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Discussion Starter #1
I have been writing prolifically my entire life and I recently decided to look back and type my characters over the years (I transfer files over from computer to computer just for reasons like this) to see if I can find any trends. I realize my favorite characters to write are IxTJs 5w6 and they always have been.

I used to write a lot of TJ characters in general, almost exclusively at one point. Interestingly (at least to me) the amount that I wrote INFPs, enneatype 4's and females tended to correspond with my self-confidence at the time up until recently.

Examining my three most recent stories, all just in stages of planning from oldest to newest:

Story 1: A fantasy story
Female ESTJ 6w5 protagonist, with a male ISFJ 9w1 love interest and my favorite character to draw and write of the main trio, a male ENTJ 3w2. The ENTJ and ISFJ had a very close, unspoken dynamic. The villain in this instance was a jaded ISTJ.

Story 2: Another fantasy story
Female INFP ?w? protagonist (She was very shakily formed. Either 4w5 or 1w2, I wasn't sure which was higher in her tritype), with a male ISFJ 2w3 love interest and an INTJ 5w6 secondary love interest. The family of the protagonist included her ESFJ 3w2 mom and ESTP 7w8 brother, who was meant to be a main character but quickly grew into a side character. The focus of the story was primarily on the growth of the connection between the INFP 4w5 protagonist and her best friend, an ENTJ 8w7. The main villain is an INFJ 9w1.

Story 3: A children's story with the same tone as A Little Prince, A Wrinkle in Time, Coraline etc.
Female INFP 4w3 protagonist. Her mom is an ISTJ 1w2, her dad is an ESFP 7w8. She has an older sister, ESTP 3w2, a younger sister, ISFJ 6w7, and a younger brother, INTP 5w6. Her mentor is an ENFJ 9w1.

So yeah, I sort of need to fit in some other unused types in there! That's enough rambling about me though, what trends have you guys noticed?
 

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I always try to find something new to explore with each character. My type list generally covers the entire spectrum but the ones who get the least attention are probably Si dom/aux just because I need to pay a lot more attention to keep them on track and 'in character'.

My favourite characters are ESFP, INFJ, ENTP, ISTP, INTJ, ISTJ... Mostly intuitives, yeah.

Generally with the major characters they kind of stem from an element of myself that I want to explore. This doesn't impact their functions or personality type though. There is a trend though that I don't have any xNFP characters, possibly because that just seems so boring for me to explore something that's too close to me. When I isolate something like my anxiety or my impatience or my love of adventure and feed that into a character they end up nothing like me and yet entirely relatable.
 
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As far as main characters, I think I tend to write ISFJs, INFJs or INFPs, though I did write a few ESFJs/ESFPs when I was younger. But I honestly don't really consider MBTI when creating characters. I'm not a big outliner, so personality types form as I get into the story. Writing introverts is definitely my default mode, though.
 

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I've noticed that my main characters are always a lot like me. I have a very difficult time typing them because I can't even type myself, but they seem ISTJ, ISTP, or IxFP. I find it much more difficult to write as an extrovert or intuitive.

My most successful characters tend to exhibit negative traits of mine, but I usually bring them out and explore them in greater detail than I do with mine. I think I use writing as a means of introspection.

Minor characters that I've made are much more flat and probably encompass all the types. I've written a ton of different love interests, friends, enemies, etc.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
@grumpytiger
Bear in mind this is a book meant for children, so the morals are a bit on the nose. Upon reading through the story again to answer the question, the character was clearly written to be an introvert, so I'm not sure why I typed her incorrectly above. So yeah, she's an INFJ, not an ENFJ.

The INFJ is a gentle elderly woman who lives on her own in the middle of the forest nursing injured animals and tending to a literal spirit garden. She saves the main character who had injured herself trying to please her parents and offers her tea and biscuits to comfort the MC while she dresses her wounds.

The main character explains the reason behind her injury.

The INFJ responds that adults often forget what it was like to be a child and expect children to behave the same as they do know, not as they did as a child. She says that nobody else can tell us what our limits are. It is implied that she was pushed into being more outgoing and broke down as a result. She says that it is okay to push your limits to a certain extent so that you can grow, but that the MC should learn where her limits are and trust them, that it's okay to become tired, weak or overwhelmed and that it happens to everyone.

That's what I've written so far of the scenes she is in, anyways. The goal is for the MC to come to her for advice and for the MC to come to learn that she doesn't necessarily have to conform and she should think for herself rather than just accepting what she is told.
 

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Looking at mbti alone, I have quite a variety of characters. While it could probably be argued that I have more characters on the Fe-Ti and Ne-Si axis than the other two axis (and that the majority of the characters who aren't are ISFPs or ISTJs), I'm pretty evenly split on extroversion and introversion, intuition and sensing. I guess from a mbti standpoint, if you're looking for a degree of correlation, a lot of my female characters are T types and a lot of my male characters are F types
When it comes to enneagram type however... That when things get a bit blocky. Looking through the plot lines I have created and can remember, I'd stand to say that the vast majority of my characters are head types or gut types (excluding 8). I have a couple of heart type core characters inter dispersed, but many of them (especially the 3 cores) I ended up killing off pretty quickly, and the 4 and 2 cores I can count on my fingers (which says a lot since I have lots of characters). I think I have a grand total of 3 eights, and two of those characters are debatabley not even 8s. Instinctual varients are a bit more mixed, but still mostly sx blind (I wonder why). I suppose the lack of variety here is because I don't really focus on creating diverse characters, just ones I can deconstruct and use to play with different ideas and scenarios

With my most recent stories (which are fairly connected because they all but one occur in the same universe), the only trend I find is T female, F male, and basically all head types:

Story 1: Kind of a fantastical two arc story revolving around an female ESTP 7w8 (738 sx/so) and her love interest a male ENFJ 6w7 (629 so/sp) and then a male ENTP 7w6 (729 so/sp) and his first love interest, an ISTJ 5w6 (514 sx/sp) and a secondary love interest, an ISFP 6w7 (649 sx/so). The villains in this case are a fairly typical INTJ 5w6 (584 sp/sx), who happens to be the father of the ENFJ, an anti-villain ISFP 4w3 (46x sp/so), and then an ISTJ 1w2 (164 sp/so). The focus of this story is testing the moral grey and playing with societal interactions. The secondary arc revolves their children (because after molding the story for 6 years I had difficulty separating myself from it), which stars a male ISFJ 9w1 (962 sp/so) and his friend a ISFP 7w6/9w8 (973 sx/so).

Story 2: Another fantasy story revolving around an immortal ENxP 7w8 (728 so/sp) mentoring a young INTP 5w4 (593 sp/so) female. This one is fairly new and I have yet to decide the intentions of the main villain, but he seems to be looking like an ExxJ 1, 6, or 8. Revolves around control, loss, and obligation. I'd sort of like to include my INFP 4w3 sx/sp villain here, but that doesn't seem likely.

Story 3: The last one is also fantasy and revolves mainly around an ISTJ 5w6 (513 sp/so) and an ISFP 6w7 (694 sp/so), but has important secondary characters which include an INTP 6w7 sp/so, a 2w3 so/sx ESFJ, and a 6w5 sp/sx IxTx. The main villain here is probably going to end up being an ExTP 7w6 or 1w2 so/sp (advocating insurgent type).

I have more but these are the major/developed ones and also I took up too much space already so I'll stop.
 

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Bunch of P-types all of my characters.

I noticed that all of my characters were highly independent. All of them absent minded, yet ready to engage in action in a flawless manner. All of them, of course, enslaved to a system, a dark past, or whatever restraining condition they were attempting to free themselves against, never to be successful at the end of the story. None of my characters were the main focus of the narrative, even if they were the main protagonists. They were like chess pieces for the more grandiose part of the concept to be communicated, which is always the purpose of my stories. The idea is really the main character, the actual character is an excuse. XXXP's are perfect for this.
5 ENTP's (surprised?)
2 INFP's
1 ISFP
2 ISTP's
1 INTP

All of my characters had companions that cared for them. Of course, J-types. All of them written well before I knew anything related to MBTI.

By the way, I find it much more useful to NOT use MBTI as a guide to create characters. Usually, the types come after.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Bunch of P-types all of my characters.

I noticed that all of my characters were highly independent. All of them absent minded, yet ready to engage in action in a flawless manner. All of them, of course, enslaved to a system, a dark past, or whatever restraining condition they were attempting to free themselves against, never to be successful at the end of the story. None of my characters were the main focus of the narrative, even if they were the main protagonists. They were like chess pieces for the more grandiose part of the concept to be communicated, which is always the purpose of my stories. The idea is really the main character, the actual character is an excuse. XXXP's are perfect for this.
5 ENTP's (surprised?)
2 INFP's
1 ISFP
2 ISTP's
1 INTP

All of my characters had companions that cared for them. Of course, J-types. All of them written well before I knew anything related to MBTI.

By the way, I find it much more useful to NOT use MBTI as a guide to create characters. Usually, the types come after.
Yes, I noticed that many of the dynamics I focused the most on were those that are stereotypically "good matches." In an old murder mystery, an INTJ and an ENFP. In my second story, an ENTJ and an INFP (LOVED their dynamic the most.) An ISTJ and an ESFP. I simply found interesting dynamics, namely opposing ones who argued different paths for the same cause. I also really enjoyed the dynamic I had between the ENTJ 8w7 and the INTJ 5w6. Fe/Fi dynamics are a lot of fun too.

I usually just sort of have a sense of the character I want to write, an idea of their essence and everything else falls into place. I once tried using enneagrams to come up with a bunch of variety, but the characters all grew and meshed entirely different directions than I had originally intended. A character I originally intended to be an ENFP 7w6 wound up being an ENTJ 1w2. Not much point in deciding these things ahead of time unless you intend to rely on stereotypes, which is just boring for the reader and writer.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Looking at mbti alone, I have quite a variety of characters. While it could probably be argued that I have more characters on the Fe-Ti and Ne-Si axis than the other two axis (and that the majority of the characters who aren't are ISFPs or ISTJs), I'm pretty evenly split on extroversion and introversion, intuition and sensing. I guess from a mbti standpoint, if you're looking for a degree of correlation, a lot of my female characters are T types and a lot of my male characters are F types
When it comes to enneagram type however... That when things get a bit blocky. Looking through the plot lines I have created and can remember, I'd stand to say that the vast majority of my characters are head types or gut types (excluding 8). I have a couple of heart type core characters inter dispersed, but many of them (especially the 3 cores) I ended up killing off pretty quickly, and the 4 and 2 cores I can count on my fingers (which says a lot since I have lots of characters). I think I have a grand total of 3 eights, and two of those characters are debatabley not even 8s. Instinctual varients are a bit more mixed, but still mostly sx blind (I wonder why). I suppose the lack of variety here is because I don't really focus on creating diverse characters, just ones I can deconstruct and use to play with different ideas and scenarios

With my most recent stories (which are fairly connected because they all but one occur in the same universe), the only trend I find is T female, F male, and basically all head types:

Story 1: Kind of a fantastical two arc story revolving around an female ESTP 7w8 (738 sx/so) and her love interest a male ENFJ 6w7 (629 so/sp) and then a male ENTP 7w6 (729 so/sp) and his first love interest, an ISTJ 5w6 (514 sx/sp) and a secondary love interest, an ISFP 6w7 (649 sx/so). The villains in this case are a fairly typical INTJ 5w6 (584 sp/sx), who happens to be the father of the ENFJ, an anti-villain ISFP 4w3 (46x sp/so), and then an ISTJ 1w2 (164 sp/so). The focus of this story is testing the moral grey and playing with societal interactions. The secondary arc revolves their children (because after molding the story for 6 years I had difficulty separating myself from it), which stars a male ISFJ 9w1 (962 sp/so) and his friend a ISFP 7w6/9w8 (973 sx/so).

Story 2: Another fantasy story revolving around an immortal ENxP 7w8 (728 so/sp) mentoring a young INTP 5w4 (593 sp/so) female. This one is fairly new and I have yet to decide the intentions of the main villain, but he seems to be looking like an ExxJ 1, 6, or 8. Revolves around control, loss, and obligation. I'd sort of like to include my INFP 4w3 sx/sp villain here, but that doesn't seem likely.

Story 3: The last one is also fantasy and revolves mainly around an ISTJ 5w6 (513 sp/so) and an ISFP 6w7 (694 sp/so), but has important secondary characters which include an INTP 6w7 sp/so, a 2w3 so/sx ESFJ, and a 6w5 sp/sx IxTx. The main villain here is probably going to end up being an ExTP 7w6 or 1w2 so/sp (advocating insurgent type).

I have more but these are the major/developed ones and also I took up too much space already so I'll stop.
I'd be quite interested in most of these! They quite strike my fancy, you could say. The second story in particular. lmk if you ever plan on publishing or posting any of these, I would like to read them!

I write an abundant amount of feelers and especially introverts, and that probably won't change very much any time soon. I'd rather have characters with the same types but different, well-developed personalities than a poorly written STP (I cannot write fleshed out STPs for the life of me.)

I've discovered my favorite thing to do is to make an INFP main character and villain, or an INFJ main character and villain. Mostly the former though.

It is a blast to throw in a sudden shock that makes the once black and white situation a moral gray and have the villain be able to explain their side in a manner so sound to the thought-process of the main character that everything breaks apart and they lose all bearings on their values and moral compass. I usually like the villain's argument to make the most sense to me, but just be more extreme than what I would argue.
 

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Yes, I noticed that many of the dynamics I focused the most on were those that are stereotypically "good matches." In an old murder mystery, an INTJ and an ENFP. In my second story, an ENTJ and an INFP (LOVED their dynamic the most.) An ISTJ and an ESFP. I simply found interesting dynamics, namely opposing ones who argued different paths for the same cause. I also really enjoyed the dynamic I had between the ENTJ 8w7 and the INTJ 5w6. Fe/Fi dynamics are a lot of fun too.

I usually just sort of have a sense of the character I want to write, an idea of their essence and everything else falls into place. I once tried using enneagrams to come up with a bunch of variety, but the characters all grew and meshed entirely different directions than I had originally intended. A character I originally intended to be an ENFP 7w6 wound up being an ENTJ 1w2. Not much point in deciding these things ahead of time unless you intend to rely on stereotypes, which is just boring for the reader and writer.
Absolutely! And restrictive too.
I think that's because, when you type characters, they become the center of attention for the story.
For Ne users, whether we consciously know this or not, our creative process is not really trying to bring forth a character, but an idea that the character wears.
At least, in my stories, that's what happens. A character has something profound he/she possesses and doesn't really communicate intelligibly, which has an effect on the narrative, the characters and the protagonist itself.
In my stories, the story itself is the character, so to speak, and stories can't be typed because they hold no personality, only an identity.

As for character dynamics, that's where it support the typology theory the most.
In all narratives, characters become dynamic in a way that can TOTALLY be typed and supports socionic-matching more than anything.
Even in stories like Wall-E (Eve being IXTJ and Wall-E being an EXFP), and those are robots! But since they are main characters, they are unconsciously given perception and judgement and are given corresponding matches. Why is it that Wall-E seems like the every-disney-movie Fi user enthusiast who works for the system only because he/she hasn't found its inner beauty? Why is it that Eve seems like the typical support role that serves the moral of the story, being the more focused J-type who is introduced to its innermost self by Wall-E's purity? (I hate this trend, by the way)
 

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I'd be quite interested in most of these! They quite strike my fancy, you could say. The second story in particular. lmk if you ever plan on publishing or posting any of these, I would like to read them!

I write an abundant amount of feelers and especially introverts, and that probably won't change very much any time soon. I'd rather have characters with the same types but different, well-developed personalities than a poorly written STP (I cannot write fleshed out STPs for the life of me.)

I've discovered my favorite thing to do is to make an INFP main character and villain, or an INFJ main character and villain. Mostly the former though.

It is a blast to throw in a sudden shock that makes the once black and white situation a moral gray and have the villain be able to explain their side in a manner so sound to the thought-process of the main character that everything breaks apart and they lose all bearings on their values and moral compass. I usually like the villain's argument to make the most sense to me, but just be more extreme than what I would argue.
Thank you! Your stories sound really awesome too based on what I've read about them on this thread. The third one sounds really cool, all the movies/stories you've met are among some of my favorites.

IxFP villains are so fun to make. I've heard a couple people mention how it's "super difficult" to do or how "INFPs are to soft for villains," but honestly with the right plot, an INFP can be a well formulated and unique villain. My INFP villain is one of my favorites honestly.
 

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Thank you! Your stories sound really awesome too based on what I've read about them on this thread. The third one sounds really cool, all the movies/stories you've met are among some of my favorites.

IxFP villains are so fun to make. I've heard a couple people mention how it's "super difficult" to do or how "INFPs are to soft for villains," but honestly with the right plot, an INFP can be a well formulated and unique villain. My INFP villain is one of my favorites honestly.
How does an INFP villain work? Some giant edgelord who believes their doing is for the right of the world?
 

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Weird trend I noticed with my writing is that a couple character types keep showing up:

The "Kuudere-ish" One- sometimes they're the main character, sometimes a side character. However, their outward appearance doesn't show much emotion. Sometimes I give an explanation (such as with one story were it was slowly revealed that she, the character, was trying to control all parts of her mind); other times I won't worry about it.

The One with Esoteric Knowledge: In one story, the "Kuudere-ish" one was the same character as this one. Though, this is not always the case. Simply, a character which was some sort of rare knowledge, wisdom, and/or way of seeing the world.

How does an INFP villain work? Some giant edgelord who believes their doing is for the right of the world?
I can see the well-meaning extremist trope here.
 

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How does an INFP villain work? Some giant edgelord who believes their doing is for the right of the world?
I mean, there's a couple different ways you could make an INFP villain, edgelord "advocate" being one (INFPs make fantastic anti villains in general) or maybe like "The ideal world" sort of thing. Because of Fi-Si combination you could have a character seeking vengeance because of past tragedy (kind of like how it was in the old horror movie Carrie, although I'm not sure she was actually an INFP or an ISFJ). Even a sensitive character driven by an undying loyalty to someone due to the values they hold would work (usually these are portrayed as ISTJs in traditional villainy. The trick is to make the Fi super apparent/Ne present). My INFP villain is more on the obsessive side (Fi+sx) and focuses more on her inner/false interpretations of the world and the colorful associations she makes between the sounds she perceives and the people she encounters (I thought it would be cool to have a villain with audio synthesia).

I'd love to hear someone else describe their INFP villains. I only have one as of now, so I might not be doing a fantastic job explaining.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
@Rydori @Krayfish
Well for stereotypical INFP villains, you have the disturbed artist, like Erik (AKA the Phantom) from Phantom at the Opera (depending on the portrayal. Some play him as INxJ, and the book has a very convoluted typing,) or the wounded soul, like Sweeney Todd. Quite sympathetic, to most, but not my ideal villain.

As for the type of INFP villain I prefer, I think 9w1 INFPs are a blast. Wilson Fisk from Daredevil is a great example. He truly wants to make the world a better place and sees the world around him as rife with potential. The show argues how unlike the hero, he is a troubled romantic at his core who is disgusted by the things he "must do to improve the world." He hates murder and blood and is deeply caring but believes the only way to fix his city is through the underworld.

I'd look at Monster, the anime, for my favorite INFP villain of all time. He uses the characteristic ability of INFPs to grow close with people and analyze their psyche against them. Spoilers are spoilered below if you aren't going to see it.

 
johan.jpg The villain is an angelic looking INFP who is a mass murderer. Some argue he's an INFJ (as did I, at the beginning of the show), I think he's a wildly corrupt INFP 9w1 sx/sp. He finds those he can tell are deeply troubled and worms his way into their head, charming, connecting with them and understanding them. One of the characters, a killer who was abused as a child and kills for sexual pleasure, is written to by Johan and feels as if Johan is the only one who understands him. Johan gets him to detail the abuse he had as a child and convinces him to work through it by murdering someone in a similar manner to the abuse he faced. Another group was a white supremacy group (the story takes place in germany, by the way) who were convinced he was the next Hitler and wanted to please him by murdering who he pleased and retrieving the only two people Johan cares about, his twin sister and the main character, a neurosurgeon who saved his life. He talks an alcoholic detective into suicide by accusing him of intentionally killing a teenager who he shot while supposedly drunk.

He is, however, very kind towards individuals, especially children. Johan is doesn't do very much killing on his own, rather he manipulates others into doing it for him, mostly people he's never directly met. As a child, he manipulated those around him in the orphanage to start attacking one another and simply watched as the other children killed one another. Where I am in the show, his motives are uncertain, but they appear to be very complex. It is clear to me so far that he doesn't think he's doing right for the world, he is simply following his own moral compass and making an ideal society.
 

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Yes, I noticed that many of the dynamics I focused the most on were those that are stereotypically "good matches." In an old murder mystery, an INTJ and an ENFP. In my second story, an ENTJ and an INFP (LOVED their dynamic the most.) An ISTJ and an ESFP. I simply found interesting dynamics, namely opposing ones who argued different paths for the same cause.
What was that ISTJ/ESFP dynamics like? Idk if I find ESFPs particularly good dynamics, they are okay, nothing great, nothing terrible - just curious tho' about what you were thinking of here.
 

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Story 1: protagonist: female INFP, male ENFJ, male ISTP. Antagonist: male ENTP and ESTJ. Couple: Male ENFJ and female INFP

Story 2: protagonist: female ENFJ, female ENFP, female INFP, male ENTJ, male ESFP, male ENTP. Antagonist: male ESTJ (too many little antagonists to recall). The male ENTJ has to fight for the ENFJ female, and I mean really fight.

Story 3: protagonist: female ESTP, male ISTJ, male ENFP, male INTP. Antagonist: female ESFJ. Female ESTP falls in love initially with male ENFP, but he broke up and then she got closer to her business partner male INTP.

Story 4: protagonist: female ENFJ, male ENTJ, male ESFP, male ENTP. Antagonist: male INTJ, male ESTJ, female INFP. ENFJ falls in love with ESFP initially, but later she and ENTJ loved each other. Male INTJ tried to kill ENTJ, while male ESTJ abs female INFP tried to kill the ENFJ.
 

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I like writing characters with wild personalities, Ne-doms and Se-doms seem to be the best for this. Other than that, I write a bunch of introverts of varying types.
 

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The main characters of my works are almost all introverts. That aside, Ne-doms are somewhat interesting to write.
 
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