Personality Cafe banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a scientific question, what would it mean if Rain falls up ?

I realize that it's not something that you'd encounter just any day, but according to physics, what would it take to make rain fall up ?

I am really counting on you intellectuals out there to enlighten me !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
If a large planet somehow got very close to the Earth, and if that planet was heavy enough to overcome the gravitational pull of the Earth on the rain, then I guess the rain would fall away from the Earth towards that planet.

However that would at the same time pull the entire atmosphere of the Earth away, so the rain "falling up" would be a one time event. Not to mention that an encounter like that would seriously disturb the orbit of both the Earth and the Moon, possible causing collisions or even flinging the Earth into a completely different orbit.

So basically, making rain fall up would require some kind of cataclysmic event.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If rain fell up everything else would be falling up with it.

And then it wouldn't really be "up" anymore.
Then, it wouldn't be falling up at all.
But what if ?
What if it was only the rain that fell up ?

It's a simple question that requires a no-so-simple answer !

And that is why I need someone who specializes in physics.

P.S. Thank you for your post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
Rain falls up all the time and the technical term is an "updraft". Tornadoes in particular will recycle their own rain first dumping a ton in front of them and then picking it up as they leave. If you ever see it rain so hard it looks like you would drown in the stuff, duck into the nearest bathtub or basement because the tornado is upon you.
 

·
Grand Inquisitor
Joined
·
8,120 Posts
Then, it wouldn't be falling up at all.
But what if ?
What if it was only the rain that fell up ?

It's a simple question that requires a no-so-simple answer !

And that is why I need someone who specializes in physics.

P.S. Thank you for your post.
It does have a simple answer. The answer is it wouldn't make any sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Rain falls up all the time and the technical term is an "updraft". Tornadoes in particular will recycle their own rain first dumping a ton in front of them and then picking it up as they leave. If you ever see it rain so hard it looks like you would drown in the stuff, duck into the nearest bathtub or basement because the tornado is upon you.
makes sense to me.

You'v given me something to thing about !
Thank you for enlightening me.


I wonder however if there are any other possibilities that would make rain fall up...

Not saying that I'm not satisfied with this answer though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
The atmosphere is a 100 mile deep ocean with all kinds of weird behavior. At 70,000 feet there is a 15 foot layer of almost sea level air pressure at 70f. Clouds produce gamma rays that create lightening, fish eggs are so small they can be taken up high into the stratosphere merely by evaporation and hatch raining fish down on people. Reality is not only stranger than fiction, but funnier too.
 

·
MOTM Feb 2010
Joined
·
4,773 Posts
Maybe instead of a physicist, you need to ask a Jungian analyst.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,556 Posts
Rain could fall up, given the correct level of electrostatic imbalance.

Consider the school science experiment where you rub a plastic rod then hold it against tap water, and it causes the water to curve towards, or away from, the rod.

If it can be done on a small scale, it could in theory be done on a large sale too, so rain is drawn up instead.

Almost impossible to really do though! In reality, with an electrostatic imbalance, you would probably just get lightning, which is essentially what happens to restore the overall electric equilibrium in the environment - a cloud has too many electrons so it gives some to the ground.

A more possible way to make rain fall up would be for a planetary body to pass close by. But then, as others have said, everything else would be floating upwards too. I actually took an Astronomy course recently where we calculated how close the moon would have to be before it started to pull things up. It was about 300km, or 3000km, or something like that. However it was so close that it would cause both the earth and the moon to break up and settle into one big mass anyway, so rain would eventually start to fall down again.

I guess it could be argued that rain does fall up - during high tides. Seeing as sea water is just rain in its final form. Again this is caused by the gravity of the moon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Rain could fall up, given the correct level of electrostatic imbalance.

Consider the school science experiment where you rub a plastic rod then hold it against tap water, and it causes the water to curve towards, or away from, the rod.

If it can be done on a small scale, it could in theory be done on a large sale too, so rain is drawn up instead.

Almost impossible to really do though! In reality, with an electrostatic imbalance, you would probably just get lightning, which is essentially what happens to restore the overall electric equilibrium in the environment - a cloud has too many electrons so it gives some to the ground.

A more possible way to make rain fall up would be for a planetary body to pass close by. But then, as others have said, everything else would be floating upwards too. I actually took an Astronomy course recently where we calculated how close the moon would have to be before it started to pull things up. It was about 300km, or 3000km, or something like that. However it was so close that it would cause both the earth and the moon to break up and settle into one big mass anyway, so rain would eventually start to fall down again.

I guess it could be argued that rain does fall up - during high tides. Seeing as sea water is just rain in its final form. Again this is caused by the gravity of the moon.

This is the kind of post I'v been waiting for !
You really have given me something good here !

I am still curious though about what others thoughts about this will be. (As long as they don't go explaining to me about how impossible it is)
 

·
Registered
INTJ
Joined
·
1,508 Posts
The word "fall" implies a movement towards the object generating gravity. The word "up" means the direction away from the earth. So, as long as Earth is the only object generating significant gravity, no, you cannot fall up. Of course, the moon also pulls water, and a second planetoid next to earth could cause water to fall onto its surface (falling up from the persepective of Earth) as previous posters have said.

I was looking for some conditions in which water might be less dense than a gas. Turns, out you can't achieve water falling up that way. There are no liquids less dense than any gas under any conditions. BUT there are solids that are less dense than air that will "fall up" in normal atmospheric conditions. Aerogel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,101 Posts
Rain does fall up in intense updrafts in the case of a hail event.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,101 Posts
No asteroid could sufficiently cancel out earth gravity to cause even raindrops to go up. No planet, even of earth's size could cause rain drops to rise, nor even a multi-earth mass planet, because the effects of gravitational mechanics would cause impact to occur within milliseconds of the time when gravity on earth would be nullified.

IMO, Earth would actually be breaking up and rain drops would be turned to steam before the mass concentration of earth lost its attraction to the water drops.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
No asteroid could sufficiently cancel out earth gravity to cause even raindrops to go up. No planet, even of earth's size could cause rain drops to rise, nor even a multi-earth mass planet, because the effects of gravitational mechanics would cause impact to occur within milliseconds of the time when gravity on earth would be nullified.

IMO, Earth would actually be breaking up and rain drops would be turned to steam before the mass concentration of earth lost its attraction to the water drops.

Hmm....
Very interesting !

But now I only know about Two ways that rain could fall up.

Thank you for your input !
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top