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I'm curious: how diverse is our INTJ population in age on here? Also: do you believe age defines (or at least provides an adequate insight into) subjective intellectuality?

For the record, I'm seventeen.
 

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I'm 43, the older I get the more useless I realise intellectualism is. In my younger years I was brash and intellectual and utterly stupid in the ways of the world. Intellectualism is an interesting hobby, a nice little pursuit for your days off or something to pursue career wise. It's isn't a great platform for getting things done in the world nor for finding synergy with other people. At the end of the day your ability to get others to buy into your ideas will determine your success far more than your intelligence or intellectual understanding of a subject will. Most intellectuals end up with tenure in educational institutions proving the age old adage that those that can't do, teach.
 

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There's IQ and there's EQ. Average IQ + persistence and patience can get you somewhere in obtaining education.

However, to find support, benefactors, and solid relationships, EQ is the key.

I just read about William Shockley, a Nobel Prize winner and the founder of Silicon Valley. He sounded like an INTJ to me. However he's a failure in work place and personal relationship (his children found out his death from the newspaper).
 

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Do you believe age defines (or at least provides an adequate insight into) subjective intellectuality
As of now, I'm 25 years of age.

I am not sure what you mean by "subjective intellectuality" as opposed to "objective intellectuality," but I think you can safely say that age is significantly correlated to intellectuality in general. Like all processes, knowledge, understanding, and various perspectives require time to mature; it does takes time to take in, chew, and thoroughly digest things to formulate your own perspective. (Some people process things much faster than others, which is why you observe much variance in the relationship between age and intellectuality; however, it is difficult to deny the fact that the two are heavily correlated.)
 

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I just read about William Shockley, a Nobel Prize winner and the founder of Silicon Valley. He sounded like an INTJ to me. However he's a failure in work place and personal relationship (his children found out his death from the newspaper).
And people like that become kind of cult hero's for INTJs instead of the cautionary tales they are. I think many of us would secretly like to succeed in spite of ourselves rather than by developing in the necessary area's. It's not enough to be brilliant in the head, one must also have some practical way of getting those idea's off the ground. And that obstacle is often the limiting factor for many introverts with good ideas.

I've had several business idea's over the years and without fail I've watched someone else take every single one of them and make them a reality. Am I jealous? Not really. One has to be aware of the 100 monkey affect. If you have a good idea, leave it long enough somewhere in the world someone more capable than you will have the same idea and run with it. It's almost like once an idea exists in the ethers (by the mere fact of someone thinking it) the copyright is gone and it's up for grabs. The ability to generate idea's alone isn't all that great.
 

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I'm 27, I think intelligence is something that can be cultivated or left to deteriorate over time. I'd rather be intelligent and have no money or friends than stupid to the point of constant boredom and ungratefulness with everything the world has to offer.
 

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The ability to generate idea's alone isn't all that great.
Completely agree; I give about 1% for the idea itself and 99% to the actual implementation. I'm experiencing this firsthand now that I've started a company. Actual product itself along with good marketing triumphs over the novelty of the initial idea by a great margin. There are probably a thousand people who had thought of the same idea, yet only a few are courageous enough to attempt it, and even fewer have the right resources and grit to actualize it.

Anyhow, in line with the topic of the original post, I remember a case-study where an infant boy was raised by scientists to see how much they could affect his IQ (highly accelerated intellectual training from birth). Ethical soundness aside, if I remember correctly they were able to achieve an IQ of 220. In that particular case, the age-factor was significantly superseded by the special upbringing.
 

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I'm 17 years old, and I do think intellectualism can get you somewhere. Where I live, the school system is so different from yours. At the age of eleven, everyone is separated into five levels, purely based on intellectual capacity and intelligence. Only the people who go to the highest of those levels, can attend the highest level of college, and therefore get a master's of PhD.
 

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24.

Not sure I fully understand the question being asked. I think the older someone is, the more time they have on average to have explored a craft or topic thoroughly with lots of personal experience to back it up.

As for the value of intellectual pursuits, certainly somebody is going to do it, so that we have people to educate the next generation and push the boundaries of conventional thought. But in terms of practicality, it doesn't pay the bills. Rarely do intellectual pursuits allow for any money to be made at all.

Teaching is probably the only guaranteed method of making a living off of intellectual pursuits.

Then again, the arts aren't good at paying the bills either and look at how many people do it anyway. Some people are gonna go the practical route, others are gonna live more on the edge. Tis the nature of humanity.
 

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18 as of last week here, actually pretty surprised there are 2 other 17 year olds in here.

Anyways, not quite sure what you're asking about subjective intellectuality, but as several other people on here have said, just being smart isn't everything. I'm learning more and more than you have to be smart, about how you are smart. It cant be a great help in school, an when trying to accomplish a problem, but if you're stupid about being smart, you come off as cocky, arrogant, you make mistakes, people dislike you, etc. I've always been pretty decent at it, but it's something you can always work on.
 

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Not really an answer, but it kind of is: You should read This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald.
(I'm 20, btw)
 

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Being intelligent is not the same as being an intellectual. The term "intellectual" is pretty vague. The way most people use it, it means someone who knows a lot about a variety of academic subjects, but doesn't include hard sciences, technology, math, or engineering.

Most people would call me an intellectual. I come from a family heavily loaded with university professors, and I can keep up with them in conversation and knowledge. I have broad general knowledge of history, literature, religion, and the arts, and enjoy learning more about those topics.

But I value being intelligent much more. I value someone who is asking questions, thinking critically, challenging assumptions, learning new things, It doesn't matter much to me what the topic is. A person could be a great mechanic or a really insightful cook. I value that as much as a great historian or philosopher.

When I was young, I thought academic subjects counted more, because that's what our society says. I don't believe that anymore.

I'm 51.
 

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Intellect takes time to develop. Id say people reach their baseline inherent intelligence at around 16-18. From there they have the capability to go deeper into more complicated subjects and gain wisdom or become "intellectuals". I dont like that word, it sounds like praising your own intellect and trying to create distinction between you and those "lower" than you.
 

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An interesting valuation question.
I have found that carrots run rings around me when it comes to being a carrot.
And FYI, I have experienced 17.
 

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I am younger than some here and I value intellectualism not only because it is an avenue to accrue knowledge and practice critical thinking but because I love research.

I believe some academic topics are more practical than others but then again I view every conversation as a learning experience — what seems like a useless discussion at one point can be a valuable past experience at another time. It's rather close-minded to assume that something lacks value and use when you not only haven't walked that path to the end but when you aren't privy to the research being undertaken and where its impacts are made.

There is a critical error being made in this thread than intellectualism implies poor sociability. People can be intellectuals and still have charisma, social skills, zest and a supportive social circle. It sounds like the actual problem here is about arrogant recluses who do not entirely represent academics. The other side to the problem is people who succeed in other ways but judge intellectualism as a pursuit that is not the right way to succeed. There are many roads to success especially considering success, happiness and especially value are subjective.
 
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