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Greetings, fellow INTJs.

I'm actually in the process of opening my own business, which made me wonder if there are other INTJs who have had their own businesses or aspire to have one. So here it goes:

- For those aspiring to have their own business:
1. What kind of business(es) would you go for?
2. If you were to start that business, what would you need?
3. Possible weaknesses/problems that might arise from being an INTJ CEO?

- For those who already have entrepreneurial experiences:
4. What industry or what kind of business was it?
5. What problems did you have in terms of maintaining your business?
6. Overall impression and lessons learned from your experience?
 

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1. I would go for the kind of business that would allow innovation and cater to my interest.

2. Money and competent human resources.

3. Not being there for the workers.
 

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2. If you were to start that business, what would you need?
a product, (dba/llc/incorporation paperwork), drive
3. Possible weaknesses/problems that might arise from being an INTJ CEO?
I don't talk to people. I'm don't communicate with other people to help grow my business. It's all up to me and that just doesn't work/takes way longer.

- For those who already have entrepreneurial experiences:
4. What industry or what kind of business was it?
writing/publishing
5. What problems did you have in terms of maintaining your business?
Finding people to write for me knowing they will only get backend sales, low funds meaning I have to use print on demand, people don't read anymore. My INTJ-ness not allowing me to do traditional marketing(smoozing and shit)
6. Overall impression and lessons learned from your experience?
You can say you want to do something but if you're not really in there for the LONG haul your in for a bad time. You can write a book and put it out but it doesn't end there. I was dedicated for a solid 8 months, then.... burnout.
 

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1. Woodworking. I love to express myself through working with my hands.

2. A client base. Nobody would buy from me if they don't know I exist.

3. Difficulty marketing to and communicating with customers. Plus I have a tendency to get bored if I do the same thing over and over and over. I like variety in my work. I'd be afraid that I'd get bored after a few months and start slacking off.
 

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4. Residential Property Management

5. Oh where to start! I am in the suffering part of learning a lesson right now. The majority of my issues come down to working with other people. I've separated myself as much as I can during the workday but the constant, repeated questions and questionable quality of work just makes me want to punch people in the head. Obviously I keep things tactful but keeping a lid on that kind of frustration is exhausting. When I am stressed and find myself in the grip it's just not good; it happens far too often. I've got a ridiculous amount of work on now as it's our busiest month, it's busier than the last few Januarys, my business partner is recovering from major surgery this month and our admin assistant is currently on leave. I have a soul crushing amount of work to do but would you believe I'm performing much better than I normally do when they are in. Solitude, I love it!!!!!! It's like my head has gone from loud white noise to finally getting a clear signal. You may be different of course.

6. I could ramble on for hours here but I'll keep it brief. Also, my business knowledge is still a work in progress. Know yourself well and have a clear idea of the conditions you need to create for yourself and what it will take or you may just build yourself a prison instead of the freedom you hoped for. This one I learned from watching my parents in their own business: know your value and stick to your guns! You may need to discount a little to get business at the start but get and use testimonials and the minute you can scrap the discounting do so. The kind of clients who will only work with you if you discount for them are the kind of clients you just don't want. Networking - do it. I don't mean the lame formal stuff but rather connect with people and get recommendations for good lawyer, accountants, suppliers etc.

I'm sure you are way ahead of where I was when I started just by knowing the MBTI. When I started I was convinced that people just needed good service and to be given an opportunity to have the situation logically explained to them as these aren't common things in my industry. Poor service seems to be the standard and there is no time for things to be explained properly to staff, clients and customers (due to the greedy, money grubbing way many real estate businesses are set up and run). I figured we would be different because our business would be set up differently. We do give excellent service, I do take the time to explain things to people in a logical, ego saving way - this particular vision has been as success. What I have learned is that many people are just plain stupid! I know how naive I was having assumed that giving people the benefit of the doubt would lead to great results but I am blown away by just how literally stupid some people are. That was a bit of a rant, take what you want and throw away the rest.

Also, when things are going wrong be open to considering what you are doing to create/contribute to this situation and be prepared to take action to fix it.
 

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Greetings, fellow INTJs.

I'm actually in the process of opening my own business, which made me wonder if there are other INTJs who have had their own businesses or aspire to have one. So here it goes:

- For those aspiring to have their own business:


1. What kind of business(es) would you go for?
A photography business. A small team handling things like weddings. Perhaps studio shoots. Perhaps selling and marketing of landscapes.

2. If you were to start that business, what would you need?
Talent that would make up for my own short comings (i.e. sales).
Various equipment.
A site with reasonable rent yet a good location.


3. Possible weaknesses/problems that might arise from being an INTJ CEO?
People skills, in terms of driving sales. i.e. marketing, promotion. INTJs don't seem to tolerate bullshit and hyperbole, but these are important people skills.
Bill Gates found his Steve Ballmer. We'd all need to do similar.
 

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I'm self-employed, so can't really say much except that a lot of people here will probably find themselves lacking in the people skills department. It's one of the reasons I became self-employed - so I don't have to deal with humans unless I feel like it. They're strange and best observed from a distance, with the odd foray here & there.
 
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