Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I loooove documentaries. I don't think I've ever seen a thread on them, not even in other forums. I thought that if I love them, maybe some of you do to. So do share! Okay here are some of my favorites:

The End of Suburbia
Food Inc.
King Corn
No Impact Man
Frontline: Digital Nation
The Garden (about a community garden in East L.A.)
The 11th Hour
Billy Bragg and Wilco: Man in the Sand
No End in Sight
The Goebbels Experiment
All kinds of Nature documentaries
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Earthlings, though it is difficult to watch.
Anything nature based
I hadn't seen that one, so I went to Youtube right now to see what is was. I watched just the very first segment, and already have tears in my eyes.

I see the holocaust every day. I live in a rural community surrounded by many dairies and feed lots. I smell their misery from my home all the time. It's unendurable. We're moving from here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,156 Posts
I hadn't seen that one, so I went to Youtube right now to see what is was. I watched just the very first segment, and already have tears in my eyes.

I see the holocaust every day. I live in a rural community surrounded by many dairies and feed lots. I smell their misery from my home all the time. It's unendurable. We're moving from here.
This film is why I switched from vegetarian to vegan. If I were to be honest, I would admit a large degree if guilt due to not being able recognize this wrong sooner, and to not becoming a vegetarian/vegan at an earlier age.

Another documentary I enjoyed is Ken Burns' jazz series. On top of this he has managed to compile some amazing music CDs encompassing the wide spectrum of jazz. I particularly recommend the Sarah Vaughan (easily in my top ten) and Dizzy Gillespie CDs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
This film is why I switched from vegetarian to vegan. If I were to be honest, I would admit a large degree if guilt due to not being able recognize this wrong sooner, and to not becoming a vegetarian/vegan at an earlier age.

Another documentary I enjoyed is Ken Burns' jazz series. On top of this he has managed to compile some amazing music CDs encompassing the wide spectrum of jazz. I particularly recommend the Sarah Vaughan (easily in my top ten) and Dizzy Gillespie CDs.
Yeah, it made me feel incredibly guilty. I used to be very conscientious about my diet, but life got hard and it became more difficult financially to sustain an ethical diet. After this though, I don't care what it costs, I'm not eating factory farmed meat anymore. I knew all these things, but it had never been shown to me in such graphic detail. I could kick myself for having gotten so lazy about it. One thing I've always been very conscientious about are pets. I'm always rescuing strays. Sometimes I keep them and sometimes I give them to people I trust, or no-kill shelters. We always spay and neuter as well. And I stay far away from breeders or pet shops. So I'm bad on one count and good on another I guess.

I love jazz too. I'm not sure if I've seen any of the Ken Burns series, I'll have to see it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Century of the self(can't even believe i sat through all of this, ALL OF THIS I SAY)


Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, changed the perception of the human mind and its workings. His influence on the twentieth century is generally considered profound. The series describes the ways public relations and politicians have utilized Freud's theories during the last 100 years for the "engineering of consent".

Freud himself and his nephew Edward Bernays, who was the first to use psychological techniques in public relations, are discussed. Freud's daughter Anna Freud, a pioneer of child psychology, is mentioned in the second part, as is one of the main opponents of Freud's theories, Wilhelm Reich, in the third part.

Along these general themes, The Century of the Self asks deeper questions about the roots and methods of modern consumerism, representative democracy, commodification and its implications. It also questions the modern way we see ourselves, the attitudes to fashion and superficiality.

The business and, increasingly, the political world uses psychological techniques to read and fulfill our desires, to make their products or speeches as pleasing as possible to us. Curtis raises the question of the intentions and roots of this fact. Where once the political process was about engaging people's rational, conscious minds, as well as facilitating their needs as a society, the documentary shows how by employing the tactics of psychoanalysis, politicians appeal to irrational, primitive impulses that have little apparent bearing on issues outside of the narrow self-interest of a consumer population. He cites Paul Mazer, a Wall Street banker working for Lehman Brothers in the 1930s: "We must shift America from a needs- to a desires-culture. People must be trained to desire, to want new things, even before the old have been entirely consumed. [...] Man's desires must overshadow his needs."

In Episode 4 the main subjects are Philip Gould and Matthew Freud, the great grandson of Sigmund, a PR consultant. They were part of the efforts during the nineties to bring the Democrats in the US and New Labour in the United Kingdom back into power. Adam Curtis explores the psychological methods they now massively introduced into politics. He also argues that the eventual outcome strongly resembles Edward Bernays vision for the "Democracity" during the 1939 New York World's Fair. - Overview from wiki(was better than imdb's)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
I enjoy watching them... but honestly, almost every single one is so one-sided that it's difficult to watch. I think it would be nice to have a documentary that showed both sides of an argument in a relatively equal light. It would actually add credibility if they presented an opposing viewpoint sometimes... rather than beating their argument into your head over and over and over again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I watch way too many documentaries

My favorites:

Please Vote For Me
Food Inc.
Zizek!
A Place Called Chiapas
Unmistaken Child
Crude
The Great Happiness Space

Politically-charged documentaries are obviously one-sided, but I think it is always interesting to see one's perspective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I guess if you want to see the other side, you have to watch the other guy's documentary. Honestly, everyone is biased and it's going to show in their work. That's the whole point, they want to get their point of view accross.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SarahWilliams

·
Banned
Joined
·
89 Posts
I enjoy watching them... but honestly, almost every single one is so one-sided that it's difficult to watch. I think it would be nice to have a documentary that showed both sides of an argument in a relatively equal light. It would actually add credibility if they presented an opposing viewpoint sometimes... rather than beating their argument into your head over and over and over again.
so true!


Gasland
And Incident at Loch Ness (even though it's a mockumentary)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I enjoy watching them... but honestly, almost every single one is so one-sided that it's difficult to watch. I think it would be nice to have a documentary that showed both sides of an argument in a relatively equal light. It would actually add credibility if they presented an opposing viewpoint sometimes... rather than beating their argument into your head over and over and over again.
beautifully said, much respect to anyone who thinks like this ; )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,647 Posts
Hmmm... I thought there would be some general documentary thread, a bit of a flaw actually...

Some of my favourites (and trying not to plagiarize the ones already mentioned) I would like to add Zizek's Pervert's Guide to Cinema, the Corporation, Examined Life, Super High Me, DMT - The Spirit Molecule, Jesus Camp, Religulous (even though Bill Maher ends up bible-bashing rather abusively) and Zeitgeist (the first one, not Addendum)

Looking forward to more suggestions, great thread :]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Super Size Me
The Manufactured World (I think that was the name)
Who Killed the Electric Car
The Airships
An Inconvenient Truth
Coast (LOVE this series)
No Intelligence Allowed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,254 Posts
I love historical documentaries. I watched so many WWII documentaries back when the History Channel was basically the Hitler Channel, I've definitely had my fill of the WWII era.

I've been watching a series about the history of the Germans, the aptly titled Die Deutschen on the ZDF website. These are really well done, so if you understand German I recommend them highly.

I get bored by documentaries about technology (ugh, Modern Marvels?) or anything about jobs that people do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Super Size Me
The Manufactured World (I think that was the name)
Who Killed the Electric Car
The Airships
An Inconvenient Truth
Coast (LOVE this series)
No Intelligence Allowed

I really liked the two that I bolded above. Both are favorites of mine. I've been wanting to see Who Killed the Electric Car, just haven't got around to it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: INXX

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
I really liked the two that I bolded above. Both are favorites of mine. I've been wanting to see Who Killed the Electric Car, just haven't got around to it.
Yeah, I think we had to wait some time for that one to become available on LoveFilm (UK version of NetFlix). I was just thinking of another one we liked: James May's 20th Century, I especially liked the part where he is riding in the moon buggy and talks about whether or not the moon landing was faked. I won't say more, don't want to spoil the funny bit as only James May can do with just a facial expression. ROFL
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top