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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hind sight is always 20/20.

I'm talking about how she encountered police but they dismissed her behavior and the whole situation as someone who was in a mental health moment because she spoke the words OCD and/or anxiety. There are two sides of the story here, she wanted to get into the van because she was worried about being left behind, and clearly the police knew to separate them...But under any other circumstance, they would have arrested her on DV charges for being the aggressor. This would have sent her into the system where she would have had to call her parents for help, and they (her and him) would not have been able to see each other, and if they did, it surely would have been after she was back home and they had to "deal" with the situation, along with supports, as a whole. She would have had her day in court, and it would have been up to a judge to decide culpability.

Instead, they acted kindly, and well...like I said, hindsight is 20/20...(probably literally this shit will be on 20/20.

We look at our officers to do a job. Not to make "clinical" decisions in the field. The police officer's job is to bring someone into custody (that broke the law) so that the law can enact its justice. It's ALMOST CERTAINLY NOT for them to make judgements in the field about why someone broke the law or had an experience they don't really understand.

From seeing the things regarding Petitio, I don't think she was nuts. But yes, she was having a moment...

I can certainly see where the fam doesn't want people focusing on her mental health. Having anxiety or OCD does NOT make it okay to be victimized. In this case...If she were actually trying to climb through the window, because she was afraid he would leave her alone...That should be more than enough to see him as the aggressor. She's trying to make peace, and/or not be left behind, which means she was scared of being alone, and wouldn't walk off by herself.

Which brings me to the stigma of mental illness. You know, I was ALMOST there. Trying to entertain the idea that maybe some people (myself included) might have some form of mental illness and it could help speaking about it. But if anything, Thank You, Ms. Petitio...You've proven to me once again, never to blame a situation on yourself. Never admit to a mental illness no matter how benign. Because it will absolutely be used against you.

You were a perfectly normal, and human, person.

As for the Laundrie fam, I see the documentary already, "Dirty Laundrie", 'airing now'.

Anyway, my main point was, police officers aren't psychologists. And we need more, BUT that doesn't mean we turn them into them.
 

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Can you provide a brief summary of the case? I don't have any idea what you're talking about.
 

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Can you provide a brief summary of the case? I don't have any idea what you're talking about.
Google "Gabby Petito" She had mental health issues, possibly bi-polar and most likely anxiety. She was beating up her boyfriend while he was driving, got the cops called on them. When pulled over, they both said they loved the other and neither wanted anyone arrested. The police determined they were unable to find enough cause to arrest either one, and absent a cooperative witness/accuser, there was no case. If there were a case, she'd be the one arrested, the boyfriend had injuries and they both told a similar story about how he got them from her. The police let them both go on their way. Gabby Petito hasn't been seen alive since.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Jesus people, read the news. Brief summary.

Gabbie Potito (an aspiring travel youtuber) set off on a road trip with HS sweetheart Laundrie. They documented their trip starting from 7/2 until August 24th ( I think) and on 9/11 the Petito family reported their daughter as missing. After that the Laundrie boy returned home with their shared van and it seems a lawyer was instantly (or priorly) retained, and he and the fam refused to speak to anyone. While the petito fam lamented for information about their daughter, the Laundrie fam remained silent, "Under the guidance of council" since in most of these cases they look at the SO first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jesus people, read the news. Brief summary.

Gabbie Potito (an aspiring travel youtuber) set off on a road trip with HS sweetheart Laundrie. They documented their trip starting from 7/2 until August 24th ( I think) and on 9/11 the Petito family reported their daughter as missing. After that the Laundrie boy returned home with their shared van and it seems a lawyer was instantly (or priorly) retained, and he and the fam refused to speak to anyone. While the petito fam lamented for information about their daughter, the Laundrie fam remained silent, "Under the guidance of council" since in most of these cases they look at the SO first.
When they FBI got involved and they started searching the area where Ms. Petitio was last seen, suddenly the Laundrie fam reported their son as missing for three days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When they FBI got involved and they started searching the area where Ms. Petitio was last seen, suddenly the Laundrie fam reported their son as missing for three days.
To date, Petitio's remains were found at a campsite, and Laundrie (her fiance) is still in the wind. Presumed missing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
But that's not the point of my thread! The point of my thread was about police reform and the psych behind it. In this case the police did the "right" thing. Quoting what they saw as an emotional incident, and that's super refreshing, right?

On the same token, it wasn't. And the more we create police that second guess their decisions or their stance to uphod the law...the more things become confusing....

Unless someone can please tell me how this helps in the long run?
 

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Google "Gabby Petito" She had mental health issues, likely bi-polar. She was beating up her boyfriend while he was driving, got the cops called on them. When pulled over, they both said they loved the other and neither wanted anyone arrested. The police determined they were unable to find enough cause to arrest either one, and absent a cooperative witness/accuser, there was no case. If there were a case, she'd be the one arrested, the boyfriend had injuries and they both told a similar story about how he got them from her. The police let them both go on their way. Gabby Petito hasn't been seen alive since.
Thanks. This is typical of DV cases, regardless of the gender of the abuser. If the abusee won't press charges, they have no witnesses so the abuser goes free.

Since this is in the psychology sub, if she suffered from a mental health condition, they'd have to rule her as insane before she could escape prosecution, presuming they arrested her which they didn't. Mental health issues won't necessary equate to insanity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Google "Gabby Petito" She had mental health issues, possibly bi-polar and most likely anxiety. She was beating up her boyfriend while he was driving, got the cops called on them. When pulled over, they both said they loved the other and neither wanted anyone arrested. The police determined they were unable to find enough cause to arrest either one, and absent a cooperative witness/accuser, there was no case. If there were a case, she'd be the one arrested, the boyfriend had injuries and they both told a similar story about how he got them from her. The police let them both go on their way. Gabby Petito hasn't been seen alive since.
Also, no where in the situation did it mention Bipolar or BPD...You people seriously need to stop confusing these things.
 

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But that's not the point of my thread! The point of my thread was about police reform and the psych behind it. In this case the police did the "right" thing. Quoting what they saw as an emotional incident, and that's super refreshing, right?

On the same token, it wasn't. And the more we create police that second guess their decisions or their stance to uphod the law...the more things become confusing....

Unless someone can please tell me how this helps in the long run?
If the police apprehended every emotional train wreck of a person, our jails would overfill in about 6 hours. I have cop friends and neighbors that have all talked about their work with me, and anyone that watches an episode of COPS knows this.

Arresting her for DV would have saved her life, no doubt. The other DV situations they deal with every day, what about them? Arrest all of them and let the courts sort it out?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think we're getting a little off topic here but I understand if you guys need time to run down all the possible scenarios...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If the police apprehended every emotional train wreck of a person, our jails would overfill in about 6 hours. I have cop friends and neighbors that have all talked about their work with me, and anyone that watches an episode of COPS knows this.

Arresting her for DV would have saved her life, no doubt. The other DV situations they deal with every day, what about them? Arrest all of them and let the courts sort it out?
Thank you! This is the exact question I was posing when starting the thread. You can see it's about police reform and the pros and cons when it comes to mental illness, and our responses or stances to how the police should conduct themselves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If the police apprehended every emotional train wreck of a person, our jails would overfill in about 6 hours. I have cop friends and neighbors that have all talked about their work with me, and anyone that watches an episode of COPS knows this.

Arresting her for DV would have saved her life, no doubt. The other DV situations they deal with every day, what about them? Arrest all of them and let the courts sort it out?
Isn't that exactly what they're supposed to do?
 

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Thank you! This is the exact question I was posing when starting the thread. You can see it's about police reform and the pros and cons when it comes to mental illness, and our responses or stances to how the police should conduct themselves.
I have a very close family member that has had many "interactions" with the police, including him getting me involved in those interactions. He has mental health disabilities and lives in a disability home at the moment, so it's not just that he's a little off. I've seen this stuff up close and personal when police are involved. I think in 100% of the cases I've seen or been involved with they did a very good job of finding balance between protecting the public interests, keeping him (and me) safe, and allowing him to held reasonably accountable but not "punished" for his disability.

If they did less, more people would get hurt. If they did more, more people would get hurt. If they stay the same, people will still get hurt. It's not their problem to solve, and sometimes the laws about safety and mental health issues collide.

Their job has gotten too complex.
 

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Isn't that exactly what they're supposed to do?
No. Otherwise we'd have way too many people locked up. We already have too many. More than any other civilized country by %. And this stuff still happens. We can't just arrest them all every time. Mental health incidents are often transient, even when driven by a permanent disability. Prison doesn't do much to correct that. It's also highly stigmatizing. Imagine getting arrested every time you cried or got angry... Crying is a sign of mental health issues, so is getting angry.

The threshold is (and needs to be) "are you hurting anyone or a serious and articulable danger to anyone?" If no, no arrest.
 

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The threshold is (and needs to be) "are you hurting anyone or a serious and articulable danger to anyone?" If no, no arrest.
That should indeed be fair law, but it doesn't stop certain official military and police bodies from commiting those transgressions on mass scale for the sake of political and economic interests.

Hence why giving them even more power would be extremely unwise.
 

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Ok, again I didn’t read everyone’s

but just talking about the police

not everything is so black and white, anywhere in life. And sometimes we make judgments calls. You just can’t go or should always go by the same rules for every person in every situation. Unfortunately sometimes it’s the wrong call, but you really don’t know how things wI’ll be if they did, the same thing could of happen, we still dont know, if he purposely did something, if she did something to herself or what. So, if she is suicidal taking her to jail could be worse, you are not force to get help….you or family are responsible for getting yourself help not waiting to be force…that is something cops can’t make ppl do…each state is a little different.

so, what I saw from the police videos

she is very upset and crying, emotional
one she admits to having anxiety and ocd
and she takes it out on him, but it sounds like verbally more than anything…freaks out emotionally.

there were scratches they found on his face… the only marks, and you couldn’t even see them on camera, no blood, no bruises etc. the cop didn’t witness the hitting, just bad driving…also remember unlike most DV, but not all, it is call in, no one call to report DViolence, usually that’s when a cop has to take someone in bc it was reported or the cop witness it themselives.

Also, the cops were thinking about how they are not from there,Uath, I think…but from Florida, which is very far away, which means they will have to come back for court, months later etc, they knew this is not easy or practical for a few scratches which is another element they factor in, why they let her go.
also, when you are charge that goes permanently on your record.

there was a witness, but they say she was the aggressor but didn’t actually see violence and they (cops) almost brought her in, but the fight didn’t seem that physical just yelling and hand swaying. And in the video, they (cops) went back and forth with the idea taking her in and explain it isn’t about gender….but for them they decided to let them go, after much deliberation and making sure they find to legally let her go, which they did find a clause…separate them for the night, and if you watch live cops shows they make calls like this often on DV cases or roommates fights, landlords and tenants, etc, bc ppl fight/argue sometimes.

they did separate for the night, they took him to a hotel and didn’t tell her where until morning. And if they would of took her to jail, they would have let her out by the next day anyways, and he would of pick her up or bonded her out.

so, honesty, I do think we need police reform but not in this case. I really believe the cops try to use their best judgment and unfortunately she is missing/sorry dead. But again this might of been unavoidable bc of her mental state. I believe it is very unfortunate this is how it turn out and I bet those cops are wondering “what if” but the truth is that we all can’t know everything that happens. There is no way for those cops to know this.

i Also really believe watching the cop video they really did try and look at every angle of the situation. I thought they did a good job but unfortunately it might of been the wrong call, but we still don’t know…what happen and she would of been back with him in a day or so anyways…so it might of not may any differences, since they were separated for the night.
 

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Still amazed how much press this is getting. Of all the police actions that could use some scrutiny and reform in the States.


Missing white woman syndrome
is a term used by social scientists[1][2][3] and media commentators to refer to the alleged disproportionate media coverage, especially in television,[4] of missing-person cases involving young, white, upper-middle-class women or girls compared to the relative lack of attention towards missing women who are not white, women of lower social classes, and missing men or boys.[5][6]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missing_white_woman_syndrome#cite_note-Armstrong2013-6
 
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