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What is all this Ne, Fi, etc., etc? I'm guessing that the e is for extroverted, and the i is for introverted? And F would be Feeling, N would be iNtuition, etc? But if that's the case, I don't understand how someone could have both Fe and Fi. Will somebody please explain this to me?
 

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Okay, Fi is your emotional and moral center for yourself, your "code of ethics" that you live by, basically.
Fe is your emotional and moral center in context of the group. It's caring about them, honoring their values, etc.
Ni is your intuitive, "gut instinct" sort of inner feelings/vibes about what your should do.
Ne is your intuitive instincts based on patterns you see around you, noticing things that are not obvious about your surroundings, the hidden, deeper things.
Does that make sense at all?
 

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Thank you. Are there more? And what do they mean?
There's Si, Se, Ti, and Te, but these are my lesser used functions, so I don't know them as well.

Se is observing and appreciating the details of your immediate surroundings, that which you observe with your sense at the present, the things immediately available.
Si is relating that stuff to things you already know, your existing experiences, etc.
Te is more about ordering, sorting, and structure. It's uh, analyzing and classifying the stuff going on around you for maximum effectiveness in accomplishing your goals.
Ti seems to be more about logical selections - it's being able to pick the exact right word to express a concept, being able to define the distinctions between things, etc.

Again, I have no idea if that made sense.
 

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Te = eeeewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww!!!!!!
Rofl because Te is theoretically your fourth most used function.

F and T are the judging functions, N and S are the perceiving functions.
P means your main perceiving function (N) is extraverted.
I means your first function is introverted.
So an INFP's main cognitive functions are Fi, Ne, Si, Te. and then after that is Fe, Ni, Se, Ti. But you hardly use your last four functions. Since how can you use both Fi (judging things against your own personal morals) and Fe(using the groups morals)?
Allegedly people start their life using their first function most of the time and then as they grow older they start using the other three main functions more so they become more balanced ^-^.
 
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Old Man
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In the same way that Fi creates a code of ethics and values, Ti creates a code of internal logic that is not affected by outside sources. Both Fi and Ti are subjective internal systems of dealing with things.

Te and Fe both deal with the outside sources, taking the objective logic and values.


Personally, in my own little backtrot of MBTI: I've found that functions of the same catagory and i/e scale evolve into one another, and are the same. They work in different orders, but reach the same conclusions.

(Example: Ne = Se, Ni = Si, Te = Fe)
 

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Those are simply shorthand abbreviations for the cognitive functions.

Example:
Fi = introverted feeling
Fe= exroverted feeling

You pretty much already caught onto the pattern. Basically, there are 8 cognitive functions, and every person uses all 8 to some extent, but MBTI assigns a top 4 to each type.

For example, the INFP's top 4 functions are Fi Ne Si Te. That means, in theory, we don't use Fe Ni Se Ti much at all. Of our top 4 functions, the latter two are inferior, meaning they are used much less than the first two and often they are "weaker" in capability when used. The 4 letters which make up a type basically refer to your top 2 main functions, which is what really forms your personality, as those top 2 will be what your brain defaults to when thinking (as cognitive function is NOT consciously preferred, but a matter of orientation). Your top 2 functions are always one perceiving function and one judging, and they are oriented opposite ways, meaning one is introverted & the other is extroverted.

The first letter I/E determines whether your dominant function is introverted or extroverted, which also shows whether YOU are introverted or extrovrted. The second letter N/S determines your main perceiving or P function. Your third letter, T/F, determines your main judging or J function. The last letter, J/P, determines whether your main extroverted function is the judging or perceiving one. And that's where it gets tricky. For introverts, this means their dominant function is actually the reverse of the last letter. For example, INFPs are P types because our main extroverted function is iNtuition, or Ne, but our dominant function is actually the introverted judging function Feeling, or Fi.

In referring to functions, people will also refer to their "position", which run in this order: dominant, auxiliary, tertiary and inferior. Once again, the 4 letters only refer to your dominant & auxiliary, or your top 2 main functions. When referring to the 4 functions that are not a part of your type, people may call them your "shadow" functions.

Check out this site for decent & brief descriptions of all the functions:
Understanding the Eight Jungian Cognitive Processes / Eight Functions Attitudes

If you really want to understand each function in depth (and get away from the over-simplified stereotypes), then I suggest checking out Jung's Psychological Types.
 

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Subterranean Homesick Alien
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But if that's the case, I don't understand how someone could have both Fe and Fi. Will somebody please explain this to me?
I don't think that you can have both Fe and Fi or Te and Ti...etc...etc...whatever.
But I think that certain function processes can mimic others. That's why type is said to not be based on behavior only.

I really like the idea of 'function attitudes'. In fact, I prefer that. According to that, Ne is not merely all this stuff about patterns and whatnot, it's an outlook that encourages experimentation with the outside world.
There used to be a really good site that explained this, but for some reason, it's not up anymore. You can read this article, though: http://personalitycafe.com/myers-briggs-forum/24032-intro-function-theory-more-detailed-descriptions-each-function-attitude.html
 
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