me now.
 

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@etudiante

Here is an e-book that is along the lines of what @Shadow Logic was describing that you might find helpful:

http://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/Programs/HolisticLearningEBook.pdf
Would also recommend you check out the blog "Study Hacks" run by Cal Newport. This guy did a study on the top students at Ivy leagues schools, published a few cool books himself. Not 100% pertinent to your situation but he has some great study tips, especially on the site.

Study Hacks - Decoding Patterns of Success - Cal Newport

Specifically, check out this page, more specifically, the bottom part: About the Study Hacks Blog - Cal Newport
(lately he's been doing more career-related stuff, hence having to go in the archives)

EDIT: also check out Anki if you haven't. It's Spaced Reputation Software (SRS) which is designed to make memorizing things most efficient. Think of it as notecard memorization implemented to its fullest potential. Good for memorizing vocab.
 

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Hi all,

I have an ENTP personality and I have started to study law in a foreign language. I am not living in the same country as my university, but I have all the online resources and books needed.

So as this is distant learning and thus group learning is not an option, any ideas on how to gain enough inspiration to make this study go smoothly?
Sorry, can't help. I've got photographic memory, so I wouldn't know.
But Skype?
 

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Anyway, I think the biggest problem is that though I have the diplomas needed to study in that language, I do not fully master it. I think I will have to look up every single word, as even some daily used expressions means something very specific in law. I hate having to constantly look up in the dictionary. It is so tiresome and time-consuming, but of course there is no other way to do. Any suggestions on how I can easily remember these words from time to time?
Since I'm visual all words that I define I perceive, so its easily available to recall in its visual form when I think or speak words. I would suggest breaking down words or terms into their parts to understand how those parts relate to their definition. Such as how the word depreciate is the combination of the individual definitions "appreciate" and "de". When the "de" is combined to appreciate by replacing the "ap", it gives the inverse of the definition of the word " appreciation". Now with that knowledge you should focus on words that contain "de", so it'll help you not only understand the words concept but also its inverses concept, making it easier to store and reference the concept of the words.

I would also focus much more on the history of these words so you can understand their origin, giving you more information to reference from. The more information you have about the concept, the more reference points you can utilize to recall such information. Which also includes seeing how words relate within their category, as in how aggrevated assault relates to assault.

If you do not fully master the language of the land, then I would suggest practicing what you do know to get a better handle while focusing on commonly used words, terms, or statements. Focusing on the commonly used while watching videos of native speakers will help you pick up meanings easier, and become more fluent in how you process them. Also reading a book in that language, while researching all the terms you don't know will also make it easier to process it more fluently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everybody.
Actually I thought about it and it is not actually the learning methods I have difficulties with. I don't face those problems in anything else I have ever learned until this day.

I think I am facing difficulties now due to two factors only: lack of motivation and language barriers.
I'm communicating in that language on a daily basis also professionally since many years. So I speak the language fluently. In fact the problem I face is mainly with the juridical language which in fact all students, also the native ones, are struggling with. One need to learn to write, speak and understand how to express oneself in it and it is not that easy when I political and juridical concepts are different from my home country. I need to read more than the native students as I need to understand a whole other political system. However I just need to deal with it and accept that I chose the hard way out.
The next is the lack of motivation. Lacking motivation makes anything seem problematic. I don't have this problem when reading juridical articles in my native language so clearly it is a matter of language and my will to focus until I overcome the language difficulties. Additionally, lawyers I meet and articles I read scare me off every time with how difficult it is in the law school I chose. Also, it's been 8 years since I studied at university and since then I have been working independently with clients, so now that I face a strict daily life for the coming 6 years or so, just the thought of being stuck to my chair from early morning to late night every single day makes me wanna do anything else but that. However, I found an article which might help me with it:
successconsciousness.com/lack-motivation-enthusiasm.htm
"Tell yourself, over and again, how much you lose by their absence, and how much you gain by having them."
The following is neither a bad idea:
"One more, useful exercise is to devote a few minutes a day, to visualizing yourself doing something you want to do, but lacks the enthusiasm and energy to do. In your imagination, see yourself acting enthusiastically and energetically. Rehearse with this mental scenario day after day."

So I am going to just have to force myself to do it until I master it.
 
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