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Functions Mimicking Other Functions​

I find this topic very interesting, however, though I've seen scattered comments concerning this topic here and there in separate posts on different forums, I have yet to see a specific area in which this topic is actually discussed in detail.

Example:
Looking at the functions we can tell that the difference between the functions are Ti|Te & Fe|Fi. Combining Se and Ti can create a fake version of Te. Se notices all the details while Ti organizes in the head. By having Se take the dominate position it forces Ti to organize outside the head and creates a simulated version of Te.


For Introverted Feelings you combine Ti with Fe and add a touch of Ne. The Ti is dominate so that forces Fe to keep all emotions inside. Fe will instinctively look at the emotions and know what another person is feeling. The trick here is that the fake Fi will do the same thing but instead of knowing its not their emotions it will force Fe users to see things as if they were. Ne is used to help find a little more possibility, and Ti is also there to force your thoughts onto the feelings and make you “think” they’re your feelings. A fictitious Fi
Source: William.Nighthawk — Functional Combinations


Unfortunately, I am not sure how to develop and add onto this, so I would like more input from the rest of you- preferably a set guide with all different types of combination and scenarios.


Format for guide if you wish to contribute:

1. function used most (bold this) + the next function used most = appeared function

in order words: ___>___>___ = ____

if you think there are more than one helper functions, add them in.


2. Explanation.

3. Example set in real-time.


Example:

1. Ne + Ti + Si = Fe

2. Si identifies present scenario as one that has happened before. Ne immediately draws out possible scenarios and solutions. Ti is able to then select the best possible action for a certain situation. And so, the outcome may look like Fe.

3. Many people come to me with problems because I try to look for the best possible way to maintain harmony while solving the issue. They think it's because I'm kind and considerate. What's really going on is, I'm giving them solutions from my experience since I've failed several times in the past and wish to avoid more issues. Basically, nearly all of my kindness comes from my failures- it's not because I care about others, but rather because I know what works and what doesn't work.



...If that sounded completely wrong, please correct me at once.


Why create this guide?

This guide would be extremely useful to spotting false behavior and false types as well as a guide to create an almost non-existing function based off of functions which one already has. Preferably, this guide will have different combination sets for each individual function.
 

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This really sounds interesting....
First of all, I would like to congratulate you for mastering such skill that does not naturally come with your MBTI type.

However, in my opinion.. what you're referring to in your post, by definition, is closer to 'wisdom' than to Fe.

Wisdom is a deep understanding and realizing of people, things, events or situations, resulting in the ability to choose or act to consistently produce the optimum results with
a minimum of time and energy

Wisdom itself can be acquired from intuition or accumulated experience. Fe, on other hand, is strongly guided by the desire to meet the needs of others.
In short, no matter what type we belong to, wisdom is something that everybody can achieve. :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This really sounds interesting....
First of all, I would like to congratulate you for mastering such skill that does not naturally come with your MBTI type.

However, in my opinion.. what you're referring to in your post, by definition, is closer to 'wisdom' than to Fe.

Wisdom is a deep understanding and realizing of people, things, events or situations, resulting in the ability to choose or act to consistently produce the optimum results with
a minimum of time and energy

Wisdom itself can be acquired from intuition or accumulated experience. Fe, on other hand, is strongly guided by the desire to meet the needs of others.
In short, no matter what type we belong to, wisdom is something that everybody can achieve. :laughing:
ENTPs actually do have Fe in their cognitive functions order: Ne > Ti > Fe > Si...though, in my own personal cognitive preferences order, Fe is third to last. :p

But yeah, that's pretty interesting (I also really like your definition of wisdom)- thanks for your input!
 

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ENTPs actually do have Fe in their cognitive functions order: Ne > Ti > Fe > Si...though, in my own personal cognitive preferences order, Fe is third to last. :p

But yeah, that's pretty interesting (I also really like your definition of wisdom)- thanks for your input!
Which means that you have a decent use of the Fe function, with only four other types having it better: EFJs and IFJs. So your Fe is prevalent as well is mine, but at a lower order.

Based on another of Linda Berens and Dario Nardi's booklets, "An Introduction to the Personality Code", they describe ETPs using Fe this way:

"They can enjoy connecting with others, easily making social connections to get things done. They make people feel comfortable, giving them praise, and they feel the needs of other people and may take those on as their own. They may even feel pulled to be responsible for and take care of others and jump to their rescue if they think other people have been mistreated or are in danger of some kind. They often ask about and share desire the respect of others. They diplomatic attempts may be misinterpreted as they respond to interpersonal politics. Mostly, others view them as friendly, enthusiastic, and interesting.

When younger they tend to lack empathy and as they grow, they recognize and deal with the feelings of the people around them, such as getting control of their emotional reactions when others have slighted them. They can be more affected by others opinions of them that they want to be. Over time, they learn to be more accommodating of others and say yes without searching so hard for some underlying strategy another person surely has.

Engaging in Fe can be unsettling and disruptive. Even with experience, they may have difficulty expressing their caring - often they think they have communicated their feelings only to discover later others did not hear it. And they may unsettle others with their easy connection and read what is going with another person or people in the group."


So what you may be understanding as some sort of combine function could be how ETPs use the Fe function. Notwithstanding as I alluded to in your other thread on this topic, Berens' other booklet, "Understanding and Applying Jung's Cognitive Processes", "Fe and Ne can be considered look-alike functions. Dr. Berens says, "Ne and Fe often focus on people and their interactions. With Ne, it is the meanings and inferences that come to mind relative to people and their interactions. With Fe, it is the actions that keep people connected or disconnected that matter." So there is no combo to Ne that makes it look like Fe. You either are observing your use of the function at the tertiary level or the resemblance of the two functions.

Hope that helps.
 

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This is an interesting idea.

I'd also like to point out that quite frequently, one can behave in a way that makes him appear to be using a certain function, when in actuality he is motivated by other functions.

This is one of the most common reasons for people erroneously believing they're constantly using shadow functions all the time. I often hear things like, "Yeah he's an INFP but he has strong Ti" because they've seen that person make impersonal decisions/remove personal feelings when necessary.

This doesn't constitute Ti use. It focuses too much on what the person did and too little on why he did it. You have to keep digging past the surface behavior and look for the ultimate motivation--what part of this person's most fundamental values motivated him to behave this way? In order for him to be using Ti, he would have to temporarily set aside his regular Fi and Te and make a logical/impersonal decision based purely on an internal, subjective standard, which clashes heavily with his natural perspective.

For instance, let us consider an INFP judge. He may be morally opposed to causing pain, but at the same time he understands that he has to set aside personal feelings in order for the justice system, which he believes is morally right, to work the way it's supposed to. Now, I would interpret this primarily as Te (he sees that an objective system of rules is necessary in order for society to function as a whole unit), but I've seen people misinterpret this as Ti because it involves making an impersonal decision.

The point is that, even if the behavior is something Ti users commonly do, it's not actual Ti use if it just services a more important Fi/Te end (to promote moral behavior by enforcing an objective set of rules.) This is a great example of Fi "imitating" Ti, but it's important to remember that when assessing functions we're looking for the underlying reasoning, not the behavior itself.

In short: If you're not using a function because you understand and appreciate the value in that function's perspective purely for its own sake (rather than because behaving that way serves the ends of a different function's agenda), you're not really using that function at all.
 

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I guess you could call the pseudo-function a "puppet function" then, since what's driving it is still the primary function -- the "man behind the curtain" is still pulling the strings.
 

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I'm confused why my post was deleted; My article on Pseudo-Functions was well thought out; Just like all my articles on theories that I thought were my own. I didn't know others had come up with them before me. (AKA Bastards who won't let me have my limelight.)

I know I didn't post the article but I thought it was good that I came in and told them that I wrote it, that way if they had any questions about points made they could ask me instead of being redirected to someone else.

Check the blog post for proper spacing and pictures :D [William.Nighthawk]
 

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I'm confused why my post was deleted; My article on Pseudo-Functions was well thought out; Just like all my articles on theories that I thought were my own. I didn't know others had come up with them before me. (AKA Bastards who won't let me have my limelight.)

I know I didn't post the article but I thought it was good that I came in and told them that I wrote it, that way if they had any questions about points made they could ask me instead of being redirected to someone else.

Check the blog post for proper spacing and pictures :D [William.Nighthawk]
Repost it- I didn't see it.
 

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No, you posted it. I'm William Nighthawk. You might also enjoy my comic book article on the writer of Kick Ass.
 
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