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I'm just curious as to what anybody knows about the academic study of Family and Consumer Sciences. The classes seem really interesting (i.e. interior design, relationships studies etc.) but I don't know what exactly people do with their degrees. However, being an INFP I suppose I have no idea where I'll end up anyway. I've considered every major under the sun, this is just one of my most recent interests.
 

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I've never heard of it but I wikipediaed it and found this: Family and Consumer Science I think most Americans would know it as something like "home economics". I don't really know much about what careers it could lead to but I'll bump this thread up and see if anyone else has something to contribute. Welcome to the INFP forum btw :)
 

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My advice... go with your gut! You never know what might happen, but your instincts are telling you this would be interesting to study, so I think you should go for it!

Also... if this really is like "Home Economics", as it used to be called, my sister majored in that back in the 90's, in one of the last programs still called that, and basically ended up being really well trained for any number of jobs - seamstress, event planner, food/meal consultant, etc. In her program, they went into fashion design, meal planning, how to set up a large-scale event, etc. It really would be a good jumping off point for anything in any of those fields. She currently freelances with sewing clothes for people, but she really would be able to jump into any of those other arenas as well.
 

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To me, it sounds fluffy, but then I can understand why it exists. Maybe it is of more relevance of the US culture, if presuming that you are from the US and the way that a family unit now is pretty nuclear to many extents, and it may be a case of bringing back the basics of family dynamics, and consumerism and value etc.

To me, I was brought up in a particular environment and culture where this exists, and we do not need to learn how to be a family. It exists by trial and error. You just trust your gut instincts and you adjust. There is no science to it.

I guess you got to ask yourself at the end of the day, what is the value of this study and if it will be of some kind of benefit to someone else, and if indeed gaining this degree or course will indeed add value to society as a whole. It sounds like it can add value, but... who would want anyone else to actually tell them how to raise their families ? Everybody probably has an idea, but they may not appreciate others telling them how to do so. But then, if your background was from a broken home or family and never knew what the value of a steady family is, then you may see what, why, and how...
 

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You could always go into family and consumer education. Then you'd teach some of those classes. My high school had a pretty decent family and consumer sciences department so we could take classes such as interior design, relationships matter, foods. If that doesn't float your boat I'd suggest picking an area in that interdisciplinary that you're most interested in: such as interior design, nutrition/dietetics or child development. Or if relationships is what interests you the most you could always major in psych then get your masters and then you could be a marriage counselor or something of the like.
 
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