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This post is to evaluate a thought I've had regarding the optimal methods of thought between ENTP and INTJ. To understand what I mean and where I am going with this, I will build the idea starting from the base 4 cognitive functions:

ENTP: Ne Ti Fe Si
INTJ: Ni Te Fi Se

How does an ENTP solve problems logically, using game theory as a framework of comparison?

Ne- In game theory, Ne sees alternative perspectives and develops possibilities.
Ti- Ti evaluates the possibilities found by Ne according to a reductive logic - which
of these possibilities will fail when viewed against a particular criteria? In game
theory, this is working out a particular way of doing something in a very exacting
way, until either some sort of pitfall is reached or the idea is accepted as a valid
solution and worthy of comparison to other valid solutions.
Fe- Sympathetic, understanding how implimentation of the logic might affect other
people. In game theory, this is understanding how others might react to the
game actions you take.
Si- In game theory, this is the database of memories. It is a large knowledge base
by which comparisons can be made. If the database is sufficiently large and the
data is sufficiently relevant, it can significantly cut down the amount of time Ti
needs to evaluate the possibilities brought in by Ne. A well developed Si will
mean that some possibilities will be discounted prior to even evaluating a deep
level of Ti, purely on the basis of comparison to past failures.

What this all means in game theory:

ENTP are particularly good at:

- Identifying methods that are atypical
- Efficiently using time to evaluate possibilities. ENTPs benefit from taking extra time.
- Identifying how games with other people might play out, but only if the other people
are known or can be evaluated in some way to accurately determine reactions.
- Learning via repetition, the ability to immediately discount ideas based on past
failures.

ENTP pitfalls:

- ENTP will be slow, especially when precision is desired.
- ENTP will suffer easily from analysis paralysis if the system is too abstract for the
ENTP to evaluate quickly with Ti and Si.
- Large knowledge base is necessary to work efficiently. ENTP might not be all that
good at making strong decisions the first time through, as too many ideas will
overwhelm the Ti without Si to help.
- ENTP might be lost or make poor evaluations of what others will do, if the others
are strangers.

Now compare this to INTJ logic in game theory:

Ni- Sees one particular logical method, in a split second, that will reach the goal. All
is clear.
Te- Implements the idea put forth by Ni very clearly and methodically, using whatever
tools are available to do so. When the tools to do so are not available, this is no
problem at all, as the INTJ are masters of contingency and will immediately use Ni
again to see the next best solution and feed that back to Te to try again.
Fi- Evaluates by empathy. This means the INTJ will be very good at deducing what
others *should* be doing, based on the logic of their own Ni. If the INTJ is
particularly smart, virtually every best option will easily and effortlessly be
identified, fed back into Ni and Te, and contingencies will follow to avoid allowing
others to find easy advantage.
Se- This is for taking in data from the environment. A well developed Se will mean
the INTJ notices every single detail. In game theory, this means that their Ni will
be incredibly accurate with sufficient intelligence, as all the data of the game will
be noticed and considered by Ni.

What this all means:

INTJ are particularly good at:

- Working quickly and efficiently, with a quickly identified objective.
- Contingencies. The INTJ does not need to start from scratch every time to make
an idea work, and in fact prefers to keep the system, but just alter it slightly, in
order to increase efficiency.
- Very good at identifying the best possible strategies *others* should be making,
and acting accordingly.
- Notices everything external. Don't try to cheat an INTJ by taking extra loot, they will notice! :)

INTJ pitfalls:

- Might become obsessed with a particular intuitive idea, so much so as to not see superior alternatives that might
not be so easily intuited.
- Efficiency might cause the INTJ to be "impulsive" in an odd way, and skeptical of ideas that were not originally
pioneered by their own Ni. If their own generated Ni idea is a strong one, then the word impulsive would never be
used to describe the INTJ (it "worked" after all!), although that is the most apt descriptor.
- In game theory, if others opposing the INTJ do something abnormal, or at least not quite like what the INTJ would
have intuited as the strongest solution with Ni (such as a solution that required a great deal of Ti and/or Si to
acquire), the INTJ may be blindsided, not expecting the move. INTJ is limited by the empathic nature of Fi.
- Se might give information overload, if too many stimuli are present. This could cause the Ni to go a bit haywire,
until Ni can dispose of options. This can lead to make the INTJ a bit slow in this aspect.
 

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Ni- Sees one particular logical method, in a split second, that will reach the goal. All
is clear.
Te- Implements the idea put forth by Ni very clearly and methodically, using whatever
tools are available to do so. When the tools to do so are not available, this is no
problem at all, as the INTJ are masters of contingency and will immediately use Ni
again to see the next best solution and feed that back to Te to try again.
Fi- Evaluates by empathy. This means the INTJ will be very good at deducing what
others *should* be doing, based on the logic of their own Ni. If the INTJ is
particularly smart, virtually every best option will easily and effortlessly be
identified, fed back into Ni and Te, and contingencies will follow to avoid allowing
others to find easy advantage.

Se- This is for taking in data from the environment. A well developed Se will mean
the INTJ notices every single detail. In game theory, this means that their Ni will
be incredibly accurate with sufficient intelligence, as all the data of the game will
be noticed and considered by Ni.

INTJ are particularly good at:

- Working quickly and efficiently, with a quickly identified objective.
- Contingencies. The INTJ does not need to start from scratch every time to make
an idea work, and in fact prefers to keep the system, but just alter it slightly, in
order to increase efficiency.
- Very good at identifying the best possible strategies *others* should be making,
and acting accordingly.
Interesting theory. I took a game theory class from an ENTP last year and it was fascinating to observe how into it he was and the way he explained things. I'd routinely leave with my mind blown after listening to him talk, but I sucked like no other... except for when we actually played games. I won our class tournament of liar's dice, but ENTP found my concentration stare/poker face very disturbing. This is a pretty decent analysis of how I played. Actually a pretty decent analysis of how I play most games, not just the ones specific to that class.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Interesting theory. I took a game theory class from an ENTP last year and it was fascinating to observe how into it he was and the way he explained things. I'd routinely leave with my mind blown after listening to him talk, but I sucked like no other... except for when we actually played games. I won our class tournament of liar's dice, but ENTP found my concentration stare/poker face very disturbing. This is a pretty decent analysis of how I played. Actually a pretty decent analysis of how I play most games, not just the ones specific to that class.
Yes, I am sure you are a complete enigma to all but the most skilled Fe users. The only way for someone with Fe to succeed against an Ni/Te stone cold stare is by understanding MBTI, or just neglect Fe evaluations all-together and create counter-confusion for the INTJ through Ne/Ti. :)

That is to say, the ENTP should make suboptimal moves on purpose, especially seemingly arbitrary ones, so long as there is enough of a strategy present to enforce a strong plan derived from that suboptimal move. Forcing an INTJ to use Ti will promote temporary confusion, until Ni/Te has developed a contingency plan. The more the suboptimal move disrupts the original Ni/Te plan, the more confusing, to the point that the INTJ might become visibly angry through successive suboptimal moves. I have actually enacted this plan before in a boardgame called age of steam, it was very entertaining to watch.
 

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Forcing an INTJ to use Ti will promote temporary confusion, until Ni/Te has developed a contingency plan. The more the suboptimal move disrupts the original Ni/Te plan, the more confusing, to the point that the INTJ might become visibly angry through successive suboptimal moves. I have actually enacted this plan before in a boardgame called age of steam, it was very entertaining to watch.
Yes, this is why I'm not allowed to play most games unless they're card games or creative games. Monopoly turns me into a 5 year old having a temper tantrum :tongue:
 
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