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To the casual observer, the two might appear the same or similar. In reality, they obviously share some similarities in style and punk music affiliation (or post-punk or whatever you want to call it), though their approach is much different. We can see this by comparing Sunny Day Real Estate with Bauhaus, Jawbreaker with Joy Division or Death Cab for Cutie with London After Midnight. I think the goth style is cooler and more "bad-ass" in form, though emo has it's place too for those who want to open up to feeling. Maybe one is more F-type while another thinks with detachment? Which style do you see yourself liking more? Maybe both? Perhaps neither?
 

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Mmm I don't think that's quite it. They both have their roots in romanticism as an artistic expression, and there are hints of goth in some emo bands (I actually love My Chemical Romance as they achieved a blend of emo and energetic late 90s/early 00's pop with Gothic undertones, something some people mocked, but I enjoy them immensely in the right mood).

Goth and emo also both take themselves pretty seriously. Just as many mainstream people had a laugh at goth as they did at emo. A bunch of vampires walking around and going to concerts so they can cross their arms and be stone faced? Yeah, people had a go at that as well.

However, I think it's astute to point out greater displays of emotion in emo (except well duh haha) but that goth seems to lack overt expression of emotion. ..I don't think that makes emo more "F" though...goth was more atmospheric and deliberate creation of feeling, there's lots of feeling in goth, it's just not external display of emotion. Ian Curtis is famously known for being an INFP.
 

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Eh, both begin with a seemingly similar mindset, I guess...

I definitely gravitate more towards gothic culture, but that's just me. Perhaps its heavily influenced by my attraction to Gothic literature.

Emo, to me, seemed well emotional, and gothic seemed more detached and jaded.

I'll have to look into this further, though.
 

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I honestly like both of them. In late childhood/early teens I liked the Cure, I had a poet shirt, snuck my purple lipstick to school in 9th grade, put baby powder on my face, but my late childhood and early teens were in the middle of the Anne Rice craze, and I liked horror movies, so it all suited me. ...I was just too young for most of it, it was actually in early adulthood I learned from friends who were older about Sisters of Mercy, the Cult, Joy Division, and liked Siouxsie and the Banshees and Bauhaus probably twenty years after they were first popular. I include Concrete Blondes Bloodletting album in that though, which I owned in my teens.

It's just that emo was more present and relevant as I grew older, and I really appreciated the intense kind of let it all out quality. I like both for different reasons. Goth is actually more kooky in a way.
 

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I think in terms of bands, I think people who like that stuff, today, I guess my generation would be more CURE, people would listen to Evanescence, Linkin Park, And the Sun Will Set For You, would be in heavy rotation, on their iphone, with maybe some Muse, to round it out, but, I think MUSE is too well rounded, even on their romantic stuff like Starlight, to be be considered in the ballpark of a Linkin Park listening. Knights of Cydonia, might be too much in breaking from the rules of a emo or goth song. It's like Genesis. You have your classic five with Collins, Gabreil, Hackett, Rutherford, and, Banks, and, they do very artsy prog stuff like Supper's Ready, which is about the Book of Revelation, and, Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, then as it goes to 4, there's just Trick of A Tail, then after Hackett ,and, Gabreil depart, you get more mainstream pop hits like, Man on A Corner, Land of Confusion, Follow You, Follow Me. So, you have your true believers, then you have the people who only know the Collins era.
 
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Goth is surreal and psychedelic (the visual aesthetics aside), heavily influenced by German progressive/psych rock; where post-punk got its sound. I don't know what 'emo' is really supposed to be... I know about some 'post-hardcore' music, some of it is good.. some is shit. But it's obviously not even remotely in the same category, other than the 'punk' background. My favourite Gothic bands are Lycia and Trance to the Sun, and the only 'emo' I have is Envy. So I'm siding with Goth.
 

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I like emo more than goth. With goth, I think more of nu metal bands of the late 90s/early 00s and sometimes industrial bands like Skinny Puppy and Ministry. I also think more of the look of goth people with goth style and makeup. I am not too well-versed in real Goth, I suppose. Maybe not as attracted to it as well.

I've always been a emo person for some reason. Though I like atmospheric kind of stuff as well at times. I am a fan of the confessional kind of thing with emo music, but a lot of the emo bands I like don't really like the emo label. It's kind of limiting at times and used as a marketing label. There's more of a pop element and conventional structure to emo, I think (but not always). These bands definitely were influenced by hardcore and late 70s punk for sure and even other stuff too like My Bloody Valentine (I love MBV). MBV is shoegaze...which is a whole another label and genre. One of my favorite bands' leaders(Joan of Arc) swears by Bauhaus. I haven't heard them yet, but I've meaning to check them out. Joan of Arc has been labeled as an emo band on and off.
 
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I can't stand either of them. They seem like nothing more than desperate screams for attention to me.
 

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Goth
started in the 70s, grew in popularity in the 80s
post-punk musical roots
vocal style is often sparse or ethereal
themes of finding beauty in tragedy or darkness
moods: cold, introspective, melancholy





Emo
started in the 80s, grew in popularity in the 90s
post-hardcore musical roots
vocal style is often screaming or melodic
themes of heartbreak, sadness, anger
moods: maudlin, bitter, angsty




Both might have come from punk, but I think they're pretty distinct from one another.

I personally like goth more than I do emo. I relate more to the vibe of Joy Division more than that of Sunny Day Real Estate... but I could see Fi being prominent in both cases, maybe?
 

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Goth actually has its origins in the Romantic movement of the 18th (or was it 19th? I'm so bad with dates) century, taking a lot of influence both in looks and ideals to the decadence and melancholia of the movement. Let's remember that the Gothic Novel (aka Gothic Horror) had it's origins in the 18th century with Mary Shelley and Edgar Allen Poe. It's legally was the Pulp Fiction of the Weird Tales magazine and H.P. Lovecraft.
The Gothic has a love for the night, darkness, death, sorrow and mystery just like the Romanticism had.

List of gothic fiction works - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A good example of modern day Gothic can be the mangaka (Japanese comic book author) Junji Ito, who focus on horror and the surreal. Uzumkai is a good example of his work and it's about a town which is obsessed with spirals. It's rather Lovecraftian.







Another good example of what appeals to the Gothic is the (again) Japanese movie Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust.


And the novels that inspired it.



You also have to take in consideration that some forms of Goth are very inspired by Medieval culture (which is what art calls Goth or Gothic).

This might help too Goth subculture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I don't know that much about emo, so I'll leave the wikipedia article which might help as well Emo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


As for visuals...



Gothic is a bit like Steampunk, it's influenced by Victorian fashion, though sometimes it might take influences from Medieval fashion and some leathery looks that a Black Metal band would use. Gothic tents to be elegant which darker colours (though red and white will be present at times) and will, sometimes, focus of the sex appeal of the human body.



People are wanted with fair skin, with lips painted in red or black and with long black hair (or in darker colours). Blonde is also common, probably due to the concept of Laura as the perfect woman from Dante's works. Both men and women are allowed to use makeup.



Short hair is fine too, tho.


This is what come up when I look for emo fashion






I hope I helped.
 

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Okay, the term "Emo" I'm pretty sure is just some contrived term created predominately by business companies to capitalize on teen-angst. I don't think it's actually real.

Yes, I know some bands use that term to describe their music, but the ones who do often I think are simply musicians who write corporate commercial music. It's god-damn stupid.

It's now become more or less an insult synonymous with whatever someone finds emotional-expressive, and is to them, "over-the-top"

But may I bring up Classical Music and even I dare-say Opera?
It's a part of that style of music to emphasis emotional expressive. Fuck them.
 
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