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well, i like reading into evolutionism for entertainment or with an intention to see what causes my emotional disturbances or to see if there is anything that could help pinpoint and solve it? kind of? - so it's kind of very personal

but other than that, IMHO, evolutionists think explaining everything from an evolutionary context makes sense and is a very rational thing but it hardly solves anything and they don't realise that they are actually very biased and emotionally motivated in viewing it so - and it could make certain people's values or interests rather insignificant and make them feel excluded, make human values insignificant (well, although i agree that the nature is a cold bastard) which i think is kind of nonsense

and also the concept of MEME was kind of interesting at first but then again books about it felt more like a one-track minded thing to me.. (i guess it is a sub-scientific take on 'secret' or something)

what's your view on evolutionism?
 

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evolutionists think explaining everything from an evolutionary context makes sense and is a very rational thing but it hardly solves anything and they don't realise that they are actually very biased and emotionally motivated in viewing it so
It solves plenty of questions in biology. And not all scientific investigation needs to be to solve a "problem" anyway; we can simply investigate for the sake of knowing.

On the emotion note, I'm not trying to be mean spirited, but I don't think that you give the scientific community enough credit. Whether someone is emotionally motivated or not is irrelevant to whether their findings are correct or not. What matters is their epistemology, or method of gaining knowledge, which in this case is the scientific method. As a scientist, I could hypothetically want to look for cancer treatments purely because I want to save my dying brother (all hypothetical, remember), but my findings may very well be true. We cannot commit the motive fallacy.

- and it could make certain people's values or interests rather insignificant
Let's construct an example. I am someone who feels and cares very strongly for the rest of humanity. I am them told that we are "just" (I hate this use of this word) another species of animal. If this makes me feel that my valuing of humanity is aimless, that is my problem for feeling that being an animal is a bad thing or somehow devalues human life, not the fault of the fact that were are animals. It is a subjective valoration, and it is irrelevant to whether or not evolution is true.

and make them feel excluded
From what?

make human values insignificant (well, although i agree that the nature is a cold bastard) which i think is kind of nonsense
Why? Why does the truth of evolution make human values irrelevant?

and also the concept of MEME was kind of interesting at first but then again books about it felt more like a one-track minded thing to me.. (i guess it is a sub-scientific take on 'secret' or something)
Of course the books would be one-track, they're trying to explain the concept of meme theory, not frame the debate over whether it is true or not. For that you'd have to look for introductions to contemporary sociology and cultural anthropology, possibly even sociobiology.

what's your view on evolutionism?
Biological evolution is the case. Now there are still many questions as to the specifics of its functioning, but it is true.
 
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