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Well, in June, I'll be graduating high school, and next, I'll be going to college.

The thing is though, I have two options for college.

I could stay at home and go to a community college.

or I could move away to college and live on campus.


I feel like going to a community college would be good because it saves a lot of money, but I feel like I need to get out on my own and out of my parents' house.


What do you think?
 

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Congrats! I think you would gain a lot of good much needed experience living on your own, plus college loans tend to have low interest rates. If you want to be safe, you can always go live in the dorms at a college within 30-40 minutes from your house, and if it doesn't work for you, then you can move back in with your parents. Gas rates aren't too bad now.
 

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That is a good idea. See, moving out is just great, because you get to have the whole day for yourself. You can use it the way you want to. If you like planing your day, you can do that, if you like to be completely spontaneous, you can do that as well.

Do you already know what you want to study in college? This question is an important one. If you are not sure yet, i really would advise to get to know the different disciplines/subjects early enough.
i for example changed my discipline after 4 semesters, because it was not interesting enough for me...(And being intp without interest there is a lot less learning and motivation...;)

Ogion
 

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Stay at home and go to a community college. It's best to get all your core class credits out of the way at a community college then at a higher level college. It's a lot easier and will save on stress.
 

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What is more valuable to you, what you would be saving, or your 'own place'?

I would be among those who would suggest that, especially if you don't know what exactly you want to be doing, but still know you want to go to college, that you check out the community college.
 

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Academically, which one is the better college? If they're the same you might as well save money and stay at home.
 

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Community college is very good for you. You basically learn the same subjects and are in a smaller class unlike universities. The only differences between the two are the price, the ease of getting into, and the degrees.
 

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Is the education or the resulting occupation more relevant to your goals?

If the prior is true, remain for community college. Establish a sound knowledge base, and that way you will have an increased awareness of what you aim to achieve through your learning. Should the later be more so applicable, be certain of what you wish to use your degree for (possible not a P strong point) and ensure you have numerous extracurricular experiences to enhance your CV.
 

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what they said... it depends on you and who you are. Community college education is just fine, but living away from parents can really make a difference in you.

Why not just look at state school? If you're in state they're not usually a whole lot more expensive than community colleges, but you'll still be able to get out and live on your own.
 

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Go to school to become an X ray tech. Then work part time as a Tech while you figure out what you want to do. You will make like 30 an hour.
 

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Weighing the pros and cons of staying home vs studying away from home, is a requisite. I suggest that you whip up a brainstorm on a piece of paper or whichever way most suited to you, and conclude what would be the best option.

Let me give you a brief idea in light of this.

First of all, as a few members above have already mentioned, check in to see which of the two colleges is academically preferable. If there's little to no difference between the majors you're intending to study, you might find that staying home will be better than to scoot off to another town/city/country. I think it's really important for you to assess what you want out of education - it could be that living away from home offers what's right for you, or the contrary.

There are a number of factors pertaining to the consideration of studying away:
1) Leaving the comfort of your own home - can you do this? It's easier for some more than others.
2) You'll be attending lectures/seminars, but not just those alone - you will be forced to maintain both your academic and other responsibilities that come in toe with independence.
3) Bogged under mountains of bills and debts - at what stage do you think you're most prepared at in order to face these challenges head on? You can save money.

Staying home tends to lower some burdens of expenses. Besides, you can decide to branch out on your own once graduated from college - you'll still gain the opportunity to live away.

Anyhu, I recommend that you assess what you want out of education, bearing in mind (on the contrary to what I said above), that college is not only or always about classes; it's also learning how to be an adult, responsible for yourself and figuring out how to live on your own in an environment where you can get help if needed. Of course this kind of experience is not limited to academic life alone, and you'll have bear opportunities to feel this...but unless you want to broaden your horizons and objectives at this stage, I suggest you stay home.

Ciao.
 

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The only thing positive that I gained from going to college was the opportunity to get away from my family's influence to establish my independence. I have forgotten all of the useless trivia I learned there, and what sticks with me is the social freedom I had. I finally got to see who I would be without anyone trying to shape me into something else. My self-confidence increased and I learned how to interact with my peers in ways that didn't involve being slammed against locker doors.
 

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by the way congratz for u r graduation day..this is my advice..
i suggest to continue ur schooling since u can afford ur colleges financial..

good luck for your life....
 

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Hello.

I like what NightWine said: make your decision based on what is important to you. Attending a four-year

college or enrolling in a community college offer different benefits at different expenses. As what has been

namely mentioned above, a community college offers its substantial benefits: it's close to home,

inexpensive, and will focus on getting your core studies out of the way. That way, when you enter

community college, you can take on two years aimed at your interests. Also, those two years of CC offer

more exploratory room for potential career placement by exposing you to an array of fields all at once,

without feeling pressured by your peers around you, a considerable bunch whom already declared. In sum,

it helps you keep your options open and moves you forward at the same time. I, personally, three years

into college, now wonder why I didn't invest in the resourcefulness of attending a community college.


Attending a four-year college offers its benefits, as well. Some people want the "experience" aspect of

being a Freshmen, in all that that encompasses. Not saying that education is in any nature of the world

unimportant, but that being independent and mindful of your own choices. That was largely my mindset

upon entering college. It was important for me to be my own boss, separated by four-hundred miles of

high-way pavement from my parents. But not everyone has that luxury, depending on your financial

plans and how you think you would be most satisfied. However, if money is an issue, you could just

as easily attend a four-year state school and pay maybe a little more than you would for a community

college. Not only would the tuition be cheaper, but as goes for most college in the United States, you

can apply for scholarships. If you excel at a sports or academics program, it is highly-possible to receive

financial benefits from the school to attend for a lower price and do what you love. Then again, ultimately,

it all comes down to what you value.

For future reference, I recommend speaking with your school Guidance Counselor. S/he can offer more

insight than I could in this reply, being professionally trained to help people just like you.

Good luck - not that you need it or anything.


--Res
 
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