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Hey guys, so I'm really interested in the INFJ's experience with different types of teachers. I found a thread on PerC that had brief mentions of people's experiences with certain types, but i was specifically interested in my fellow INFJs' thoughts on this- kind of my desire to see how different teaching styles facilitated my growth or learning and how other INFJs can relate or learn from this. I always personally enjoyed classes more where the teacher or professor had some kind of interest in me. It was more fun that way, having a personal relationship with the teacher/prof rather than being some impersonal/disconnect..

Here's some from that thread that I related to:
STJ teachers are also notorious for being uptight and anal. They will not let you leave the classroom unless you're on fire or bleeding. Rules are rules: absolute and rigid, even if they don't make sense to the students. They plan out their lessons a month in advance and have uber multitasking powers-- and they usually have an agenda at the beginning of class that they strictly adhere to.

The INTP is borderline psychotic in her love for the subject she teaches. She is meticulous about grammar and formatting, and students have set their margins to 0.99 or 1.49 inches to spite her. Her words are drenched in sarcasm to pair off with her dry sense of humor.


ESxx?: This one is from my experience- not sure if this person is ESxx, just my guess. But one of the things this professor would do is joke when she saw me "now you can't ditch class because i saw u today!" which totally confused me, because i'm always a good student? and she knows that, so i assumed it was just her sense of humor. She was more informative, than directive- and suggested I may want to look at certain things, but never told me what exactly to do. we kept in touch after the class.. she would write things like "nice work!' on my papers but i felt ambivalent about them for some reason. idk, actually what do you guys think about this person? as in type?

So yes, post experiences you've had with teachers and professors!
 

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I always personally enjoyed classes more where the teacher or professor had some kind of interest in me. It was more fun that way, having a personal relationship with the teacher/prof rather than being some impersonal/disconnect..
YES! I've noticed that same tendency in me over the years. That's why I completely excelled in elementary school; the teachers who teach in lower grades and deal with young children generally have more of an interest in students as individuals.

Now that I'm in high school, I don't learn as much because I feel no desire to show what I'm capable of in the classroom. A few of my teachers, now several months into the school year, don't even know my name. :S

As for specific types, I'm not too sure on that. From the few teachers I have been able to type, it's been a mixed bag. The ones I would assume to be excellent, in theory, based on their personality, end up falling short of my expectations, while others who didn't necessarily fit into the theory have shocked me (pleasantly, of course).

The one thing I have noticed is that I tend to be on the same wavelength with the Ns, but that's no surprise. :D
 

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YES! I've noticed that same tendency in me over the years. That's why I completely excelled in elementary school; the teachers who teach in lower grades and deal with young children generally have more of an interest in students as individuals.

Now that I'm in high school, I don't learn as much because I feel no desire to show what I'm capable of in the classroom. A few of my teachers, now several months into the school year, don't even know my name. :S

As for specific types, I'm not too sure on that. From the few teachers I have been able to type, it's been a mixed bag. The ones I would assume to be excellent, in theory, based on their personality, end up falling short of my expectations, while others who didn't necessarily fit into the theory have shocked me (pleasantly, of course).

The one thing I have noticed is that I tend to be on the same wavelength with the Ns, but that's no surprise. :D
The trouble with teaching high school is that they train you to drill content in order to prep for college..... so it appears that several teachers (but not all) just basically want to teach like college. Though the truth is you'll have better classroom management and the kids will learn more if you make an investment with them -- even if they are being smartasses and driving you crazy.:wink:
 

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And in regard to the whole name thing... I felt horrible the other day when I called one girl "Samantha" instead of "Sarah"... I always get mixed up with names that start with the same letter (I've gotten my friends confused with naming towns this way as well)... but I felt so embarrassed and horrible I did that in class yesterday. I think I apologized to her several times after that one. :unsure:
 
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Usually the most important thing for me is whether or not I like what I'm learning.

Secondly it's the teacher. The most problems I've had, it's with teachers who teach things they aren't passionate about. They care about the students less.. I mean, how can they care, they don't have any standards.. If they cared about what they were teaching, they would have standards you know what I mean (o_o) They do things on their own time that are directly related to what they teach, so they are always creating and maintaining standards for themselves. They are always growing. Even if it's something they use for themselves, when they apply it to you, you can fight back and they let you, they don't shove the curriculum down your throat, they understand what it means for you..and it's all just more interesting. I learn so much more, about different perspectives. There's more insight and discussion to gain with a teacher like that. The others have nothing to offer, that's my honest opinion.
I had a teacher for an art class who wasn't even an artist, who didn't even make art in her free time. She even told us during a session we had where all the teachers come together to talk about themselves. She said she was just interested in organizing. Made me sick (O_O) Yea maybe she can organize non-animate objects..She also lacks the empathy to take care of real human beings. And she was always going by what she heard and saw or what she had gone through before (Se dominant maybe?).. She would get caught up in classroom dramas, was easily manipulated. She was such a mess. And if she had cared at all about her work, she would know to cut all these things out and deal with it properly. She was also the coordinator for the program I took, she was one of the two who decided who would get into the program --and she would just accept anyone who applied! Made me sick (again). I don't know how she got hired.

And on the other hand, I had a teacher who taught design and he was an artist.. but it's really hard to say, how deep it goes for him. He was always cracking jokes in class and it was the same as with my other teacher, he would easily get caught up in the drama caused by the other students and even treated others badly based on rumours, while they were innocent. He did not use his brain at all.

So yea...
empathy, passion for the subject they teach
That's the main thing for me.

I'm actually quite suspicious of university now. I don't have control over who will be teaching me. Sometimes it's hard to do the research, I always try to check the backgrounds of the teachers and there isn't always any info. Lately I just go by word of mouth, and it's for private tutors.
 

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YES! I've noticed that same tendency in me over the years. That's why I completely excelled in elementary school; the teachers who teach in lower grades and deal with young children generally have more of an interest in students as individuals.

Now that I'm in high school, I don't learn as much because I feel no desire to show what I'm capable of in the classroom. A few of my teachers, now several months into the school year, don't even know my name. :S
thegirlcandance said:
The trouble with teaching high school is that they train you to drill content in order to prep for college..... so it appears that several teachers (but not all) just basically want to teach like college. Though the truth is you'll have better classroom management and the kids will learn more if you make an investment with them -- even if they are being smartasses and driving you crazy.
The other big difference is the amount of time with students and the number of them. As a high school teacher, I see my students for 90 minutes a day for only one semester. Elementary school teachers are with one class all day for a full year. They probably also have around 30 students...in one year I have about 180.

So once again, I always have to mix in the fact that even though a lot of this is based on the teacher, but a lot of it is also based on the system.

I dug up an old post I made in this thread to kind of give my take on a good bit of this.

http://personalitycafe.com/myers-briggs-forum/26773-sensors-school-theory-2.html

teddy564339 said:
As a high school math teacher myself (albeit a young one, I've only been teaching it for four years), I totally see where you're coming from. However, I have to add some of my own input.

(This is going to be really hard to say without going on and on for pages, and plus I don't want to derail the thread...but I'll do my best to give the general idea).

On one hand, I totally agree with you. The US education system (and maybe some other countries') teaches high school math in a totally abstract way that doesn't appeal to most kids. They're never taught how it's useful, it isn't useful to a lot of them, and so it's no wonder they hate it and view it as a total waste of time.

Here's the issue I have: you're putting all of the emphasis on the teacher. Now, as a parent and community member, I can totally understand why you do that, since teachers are who you interact with, they're the ones with direct contact with your children, and they're the ones who have the most impact on your child. Parents all of the time go directly to the teachers.

But the whole side of the coin that most parents never see is how extremely bound and restricted we teachers are from doing a good job. I'm almost tempted to say that the politics of education are set up in a way to actually actively, forcefully prevent students from actual learning. I don't like conspiracy theories, but the more I teach the more it feels like everything is set up to turn kids into a mindless, drone population who doesn't think but can perform basic, mindless functions and does what they're told.


In North Carolina it's horrible. The way the standardized testing is set up is absolutely ridiculous. Kids have to pass on big test at the end in order to pass the class...they could be doing just fine in the teacher's eyes, but if they fail the test, they fail the class. And they make the test ridiculously hard, and then curve it. So the whole semester we're forced to teach to the test so that most of our kids won't fail.

That's not to mention that my job and which classes I teach are completely based on the test results of my students. My principal is obsessed with it, and she is because our district imposes that on her, because our state imposes that on the district.

And the whole thing snowballs. These kids are taught these mindless test taking habits since elementary school, so it's already been ingrained into them by the time they get to me. In my Algebra 2 class there are kids who don't know tons from Algebra 1! It's natural for everyone to forget it, but after I teach it again it should come back. If a kid fails a test I give on Algebra 1 material after I've retaught it...what else can I do with them the rest of the semester.

And getting most kids to actually think, to actually do something real...is like pulling teeth. They have been so ingrained into doing mindless work that it's a fight to get them to do something where they actually have to think for themselves. Again, this is natural to a degree, but when there are so many other pressures (a horrible set up where they have 90 minute classes, social and technological distractions, not to mention an inconsistent and ineffective discipline system), and it gets almost exhausting just to get through a day of teaching them the mindless techniques, much less fighting battles that are better for kids in the long run but mean absolutely nothing in my boss's eyes.


Now, don't get me wrong...I do know that good teachers can work with kids despite the system, and I really for the most part try my best to do that. And I'll be honest that I could potentially do more than I am...but already everything is so mentally and physically exhausting that I would be pushing myself even harder than I am.

And to be even more honest, I myself don't even know how to make the ins and outs of geometry and algebra relevant and interesting. Part of it is that there are so many tiny little details that the kids need to know for the test (instead of understanding the overall concepts so they could be put to use), and part of it is simply that no one has ever taught me any of it! High school, college, and teacher education programs never ever bother to do that, and certainly none of my bosses know it. I'd have to spend tons of time learning how to do all of that, and come up with the activities all on my own. And as much as it would be nice to, it's simply not worth the effort as long as I know that it won't help these kids past the test, which is what ultimately students, parents, politicians and my bosses all care about the most.

And I know some people think that if you're not making learning important and relevant to kids that you shouldn't be teaching.


But I guess what I'm saying is...you keep putting emphasis on the teacher, as if a "good teacher" can magically take a group of kids and inspire them to actually love math and know how to apply it. But honestly...our whole system is set up that so that even for teachers who love kids, want to help them out in life, want to teach them something real, want to get that satisfaction of actually showing kids how math is so vital and interesting....it's almost impossible.


Sorry for the rant, and I totally know where you're coming from. And I totally agree with you on how education should be if our main concern is actually teaching kids and preparing them for life. I also totally understand why you put so much emphasis on the teacher, because teachers are on the frontlines. But as someone who overall does my best and wants the same thing you do, I can't help but point out all of the things in our whole entire system that are preventing teachers from doing exactly what you're saying, because it's frustrating how people in the system create it like this and then let the teachers on the bottom of the totem pole take all of the flack from the community...they really like doing that.


(And yes, there are plenty of horrible teachers out there too, don't get me wrong. But maybe if our system was better there would be a lot more people interested in taking the job and they could afford to weed out the bad ones).


(By the way, here's one link that talks about the whole issue a little bit, a friend recently sent this to me):

http://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_rob...evolution.html
 
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The teachers I've liked have been ENXJ's, they take charge and don't let kids walk all over them. They also tend to actually be knowledgeable about their subject and PASSIONATE about what they teach.
 

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And in regard to the whole name thing... I felt horrible the other day when I called one girl "Samantha" instead of "Sarah"... I always get mixed up with names that start with the same letter (I've gotten my friends confused with naming towns this way as well)... but I felt so embarrassed and horrible I did that in class yesterday. I think I apologized to her several times after that one. :unsure:
That's perfectly understandable. Maybe my post was unclear: I don't mind them not knowing my name so much as I am bothered when they don't make an effort to remember it. Examples:

I had an art teacher in middle school who did not know my name after three years of his class, yet I was a good student and fairly good at the art projects he assigned, coming to him for advice and criticism on whatever piece I happened to be working on. He picked his favorites at the beginning of the year (usually girls, since he deemd middle school boys untrustworthy and troublemakers) and made little to no effort to connect with the rest of his students.

Contrast that experience with my current AP Language teacher. She is absolutely terrible with names and constantly mixes people up in the class. It's taken her over a year to figure out who everyone is (we all had her last year for English), but you can still see that she cares about her students. She works hard, plans excellent curriculum and follows through with a strong desire to see her students do well. It's all about the effort, for me at least. :)
 
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