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Discussion Starter #1
My coworker has an MS in Counseling and her specialization used to be autism spectrum disorders.

She's been casually mentioning Asperger's to me lately, and today she asked me if I've ever been tested.

She's not the first person to ask me that.

So, naturally I have been reading everything I can find on Asperger's - specific to females.

And...I can relate to almost everything I've read, but...I'm not sure how accurate all of it is. I've been talking to a good friend who is a psych nurse, and he also believes it is possible that I have Asperger's. It would explain a lot.

Anyway, I'm wondering if any of the females here have been diagnosed with Asperger's (or just think you have it).

And...thoughts on these articles?

Aspienwomen: Adult Women with Asperger Syndrome. Moving towards a female profile of Asperger Syndrome | taniaannmarshall

The Aspie Life: Adults/Women With Asperger's - The Good and Bad

help4aspergers.com - List of Female Asperger traits

I think I function okay, but I know I could do better (esp with regards to relationships and some work-related issues).
 

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Well you are an NT, there is some intersection there, your friends could be wrong, do they know of MBTI. I've gotten the sperg comment as well. I've only met one female zerg, she seemed normal, but, she did not fit her gender well in that there was no femininity in her and had zero patience for her sex, was generally in the nerdy hobbies, physically and socially awkward, and above average intelligence. I never met you so i cant really compare her to you.


:: Asperger Women's Association ::
Also this ^
 
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I didn't know the symptoms were different for females. I had almost ruled it out for myself because I hate routine/order and don't memorize bus schedules, but now I have to reconsider. Most of those really do fit me.
 
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I didn't know the symptoms were different for females. I had almost ruled it out for myself because I hate routine/order and don't memorize bus schedules, but now I have to reconsider. Most of those really do fit me.
I searched for articles specific to females because I just knew there had to be differences.

Did you read about female children with Asperger's? If so, can you relate?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well you are an NT, there is some intersection there, your friends could be wrong, do they know of MBTI. I've gotten the sperg comment as well. I've only met one female zerg, she seemed normal, but, she did not fit her gender well in that there was no femininity in her and had zero patience for her sex, was generally in the nerdy hobbies, physically and socially awkward, and above average intelligence. I never met you so i cant really compare her to you.


:: Asperger Women's Association ::
Also this ^
My psych nurse friend does know about MBTI -and he's also an ENTP - and schizoid).

The co-worker knows a bit, but hasn't really studied MBTI.

I have a friend who did some testing on me a few years ago and he said I have "boy brain"...which may be why I've never had many female friends and can't relate to most women. Nerdy hobbies - yes. Awkward - yes, but I've worked hard on that and I do okay now (I'm also 43). Above average intelligence? IQ has been tested, and yes.
 

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I searched for articles specific to females because I just knew there had to be differences.

Did you read about female children with Asperger's? If so, can you relate?
Yes, and yes. Thank you for posting about this. It wouldn't have ever occurred to me that they would exclude the symptoms of girls/women from the vast majority of online information. I just assumed the symptoms would not be gender-dependent, and that if they were, that would be noted.
 

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At University I did once meet a rarer 33 year old autistic woman - such an interesting personality: very intelligent, warm but reserved, with parental input decided it was best to wait until after High School to get officially diagnosed, attempted engineering in her 20's then educational psychology at 32, knew she wanted children in her early 20's, studied part time as a part time teachers aide (teaching assistant in a primary school), the type to need to study more to learn a subject, emotionally aware but not overly empathetic, very knowledgeable, a bad time keeper with imperfect organisation skills, dressed in gender neutral attire and very self aware as a thinker type.
 

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I just realised that I have AS, which in ways have proved that I am not an INTJ after all (because INTJs' characteristics have a lot of similarities that may be mistaken for AS). One of the symptoms that gave it away was my over-sensitivity to external stimulus, social awkwardness and lack of emotional expression, even though I am still very much an emotionally-driven person.
 

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I just realised that I have AS, which in ways have proved that I am not an INTJ after all (because INTJs' characteristics have a lot of similarities that may be mistaken for AS). One of the symptoms that gave it away was my over-sensitivity to external stimulus, social awkwardness and lack of emotional expression, even though I am still very much an emotionally-driven person.
In truth, so many [insert disorder or mental issue] traits are common enough that everything is a little bit 'non typical', yet so much of the media and society as a whole is centred towards 'the norm', perfection and moulded personalities built upon generalisability versus pre 1970's thinking of more noble character being valued most.

Even I as a medically verified autistic relate to many of the female ASD traits 'less present' as a stronger feeling sensitive guy.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I just realised that I have AS, which in ways have proved that I am not an INTJ after all (because INTJs' characteristics have a lot of similarities that may be mistaken for AS). One of the symptoms that gave it away was my over-sensitivity to external stimulus, social awkwardness and lack of emotional expression, even though I am still very much an emotionally-driven person.
I originally tested as INTJ too, and then INTP for a long time. Someone else tested me and came up with ENTP, which I do still think is accurate. That might sound odd, but I've worked very hard at studying body language and communication styles (and psychology overall) because I've always felt awkward around people.

So much makes sense now.
 

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I originally tested as INTJ too, and then INTP for a long time. Someone else tested me and came up with ENTP, which I do still think is accurate. That might sound odd, but I've worked very hard at studying body language and communication styles (and psychology overall) because I've always felt awkward around people.

So much makes sense now.
I tested as INFP, ENTP, INTP and INTJ while I was emotionally unhealthy. I knew immediately that the first 3 types aren't me, and I had the misconception of being an INTJ. Right now, it seems like ENFP's description describes me more accurately even though I never get this score from any MBTI tests I've taken before.

Yes, I have also been observing and learning about nonverbal communication, but I'm still struggling with the application of the knowledge (as always). Indeed, it does. I was devastated at first, as it explains why I've been a failure in life for many mainstream pursuits, but after changing my perspective and lowering my expectations, I have a clearer picture of who I actually am, and I stopped following how people lead their lives to live the life that I want to.
 

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In truth, so many [insert disorder or mental issue] traits are common enough that everything is a little bit 'non typical', yet so much of the media and society as a whole is centred towards 'the norm', perfection and moulded personalities built upon generalisability versus pre 1970's thinking of more noble character being valued most.

Even I as a medically verified autistic relate to many of the female ASD traits 'less present' as a stronger feeling sensitive guy.
These days, society look for aesthetics over quality and nobility. People just want to see and hear what they like to, not necessarily what's good for them.

If I am not medically-certificated, does it mean that there's still a chance that I may not be an aspie after all?
 

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If I am not medically-certificated, does it mean that there's still a chance that I may not be an aspie after all?
As callous as it might sound, autism has become a 'trendy disorder' until people actually have to live it; until then social awkwardness, vulnerability to coercion, idiosyncrasies, oddness, uniqueness and focussed interests are attributed to 'being autistic traits alone' rather than what many would attribute to teenage-adult desires for a sense of self identity to call their own*.

The choice is yours if you wish to see a psychiatrist, trained autism diagnostician service or an educational psychologist... do you feel the unconfirmed definition will influence your sense of self by not knowing the true answer?

*In the last few years I have come to accept that ASD stigmas or labels are just that; poor public PR that fails to acknowledge the positives of people as a whole or better yet life adjustments made towards living ones interpretation of a productive life.
 

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This is funny. I'm staying with my sister temporarily (just moved back to my hometown), and I read a lot of the traits to her and she said, "Oh yeah - you are definitely an Aspie." She said it explains a lot...

Ah, well. Not worried about it, but may seek help with certain aspects of my life. Interesting.
 

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I am a gal diagnosed with Asperger's since I was a child.
I do not relate to the description of the "feminine" AS, though.
My AS is pretty much like the "classical" one, also called the "male" AS form.
I cannot copy others or modify my behaviour.
This is probably why I was diagnosed so early.

I think that AS is the reason why the myers-briggs test doesn't work for me.
Of course people with AS are more likely to score as introverts on the myers-briggs tests, no matter what their true personality really is.
I usually score INTP, ISTP, INFP, ISFP and ISTJ, and I have scored pretty much everything on the introverted scale.
The myers-briggs can't be 100% accurate for someone with Asperger's IMO, as it influences the way a person's brain is wired.
 

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As callous as it might sound, autism has become a 'trendy disorder' until people actually have to live it; until then social awkwardness, vulnerability to coercion, idiosyncrasies, oddness, uniqueness and focussed interests are attributed to 'being autistic traits alone' rather than what many would attribute to teenage-adult desires for a sense of self identity to call their own*.

The choice is yours if you wish to see a psychiatrist, trained autism diagnostician service or an educational psychologist... do you feel the unconfirmed definition will influence your sense of self by not knowing the true answer?

*In the last few years I have come to accept that ASD stigmas or labels are just that; poor public PR that fails to acknowledge the positives of people as a whole or better yet life adjustments made towards living ones interpretation of a productive life.
Yes, to an extent, it does and I want to know the true answer, and at the same time, I'm afraid to know the truth. If I were to be diagnosed with AS, I'll probably state that in my job applications, in order to seek understanding for certain social issues. I am afraid that this may cause employers to discriminate against me, especially since most organisations require one to not hide anything from them. I'm also afraid of being socially and romantically discriminated as well. I find that a lot of people try to change me to be 'normal' or 'better', which is extremely stressful to me.

Well, my definition of a productive life is different from what 90% of people would define it as, so it kind of sets me apart from others, in both positive and negative ways.
 
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