Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,773 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been having these strange experiences for the last year or so... I sometimes have strong 'feelings' of being the only 'real' person around. It's like all other people are just repeating the same cycles over and over again and I'm the only one who understands or even sees these cycles, it's as though the others are just objects or androids to me. I also feel disconnected from my body at times, like I'm not really there.

So my questions to you guys are the following:
-Do you also have these kind of feelings/experiences on a regular basis? And if so, how do you cope with them?
-Does this have anything to do with me being an INTP? And if so, how can we explain this behaviour within the MBTI theory (or outside the MBTI theory if you think it's not normal for an INTP)?
-Should I worry about this? Is it normal for me to have these experiences?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
It's like all other people are just repeating the same cycles over and over again and I'm the only one who understands or even sees these cycles, it's as though the others are just objects or androids to me.
You do realize that you are repeating these same cycles as well, don't you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,773 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You do realize that you are repeating these same cycles as well, don't you?
Of course I do, but that doesn't really change the experience. I'm literally speaking about depersonalization as a psychological phenomenon... Not about the thought of it but the actual experience. It's not only that I think the others are different or loose from me but I really feel disconnected. I sometime even rationalize these experiences by saying things like you just said (I'll think :"I'm the same as them." or something like that) but that usually doesn't help or it even worsens my feeling of being mechanical and disconnected myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I still think this way from time to time, but I always have to tell myself exactly what you do "I'm the same as them....". The last time I went through it was a few months ago, and I ended up in a depressed state for about 2 days, until I snapped myself out of it. I even wrote a little essay on that I posted today - "Where did we go wrong?".

I used to have an issue with this. I would feel alone; even though I am surrounded by people. I would see life as I saw it - a series of boring, repetitive tasks that we have to endure for ~80 years, and I couldn't understand how people seemed so happy. It was like... how could they not see what they were doing? Wake up, get pretty, go to work, come home, 'entertain' themselves for a few hours, go to sleep. Lather, rinse, repeat.

My wife started getting with me after about a week of me calling referring to the general populace as 'stupid'. She'd want me to go to a party or something, and my response would be along the lines of "Gah, and what am I supposed to do there? Pretend to like all the stupid people there, babbling about whatever bs gossip/drama they could come up?"

While it may or may not be the best advice, I learned to ignore it. And I did that by realizing that I am one of "them", and I repeat those same repetitive tasks on a daily basis as well. I hold myself in high regard, so maybe that helped me get over it. And once I did that, my overall happiness returned. Who knows, though? We're all weird.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
749 Posts
It's just a bit of harmless solipsism. You're realizing you experience the world ideologically (in the philosophical sense), ie, the connections in your own mind have conjured this for you, and thusly, you've created the entire universe as you know it in your own head.

I know the feeling can overwhelm and make you feel bad. I went off on this with a good friend of mine and he popped me in the jaw pretty good and said, "Did you conjure that one? Felt pretty real didn't it? And at any rate, who gives a shit?" Point is, you've got an existence, who gives a fuck if you're the only person or not. I hate to only stand on pragmatic ground here, but you've gotta just accept the reality of it and enjoy your life as though everyone was real, or else the people who don't seem very real to you will find a way to make themselves seem very, very real.

Also remember that even though the world is conjured in your brain, that experience you get comes from somewhere that you don't control, so sit back and enjoy the ride, whatever it really is.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solipsism

^ Learning it's well documented and that many others think this way made me feel a lot better about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,773 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, I'm glad to hear that this is a somewhat 'normal' experience... but it's kind of depressing to hear that there's not really a single standard way of coping with these experiences. It's not that I think it's altogether strange to think like this, I know dissociation is a very normal mechanism in human thinking and in the way we perceive the world. What worries me is that the frequency and the lenght of duration of these experiences have become higher in the past year... I now feel like this at least once a day for at least 10 minutes in most cases. But you guys may be right, perhaps I should just see it as an adventure or a good thing (or at least as a normal way of perceiving the world).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
It sounds like you're under some form of stress.
Take a look at your life and see when these things happen. Note your triggers and deal with them accordingly.

Ten minutes a day doesn't sound too bad.
I've got one friend that depersonalized for about a week at a time, for several months.
I depersonalize in highly-stressful situations, usually involving anger. This may happen for several hours at a time, depending on the situation and its after-effects.

I did learn a technique though. I call it "Breaking through the void." Keep in mind that, when you do this, intense emotions WILL spring up. I suggest you take a look at yourself and discern the best possible way of dealing with those emotions in a productive way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,397 Posts
Is this why INTP's are said to "doubt reality" a lot? I can't say I ever have (my Si may be tertiary, but it's strong enough to shut that shit off) but still...makes sense. Heh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
I often contemplate if my life is a dream or not... or if I'm unconscious somewhere else perhaps. I would never admit that to anyone else though because they would just think I'm crazy. Maybe I am. I sometimes have out-of-body experiences. I call those, "trances." I first experienced the feeling when I was 11 while looking in a mirror. It's as if you can separate your mind from your body. I have a hard time accepting my life because I feel like I don't know what my purpose is or if I even have one. Life is so complex. haha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
Yeah, when I stumbled into solipsism I thought the same things.

If you want some real dissociation/a mindfuck, ingest some ketamine. Reality will be refreshing after that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Trainwreck

·
Registered
Joined
·
743 Posts
You are the only real person. You're the star of our experiment. We've induced you into a longterm dream-state wherein we inject this world, that is, the world as it was two centuries ago, into your mind and observe your in-dream behaviors as well as your cognitive functioning, all in real-time. Of course you did agree to this; you were more than enthusiastic to give your life up for science, for a few years anyways. We've learned so much already. We're in the process of completely rebuilding the field of psychology from the ground up, and we've only just begun.

You may ask yourself why we're revealing this to you. Well, we first noticed some discrepancies in your memory readings about a year ago. Without getting too technical, it seems our methods could have used some further ironing out before we put them into practice. But instead of pulling the plug we decided to capitalize and make it part of the experiment. We've been studying what effect feelings of dissociation have on the mood and functioning of every day life. Now that we have sufficient data, we're going to shift to studying your reaction to the idea that your very existence is nothing but a dream. Will you believe this seemingly anonymous post? Unlikely (and even if you did there would be no way to wake yourself). But will the thought linger? Will the idea, the fringe possibility of its truthfulness, remain in your subconscious? Just how easy is it for an intelligent, logically thinking individual to shove irrational but daunting thoughts out of their mind completely? How will this affect you, consciously and subconsciously, if at all?

Rest assured that whatever you do believe, you're in no danger and you won't remember anything when the experiment is over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
This happens to me on a regular basis. I've found that the only thing that can bring me back is doing something that restores my faith in humanity. Most recently, I've been reading philosophy. It is very reassuring to read the major works because I've pondered much of the information discussed in the works already in my mind so I instantly feel a connection to history and society.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,773 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have been under a lot of stress for the last few months or so, but the increase in dissociative experiences already began before these stressful times. Now that I think about this more carefully I also see a possible connection to an operation I had about the same time the dissociative experiences started to become more frequent and intense, in fact the dissociative experience that followed my operation was probably the longest I have had so far (about 3 days long). However, the stress of that operation has long since gone away and I didn't experience the operation as traumatic... When I'm having these experiences it's not like I'm having a dream or an out-of-body experience; I know that I'm awake and I'm not outside my body but trapped inside my body. Others seem to be mechanical and my body seems to be mechanical too. It's like my body's in the auto-pilot mode and I have no real control over it. I can feel empty, enlightened or anxious in these moments and they occur spontaneously. The duration of the experiences vary, but are usually between 10 minutes and several hours long; they occur almost every day and sometimes even two or more times a day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
So my questions to you guys are the following:
-Do you also have these kind of feelings/experiences on a regular basis? And if so, how do you cope with them?
Yes. I don't cope, I embrace. I like this.
-Does this have anything to do with me being an INTP? And if so, how can we explain this behaviour within the MBTI theory (or outside the MBTI theory if you think it's not normal for an INTP)?
INTP, and probably with being a 5 too. Detachment is natural for a Ti dom as the world appears to them in the form of impersonal principles and rules that need to be analyzed and structured. Ti naturally overlooks the more "human" elements of things and people which is why everything can seem extremely robotic.

-Should I worry about this? Is it normal for me to have these experiences?
I don't think so, as long as it doesn't get in the way of you making connections or interacting with the world in the manner you'd like to. Doesn't bother me at all. Like I said, I like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Sometimes, yes, especially more since I've removed myself from my typical environment where it was easier to shield myself from others. I'm studying abroad right now and I have learned a lot about social cues and expectations, but naturally this leads me to reject them even more. I am stubborn in that I recognize the need for people to identify and share themselves with others, the same feeling that I get from time to time, but I refuse to do this with those who don't understand that reality is more than what we see, and that this inner reality and the network of ideas that create it is way more important. This is maybe foolish since I can't expect others to think the way I do, which is also true, and necessary, and good (sometimes). Perhaps this is the effect of not being able to connect with a lot of younger people who have different priorities than I do.

Things that I do to cope: I play mind numbing games, smoke pot, read, and when the boyfriend comes to visit, I'll probably be having a lot of sex, too. But I notice that all of these things seem to disassociate me further... I think the only thing that bothers me is having to deal with others judging me wrongly, not from the dissociative feeling itself. Maybe the dissociative feeling is itself our normal way of being (as described in INTP) and the only times we feel this is odd is when others can't share the experience. I find a lot of comfort, also, in reading poetry and philosophy that invokes a similar p.o.v. Solipsism was mentioned above, but I also like Plato's idea that a perfect world exists elsewhere and this is merely a crappy copy of it, or the modernist movement with its obsession with the exotic, art for itself, the cult of perfection, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Happens sometimes (derealization mostly, depersonalisation being quite rare).

If I want to try to "leave" it :

-Apnea
-Physical activity
-Provoking emotions (like thinking about something that makes me angry/agressive/compassionate, and focusing on it until I start to feel "involved".)
-Doing something new and unplanned (slow method, but the transition feels more "natural" and healthy (if that makes sense))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
I believe we see things that others don't or can't so our reality is a globle conntinum. When others insist on a static miopic( reality sometimes) view we tend to ,as a defence mechanism, to dis. . We long for understanding which is suppose to lead to acceptance and belonging so when we aren't it creates both an internal and external illogical conflict which we can't reconcile by ourselves. Find someone who understands you and you will find yourself less dissociative. It is hard for people to bend thier minds for the purpose of enlightenment and thus transendance. It is much easier for most to only focus on there here and now because that's what most have been conditioned to do. Just because they don't doesn't mean we can't or it's wrong we just have to eccept that reality yet reconcile it with our perseived logical possibilities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
988 Posts
It's the most common state of thought during my planned year as the star student of the new school I'm attending. When I'm not thinking of other things, depersonalization or disassociation is a good way to while away the time. I spend a good half hour or so like that, and, when left alone, I lapse into depersonalization to pass whatever time I have on my hands. Sometimes I think I'm really just experiencing a dream world like the one I experience in my dreams, and my real body is in a diabetic coma in Ottawa, and has been since the night I fell asleep before we were to 'leave' Canada. Therefore, the people around me and my 'personality' technically don't exist, since it was formed in response to my experiences.

Then there's the what-if: what if there isn't a 'real' reality outside this one? If my observation of reality is subjective, then there wouldn't necessarily have to be a 'real' world outside this 'dream world', would there? Could I exist only in this dream world, and have it still be imagined? The automatron people around me wouldn't come as a shock, then.

I've practiced another option, though. Stop considering other people as conscious, and simply program your mind to deal with them as if they are the hypothetical philosophical zombies on a daily basis. It's easy.
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top