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Do you think of yourself as a good person?

  • Yes - I'm a feeler.

    Votes: 7 20.6%
  • Yes - I'm a thinker.

    Votes: 9 26.5%
  • Yes - I don't know my type.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Ambivalent - I'm a thinker.

    Votes: 11 32.4%
  • Ambivalent - I'm a feeler.

    Votes: 3 8.8%
  • Ambivalent - I don't know my type.

    Votes: 1 2.9%
  • No - I'm a feeler.

    Votes: 1 2.9%
  • No - I'm a thinker.

    Votes: 1 2.9%
  • No - I don't know my type.

    Votes: 1 2.9%

  • Total voters
    34
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Discussion Starter #1
So I'd like to clarify the point of this thread before someone becomes outraged. I'm not of the opinion that being an F or a T makes you a better or worse person. My only interest is whether there's any difference in how people on different sides of the dynamic see themselves.

In my personal experience, Ts are much less likely to think of themselves as good people, even when they are. Fs, being morally driven, are more likely to think they're doing a good job of being a good person, whether or not they are. We all know a few 'Good Christians' who aren't good at all, and a few 'I'm a bad girl/boy' types who are really much sweeter than they'll admit. That's what I'd like to test here.

So, without further ado - do you think of yourself as a good person, and are you an F or a T? Do you think anyone can really know whether or not they're 'good'?
 
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l shall exclude the type of the worst (IMHO) person l've ever known and just say that it's consistent with your hypothesis, including their self-view.

l voted ambivalent, l've never seen myself as a bad person.

l can see an F type making an equally incorrect self-judgment in the other direction, to be fair. More consideration with the subject in general from my experience.

My basis for judging good/bad in other people is also questionable(l realize this).
 

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My hypothesis is that thinking types are more likely to be ambivalent, and feelers are more likely to think either they are a good or a bad person.
 
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I would also like to point out that a person's view of themself is not static, but more likely dynamic.

Especially for a feeler, maybe?

Like today I think I am a good person, but maybe a few days ago when I did something wrong I decided it was because there was something fundamentally wrong with me which makes me a bad person.
 

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I'd ask the person what they meant by good and bad, because I don't believe everyone it talking about the same things when they use those words, even if they believe themselves to be.

As for me, I don't know if I am a good or bad person. If I try to do good, but know not if it actually is good, nor any arguments in opposition to it supports good. At least not with some sort of absolute certainty. Like everything in life, it is prone to uncertainty when evaluated with reason and honesty.

TJ.
 

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Am I good, in terms of perfection, since "good" can't be used as "quantity"? No.

Do I strive to be good? Yes.
 

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I am liable to be very good or very bad depending on circumstances. Luckily my sense of guilt, laziness, and unwillingness to take risks keeps me from doing terrible things I want to do.
 

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I have good intentions... sometimes I do bad things before running it by my intentions for review, but that's a different story.
 

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I'm ambivalent. Likeable & charming, but hardly a candidate for beatification.
(Although given some of the saints...!)

I haven't killed anyone; raped; pillaged; murdered; robbed any banks; or burnt down any buildings ("O, for a mews on fire!" as the arsonist said in the stables). That doesn't mean that I wouldn't, if I thought it were justified.

How do you define "good"? By what standards do you say that someone is "good" or "bad" (your own, society's, the legal code, in terms of the consequences, in terms of their intentions or motivations)? Would you say that someone is good if they refrain from romping around town with a chainsaw, or are "goodness" and "badness" positive qualities? Or what if I think that indulgence is the only virtue, and that evil lies in denying impulses? Or that whatever makes me happy is good: the suffering of others is a good thing, so the more misery I inflict on others, the happier I am? Evil be thou my good, and all that.

The world doesn't have "good" or "bad" people - it has actions that are positive or negative, depending on the situation and the outcome. People are too complex to be good or bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm ambivalent. Likeable & charming, but hardly a candidate for beatification.
(Although given some of the saints...!)

I haven't killed anyone; raped; pillaged; murdered; robbed any banks; or burnt down any buildings ("O, for a mews on fire!" as the arsonist said in the stables). That doesn't mean that I wouldn't, if I thought it were justified.

How do you define "good"? By what standards do you say that someone is "good" or "bad" (your own, society's, the legal code, in terms of the consequences, in terms of their intentions or motivations)? Would you say that someone is good if they refrain from romping around town with a chainsaw, or are "goodness" and "badness" positive qualities?

The world doesn't have "good" or "bad" people - it has actions that are good or bad, depending on the situation and the outcome. People are too complex to be good or bad. So the hardened criminal is capable of altruism or love, just as the devoutly religious are capable of fanaticism and bigotry.
My personal, irrelevant beliefs are along these lines: everyone has good and bad in them, some have a little more of one or the other. Stupid people have bright moments, good people have bad moments. The main difference between a good person and a bad person, to me, is that a good person tries. As an atheist, I don't consider signing up for a religion to be trying - that's too easy. You have to be conscious of yourself, of the people around you, of society, and observe the way your actions or inaction are harming or helping others.

I have a knee-jerk reaction when people say they don't believe in good and bad people because my early life was greatly influenced by bad people whom I knew on a very personal level, as well as if not better than they knew themselves. I don't know you and I don't know what kind of life you've lead, but I often think that people who hold your belief must have been very lucky to have somehow avoided the worst kinds of people humanity has to offer.

I don't think of good and bad in terms of storybook evil. Not being a rapist is good, but not really much of a claim to fame. I can't imagine attending the funeral of someone I love and having little more to say about their kindness and quality of character than 'S/he wasn't a rapist or a serial killer.' Taking advantage of someone who cares about you is also a bad thing, so is saying something mean about a friend behind their back. I've done both of these things and felt guilty, but I try not to.

Everyone has different definitions of good, and I think that's an important thing to recognise. To my sister, being good is not telling her friend that her dress makes her look fat; to me, the opposite is true. But I think it's good to at least talk about these things, applying both reason and empathy to every situation.
 
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The world doesn't have "good" or "bad" people - it has actions that are positive or negative, depending on the situation and the outcome. People are too complex to be good or bad.
I agree with this.

Also most people probably think their intentions are good or at least their bad choices are justified. The result of this poll supports this. Even people who have done extreme evil might see their intentions as 'good' from their warped perception.
 

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I agree with this.

Also most people probably think their intentions are good or at least their bad choices are justified. The result of this poll supports this. Even people who have done extreme evil might see their intentions as 'good' from their warped perception.
Well, what an intelligent impartial observer - someone who can see the big picture - would consider justified. Not the person themselves: most people aren't the best judges of their actions (too subjective / myopic).
 

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the "f's" i know can adopt it as a sense of self--or they have a complex that drives this and so identify as an "f".

the "t's" i know will most likely see it as a non-issue--meaning that it's either not something that they contemplate, or that they just don't see a point in discussing something so personal with another. (insert "complexes" as well; disentangling the jungian perspectives from mental-molds is something that takes a great deal of self-knowledge).
 

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I have good intentions, I may not make the best choices though. I would have to say I am ambivalent though.
 

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Being a good person requires conscious effort, in that a person makes a choice to do what they believe is right and steer away from doing what is wrong. Personally, I'm glad that people are selecting yes because being a good person is probably important to them and they care to make an effort.
 

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Good and evil are in the eye of the beholder.

Torquemada thought that he was doing the right thing.
 

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I don't really know what makes someone a good person or a bad person. I used to think it was intention that mattered, but then you have to consider things like mental illness or circumstances that might skew someone's judgment. Someone acting from a place of terrible distress may behave recklessly, or even lash out, but they are disoriented. And if they really understood the full impact of their actions, would they still behave that way? Some yes, some no. So there are a lot of layers, and at what point is it just a matter of accountability? And what about people with antisocial personality disorder (what we call a "sociopath"), for which there is supposedly a large genetic component? Is it fair to hold up the same moral standards for someone whose brain physiology is pretty much incapable of allowing them to feel empathy or experience a conscience?

I think I generally have good intentions. I don't really wound anyone on purpose, and in fact my motivation in life is to help reduce needless suffering, as much as possible. Yet I don't actively do all that much to help the world. In fact, I isolate myself, am avoidant, tell white lies, make some selfish decisions, and do whatever I need to do to just make it through the day (especially when I'm in a serious depressive episode). I will not do something that seriously conflicts with my values, but what excuse do I have for the smaller things I let slide? Truth is, I am insecure. And I am self-preserving above all else. Sometimes I even question my intentions, like whether or not I want to help others for the "right" reasons". Though I know the empathy I feel when others suffer... and the love I feel for humans and other living things, is genuine. Sometimes even raw.

So I don't know. I don't go out of my way to hurt people, but my actions have caused harm (as is the case for anyone)... and I don't think I've done all that much to make up for it, either. Sometimes I sincerely believe that people would be better off without me. But then I am told otherwise by loved ones, that I bring value and joy to the lives of others, beyond what I can supposedly see, and I would devastate people if I were to, say, fall off the face of the earth. I can't always see that, but I can only trust they believe this. I just don't know who has the warped perspective here, my loved ones who say this, or myself.

Therefore: Feeler, and ambivalent. Final answer.
 

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While I always act on good intentions, I still have to consider and wonder whether they're perceived as good :) My husband, and ENFP, has a heart of gold, always helping people who are upset. To me that's a good guy! I suppose it all depends on what you mean by good person though, thanks for asking this!
 
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