Personality Cafe banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm wondering if there are any ETSP's out there who are into Med school ?!

Im an ESTP and currently in my 4th year of studies, I always had problems to sit down and actually study .. i tend to leave all the loads til the exam times but i made it to the 4th year at least :D
but i'm pretty good when it comes to clinics or practical work and examinations. im also curious in some way to find solutions especially when working with a group of students i feel like a little competitive

I pretty much like the practical work, but my problem is with the huge amounts of theories and diseases it bores me and i find it hard to sit and concentrate for long hours , i guess i have problems with my low J trait :mellow:

Is there anyone there that had the same experience ?? or can proivde advice in some way
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
703 Posts
I'm wondering if there are any ETSP's out there who are into Med school ?!

Im an ESTP and currently in my 4th year of studies, I always had problems to sit down and actually study .. i tend to leave all the loads til the exam times but i made it to the 4th year at least :D
but i'm pretty good when it comes to clinics or practical work and examinations. im also curious in some way to find solutions especially when working with a group of students i feel like a little competitive

I pretty much like the practical work, but my problem is with the huge amounts of theories and diseases it bores me and i find it hard to sit and concentrate for long hours , i guess i have problems with my low J trait :mellow:

Is there anyone there that had the same experience ?? or can proivde advice in some way
I finished med school in early 90s, did a rotating internship and then 3 years general internal medicine in a program affiliated with the Mayo Clinic. I sure wish I had known about MBTI then.

I am not sure if you are signing up for the match or not or know what field of specialty you want to go into. The reason I say that is grades only matter if you are looking at one of the more competitive specialties. I had a cousin who graduated from a foreign country. She had very mediocre test scores. I told her to just match in any field, and the least competitive was psych. She put it down on her match, and she matched in psych... at Harvard. She did a hated year of psych, but she was attractive, friendly, and upbeat, and so when she inquired about transferring into anesthesia, a more competitive field, the professors knew her, liked her, and let her into their program. Residency is a long process and things happen to people (visa issues, deaths in family, divorce, drug abuse ETC) so even if you don't get your first choice of where you want to be based on your grades, there are back door ways to compensate for grades to get in the program or field you want.

And I will tell you this much: as a resident working with students, I knew which students I wanted in my training program and the ones I didn't, and I didn't know or give a damn about grades. An intern I trained as a resident is now a tenured Professor at the Mayo Clinic. Truth is that he was just a so-so intern. For all his intelligence, I had to do a lot of basic training with him.

Grades are all important until you get to the last phases of training. Once you are in the training program you want, it is just a question of passing from then on. Once you are finished with training and you pass your boards, no one asks where you were in your class.

As far as waiting until the last minute to do studying, that is in our perceiver DNA. I do work that requires me to fly a lot. If I leave my house an hour and ten minutes before the flight, I will never miss it. At 50 minutes, my making or missing the flight will be a 50-50 ordeal. So when do I leave? 90% of the time between 50 minutes and one hour. I asked myself why the hell I do that. It took a while bc it involves our worst function, Fi, but I realized that I was getting an adrenaline high off leaving at the last minute. IOW, I subconsciously liked it. You need that high more than ever when doing something you don't want to do like studying for a test. In medical school, I wished I could be more consistent in my efforts but that just isn't me. Instead of being down on myself, I have just accepted that is the way I am.

Now I have to remind myself that the high of waiting until the last minute comes at the cost of the feeling of extreme stress. Do you want that high or do you want that stress I ask myself. It doesn't always work, but at least I am not down on myself when I wait too long. The cure for the last minute blues for ESTPs in connecting to our Fi.

We do live in a J world though, and I have often seen being tardy is worse than being grossly incompetent, but people in the know do care about competence. An ER is one place where an ESTP can shine. When I was working an ER, I just quickly buzzed through all the patients without a complaint. When my shift was done, a nurse told me that I had done double the work load of the last ER doctor, finished in half the time, and was much nicer. I shrugged my shoulders at the time thinking little of it, but I get now that is where Ps have it over Js.

What you have learned to date, all that time you have spent "learning" in class, will be 2% or less of what you use as a physician. If you want to be a novelist, you have to learn to read, write, and take grammar classes before you can write the great novel. That is where you are right now. The student who got an A in grammar class may have a slight edge over the B student when it comes to writing the great novel, but it is a tiny, tiny edge. There are things way, way more important than grammar grades.

No patient gives a rat's ass about theory or what could be wrong with them. That is the realm of the N and the educational portion of your training. They want to know what IS wrong with them, the reign of the S. A typical ESTP is going to be more liked by staff, patients, and the people who work under you. The SJ guardians and Ns are going to be more well liked and respected by those over them and their peers.

When you pick your field of training, try to count the Fi into your decision. People care too much about name programs, prestige, and financial prospects that what makes them happy.

Pathology, Radiology, Anesthesia are too I for ESTPs. The ER is great, but the hours and people you have to treat wore me down. ESTPs can do ER work just fine, but the politics of dealing with scumbag patients and administrators can be a bit much. OB is way too slow paced and F for an ESTP to be happy. Pure gynecology might work, but it is hard to do gyn without OB. I did nursing home geriartics for a while. The money and hours were great, but I didn't feel like I was accomplishing anything, so I quit. I went to a seminar with geriatricians once where types were listed. There were double digits of all types except for one, and which was it? ESTPs, of course. There were just two of us.

Surgery, internal medicine and its subspecialties, pediatrics, and family practice are fields where I think ESTPs will be most happy. If possible, ESTPs should be in places where politics are kept to a minimum.

In short, tune out all the talk of being #1 in your class, getting the prime residency ETC. Pick a place to train where you get the most hands on experience, and are treated with respect. See if the residents in the program are truly happy and why.

My brother went to UT-Southwestern, the "best" medical school in Texas. When it came time to pick where to train, he got the hell out of there because they treat the residents like dog shit.

If you have any other questions or concerns, post them here or just PM me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
752 Posts
As far as waiting until the last minute to do studying, that is in our perceiver DNA. I do work that requires me to fly a lot. If I leave my house an hour and ten minutes before the flight, I will never miss it. At 50 minutes, my making or missing the flight will be a 50-50 ordeal. So when do I leave? 90% of the time between 50 minutes and one hour. I asked myself why the hell I do that. It took a while bc it involves our worst function, Fi, but I realized that I was getting an adrenaline high off leaving at the last minute. IOW, I subconsciously liked it. You need that high more than ever when doing something you don't want to do like studying for a test. In medical school, I wished I could be more consistent in my efforts but that just isn't me. Instead of being down on myself, I have just accepted that is the way I am.
..........

We do live in a J world though, and I have often seen being tardy is worse than being grossly incompetent, but people in the know do care about competence. An ER is one place where an ESTP can shine. When I was working an ER, I just quickly buzzed through all the patients without a complaint. When my shift was done, a nurse told me that I had done double the work load of the last ER doctor, finished in half the time, and was much nicer. I shrugged my shoulders at the time thinking little of it, but I get now that is where Ps have it over Js.

..........

If possible, ESTPs should be in places where politics are kept to a minimum.

In short, tune out all the talk of being #1 in your class, getting the prime residency ETC. Pick a place to train where you get the most hands on experience, and are treated with respect. See if the residents in the program are truly happy and why.

I believe this to be wonderful advice for any ESTP going into any field of work. Especially the line about tardy vs competence.
 
  • Like
Reactions: elvis2010

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
sorry i had an exam couldnt reply to you sooner

Thank you so much for your brief explanation firstly,
I think its more of connecting to your J to get things done am i right , the problem lies how can u get that "high" a little bit earlier than the last few days/weeks of your exam ? I try to connect with my Fi as you noted, but our habbit of being in action "S" takes over from time to time , we tend to be good improvisers and i noticed that but when it comes to medicine improvising without previous experience or without proper preparation will only disappoint you

and What about Ni as we are lacking this skill , during the first 3 years i tend to feel my other Ni classmates can get down work faster and it took them less time than i did and i am way more relaxed at the exams time (which i should be actually stressed to be able to study :D) , Also at some times when studying I feel drained it used to be much worse in the first 2 years but im kinda getting used to it as i worked on my Ti ,, did u experience any of these things too ?

As for specialties , i listed down some options that i had my eye on , Surgery ( my father is also a surgeon so If i chose to be, i would get great help ) , orthopedics, ER or nephrology

I just started to prepare for my first USMLE exam ( its a little late but the system here is different , im American but not living in the states ) so if you had any tips for preparations it would be amazing (especially when there's no deadline i chose when to do it, there isn't that "high" or feeling stressed about it , thats what im fearing )

thank you again, its a great thing to have an advice from an ESTP Doctor (we don't exist much i believe :D )

Cheers,
K
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top