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Hi guys, I wonder if anyone is knowledgeable about hair health here? :kitteh:

I feel that my hair needs some care, since it often looks too dry with split ends... I wash my hair daily (shampoo and conditioner) as it tends to get oily soon (or maybe I'm just too obsessed about clean hair), but lately I've stopped drying it in hope that it can reduce the damage.

So anyone knows any tips for improving the hair health? I've heard of keratin treatment, but I'm not sure if it's useful or what it really is, as what I can find on the internet seems to show that the effect is only temporary, and it looks like some sort of hair straightening rather than treatment.
 

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l am a fan of coconut oil. Deep condition or just a tiny bit on the ends of dry hair.

lt takes around 8 hours to absorb fully so l use it at night if l'm going to. lt penetrates the hair shaft and can repair damage.

Also, l just use a huge vat from the baking aisle that l melt with a blow dryer (6.00), but professional oil for hair is available...no real difference aside from packaging.

l also use Keratin treatment, but that is more for straightening and restructuring hair.
 

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Hot water and chlorine removes the sebum (the oily stuff that makes your hair shiny) and without the sebum, the hair is easily damaged. Blow drying similarly removes the sebum. Try using non-chlorinated water (get a water filter) and Johnson's baby shampoo for a while. Also, go find out more about biotin (I think it's a B vitamin, but I'm not certain.). Read some of the reviews on Amazon. It's supposed to be good for hair, skin, and finger nails.
 

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Try doing hair mask using olive oil, avocado, yogurt, or banana (be warned, use a blender and don't mash because the pieces of banana are hard to get out of your hair).

Also, shower in cold water, it helps seal moisture and oils from the hair.

Use Mane and Tail conditioner or any moisturizing conditioner.

Don't rub your hair with a towel when you dry it and don't blow dry your hair either. Let your hair air dry.

Refrain from using heat products or use them less frequently if at all.

Don't brush your hair after you shower because hair is sensitive and very breakable when it's wet.

Don't sleep with wet hair, the hair will break because the fibers of the pillow will mess with your hair.

Use shampoos that don't contain Lauryl/Sodium Sulfate. Use a shampoo like Johnson and Johnson baby shampoo.

Don't shower so often. Shower every two days if you must. You strip away the oils from your hair if you frequently shower, especially in hot water leading to dry, brittle, damaged hair.

I hope this helped. :proud:
 

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Biotin is wonderful stuff. But in a minority of cases it can make people break out with pimples. Definitely take Biotin, try it out. It will not only cause your hair to grow in thicker and stronger but it will make your sebum thicker so that when you brush the sebum through your hair it will keep it from breaking so easily. Worked for me.

Also, if you must shampoo your hair every day, either use baking soda in place of shampoo(mix a few tablespoons in water, then run through hair. make sure to wash completely out of your hair or it will be brittle) or condition in advance, then shampoo, then condition again. I always run conditioner and water through my hair in advance and let it sit for a few minutes before I shampoo. Other alternatives to shampoo are soapnuts and shikakai powder.

You can do herbal rinses with catnip, nettles and horsetail. I like to actually put the herbal tea in a spray bottle, diluted, and spray on my hair and roots. It definitely adds "spring" to my hair.

Some people like to rinse their hair with apple cider vinegar and wash it out. I find that it makes my hair a bit greasy but others swear by it.

Other vitamins/supplements besides biotin would be a good, whole food B complex, MSM powder, silica powder, kelp powder, flax seed oil and making sure to get enough vitamin C. MSM powder on the scalp can grow your hair more quickly. Make sure to get enough water, preferably water that is not fluoridated.

Try these things and your hair WILL become very tough, so tough that you can yank on it and it won't break.
 

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Hi guys, I wonder if anyone is knowledgeable about hair health here? :kitteh:

I feel that my hair needs some care, since it often looks too dry with split ends... I wash my hair daily (shampoo and conditioner) as it tends to get oily soon (or maybe I'm just too obsessed about clean hair), but lately I've stopped drying it in hope that it can reduce the damage.

So anyone knows any tips for improving the hair health? I've heard of keratin treatment, but I'm not sure if it's useful or what it really is, as what I can find on the internet seems to show that the effect is only temporary, and it looks like some sort of hair straightening rather than treatment.
I, like @OMG WTF BRO use oil on my ends. But, I found that coconut oil was too thick and oily, so I used jojoba oil, which actually mimics the sebum and oils in your skin. It doesn't end up feeling 'oily' when using it, and it doesn't look so either. It was very effective for me.

I generally have trouble with dry hair, because my hair is so incredibly thick and coarse-- Wavy, and very long. People are often envious of my hair volume, but I often wish I had nice thin hair that was easier to deal with. Still, I guess my hair is movie star material. Yay.

So I actually opt to wash it only rarely (Sometimes can go two weeks without a wash, but I prefer once a week), and even then it has dryness issues. Even when using shampoos and conditioners that are all natural, without sulfates.

Hair is very subjective. But, if you have dryness problems, don't wash it every single day. Every other day is fine, or however much you think is optimal.

It's not unhygienic to go without washing if your hair needs it.

I have found that this method of shampooing and conditioning is best. Make sure to get your fingers under and to the roots when shampooing! I made the mistake of always shampooing randomly on top and rubbing it around.


Also, after all the cleansing, it sometimes helps to rinse with cold water, which is said to close hair follicles (I'm not sure if this is true, but it seems to make hair shinier.)

I have not tried oil treatments on my hair yet, but many people swear by doing this every week. I probably should, due to the nature of my hair. I have not yet found a brand I can trust, but I very much like buying products from iherb.com since they are all natural and animal friendly.
 

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All that has been said above + one recipe that works for me:

Extra virgin olive oil + 1 teaspoon of organic honey: warm up the mixture until it's still comfortable to the touch and work into your hair, massage into scalp and let it sit for a good 30 minutes. You might want to wrap a towel around: it drips. Then wash it out as normal, make sure to get it all out.

Also, a final rinse with apple cider vinegar followed by cold water will give your hair a nice shine.
 

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aaaahhhh... my area of expertise =^_^= I've been a hairdresser going on six years and have healthy hair past my tailbone with very few splits and minimal damage, despite the abuse I gave it in hair school and for the couple of years after I graduated (a hairdresser's hair gets brutalized during hair school. It's a wonder we all don't graduate bald-headed) and wearing it down about 5 days a week.

ooohkay. First off, split ends start for a variety of reasons, so we can go ahead and tackle the main culprits and key points of removal / "repair" and prevention there:
- Once a hair is split or damaged, there is no fixing it. It is damaged, end of story, curtain falls, thanks for coming, we hope you enjoyed the show. There is NO way of repairing them. Things like keratin treatments can temporarily bond the pieces back together and provide the illusion of repair, but there really is no way to get rid of them save for taking a pair of hair shears (not kitchen scissors or anything else lying about your house. They must be sharp. If you use blunt shears to remove splits, you will only encourage more splits because it crushes and abrades the hair end, which over time will develop into a split instead of creating a clean cut) and snipping above the split.
- When you wash, brush, towel dry, blow dry or anything else you do to your hair, you are creating friction in and on the hair. This friction encourages splits and damage. The more you mess with your hair, the more damaged it will be. "Polishing" with a dryer and round brush / boar bristle brush is still damaging, even if you have heat protectors and such on.

Now we can move on to discussing other important points from your post:
- Shampooing daily is not good for your hair or scalp. It tells your scalp to produce more sebum (oil) because it's being stripped out of your hair. It can also contribute to things like dandruff and an otherwise irritated scalp, also, lice and some other little critters love clean hair, it's easier to grab on to and keep hold of. To discourage oiliness and reduce friction and therefore damage, detangle prior to bathing, only shampoo your scalp and as little of your hair as possible. Sulfate free is your friend. When you're rinsing out your shampoo, it'll also remove the excess oils from your hair, so no need to scrunch up all of your hair and vigorously slosh it around. All you're doing is creating more friction and tiny little abrasions and wear marks all over each hair while at the same time removing the oils it needs to protect itself against friction and stay flexible and strong, as well as roughing up the cuticle, which cannot be repaired once it's damaged, as well as tangling the crap out of it so now you have to put more strain on it by brushing and combing more.
- Use conditioner - just don't put it on your scalp. To reduce oiliness, try only conditioning the ends and up to about 4 or 5 inches from the scalp. Conditioner helps to replenish the oils you've just stripped out of your hair. There is no real substitute for the hair's natural sebum, so doing your best to keep oils in your hair (I won't bother addressing all the ways how this can be done, other posters have pretty much explored that pretty well. My personal favourite is mixing avocado with coconut oil, jojoba, vitamin e oil and olive oil, putting it in my hair from about 5 inches down to the ends, wrapping that in a plastic bag and sitting under the hood drier for a couple of hours while doing homework or reading and then washing my hair)
- Any form of colour, texture or curl treatments from dyeing to chemical straightening and perming damage the cuticle or the strength of the hair. There is no such monster as a truly non-damaging treatment, regardless of what you've been told. Yes, Brazilian Blowout and some like systems can create the illusion of smoother cuticles and damage reparation, but that's because they're coating the hair in a layer of proteins which fill up all the porosity. Even henna and indigo, which bond permanently with the hair, do some damage and can create brittleness if not cared for properly.
-Be careful how you detangle, brush and style. Be gentle and take your time. Most people's hair responds VERY well to something along the lines of a TangleTeezer, which detangles gently. It sounds frightening when you're using it, but that's because the bristles are bending to yield to the hair, not because it's tearing the hair. I take my TangleTeezer in the shower with me and use it to rinse my hair out by brushing it through when rinsing shampoo and conditioner. I also like to finish my washing regimen with running cold water through it. It does make it shinier by encouraging the cuticle to close a bit more.
- don't rub and scrunch towel your hair to dry it. Wrap your towel around your hair and squeeze - much less damage.
- find combs, brushes, barrettes and other things with no seams (those little ridges that shower where the pieces of the mold fit together). Again, much less damage.

Happy growing! :D
 

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Coconut oil and many of the other things on here I would agree with. Without going into too many details about the disastrous state of my hair about 6 months ago, I'll just mention that it's now amazingly healthy and yes, I've cut it to help that, but it has a lot more body than it used to and slit ends (which were a crazy problem) are no longer a problem for me. It was caused by poor diet; my hair care is exactly the same as it used to be but my diet is radically different. I'm not specifically trying to eat stuff which helps my hair, I'm eating food specifically for good general health and wellbeing (real food, not supplements). I was dealing with thyroid problems (medication free), but covering many areas of general good health at the same time.
 

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Hair care is something I love to talk about! :laughing:

Biotin is vitamin H and very good for your hair. As is vitamin E, the stuff you get from fish.

But honestly, washing it everyday leaves it dry. Try an after-shampoo serum or, like someone else said, coconut oil at night, before you wash it off the next morning. I stopped oiling my hair because it's a bitch to shampoo out the oil in the morning. Use copious amounts of hair conditioner after you're done shampooing. My personal favourite is Ultra Doux by Garnier but I currently use Herbal Essences and it seems to be working.

Play around with shampoos and conditioners a little. Garnier shampoo does nothing for me but the conditioner is great, and I like Pantene Pro-V more than Dove.

Don't use heat on your hair. Towel dry and let it dry naturally.

Trim your hair often, even if you want to keep it long. Keeps split ends and thinning at bay.

Don't cover your hair a whole lot (maybe just when going out in traffic) because hair actually tends to break when covered a lot ad it might develop dandruff and itching.
 

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Wow, everyone is so informative here. I was going to say stuff but everyone pretty much covered it all! I guess all I would add is some natural shampoo/conditioner brands that I like - Nature's Gate, Yes To and Trader Joe's Tea Tree Tingle shampoo (it really does tingle). I've tried the "no poo" route just using vinegar and baking soda and couldn't stand waiting for everything to balance itself out (got way too greasy) so I stick to natural shampoos and conditioners and I like them.
 

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I've tried quite a few of the ones above. I'm going to echo @Zoof with the olive oil. I prefer just plain extra virgin olive oil, 15 seconds in the microwave. I work it in from scalp to tip. I sleep overnight with it in a shower cap and wash it out in the morning. I usually need to do this about twice a year.

I think it varies by hair type what works best. I have nearly straight dark blonde/light brown hair. I cut out all the hair dye last year and I'm letting the natural colour grow back in because I haven't seen my natural colour since... the 90's? So far the top layer of hair exposed to the sun is bleaching blonde and the hair that isn't exposed to the sun is light brown. The roots are light brown. If it does what it did when I was a teenager, once it gets past my shoulders the exposed blonde will just keep getting lighter and lighter. My hair type responds very well to just plain extra virgin olive oil.
 
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Coconut oil. It will do wonders. You will smell like coconut cookies for a while but your hair feels so good after it!
 
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I'm not really sure about hair care, but as of a few days ago, I just let my hair air-dry after sort of pushing the excess water out of my hair with my fingers. My scalp is always really itchy though T_T It's been that way for a year or two...
 

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Understanding your own hair type is very important as well, rather than to try and fix the problems and the conditions that you have now. It took me a long time to figure out why my Asian friends would prefer to go to an Asian hair dresser, I realised that this was because our hair is fine, thin and long. The treatments need to be specific to that as well ?

So, I try to keep my routine to a simple one now.
1- No more manufactured shampoo with a lot of plastic ingredients. (I used to be a chemist so I started to compare the ingredients list to see what was causing me problems.) So I noticed that even though it felt luxurious to my hand, I realised that this was also causing my hair to go static and then I used to have so much problems controlling them after I brush them. Then I use hair spray. Then I use conditioners to tame it... I was chasing my own tail there. I stopped using those kind of shampoos and gone for more au naturel ones like. Aussies. Aussie Hair Products | Aussie I also use this salon one too when it is on offer. It is less harsh than other commercial ones. TRESemmé I do like and love Pantene, especially when it first came out, but I realised that it is too heavy for my hair. It feels good after I used it, but it weighs it down a lot too. So I stopped using that.

2 - Brushing/products - I do have a tangle tweezer. It gives it a great shine just because I brushed my hair ! XD I also have a metal brush to remove the statistic charges on my hair.

I also went to a great hair dresser who knew my hair type and taught me a thing or two on how to get it looking good. I watched him and I was so surprised. He could and he managed to give it volume, even though it was so thin. So back-combing works well on my hair. But I must keep my hair "light" without dragging it down with products. It just means I need less things used on it, as well as less sprays, or less products overall. So, no strong oil for me, no over-conditioning any more for me either.

3 - Drying - I only hair dry my hair by light blow dry, and I let the rest dry on its own, without damaging and drying my hair too much. I use light products to hold in a style only if I go out, otherwise I let the hair dry on its own.

If your hair is dry, I wondered whether you blow dry it daily. Cos for me, I used to blow dry it daily as well when I was younger, and I used to put a lot of conditioners on it to protect it. I realised now in my older age, the colour of my hair changes to a brown colour than for it to stay black. I'm not sure if the products I used has affected them as well over the years. Plus, somebody mentioned this to me, and I am not sure how true this is. The way the hair is cut will close the ends or not etc. So, can you maybe go for another cut soon? (The other lady who mentioned the technique sounded like she knows a thing or two on the cuticle side of things.)
 

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Understanding your own hair type is very important as well, rather than to try and fix the problems and the conditions that you have now. It took me a long time to figure out why my Asian friends would prefer to go to an Asian hair dresser, I realised that this was because our hair is fine, thin and long. The treatments need to be specific to that as well ?

So, I try to keep my routine to a simple one now.
1- No more manufactured shampoo with a lot of plastic ingredients. (I used to be a chemist so I started to compare the ingredients list to see what was causing me problems.) So I noticed that even though it felt luxurious to my hand, I realised that this was also causing my hair to go static and then I used to have so much problems controlling them after I brush them. Then I use hair spray. Then I use conditioners to tame it... I was chasing my own tail there. I stopped using those kind of shampoos and gone for more au naturel ones like. Aussies. Aussie Hair Products | Aussie I also use this salon one too when it is on offer. It is less harsh than other commercial ones. TRESemmé I do like and love Pantene, especially when it first came out, but I realised that it is too heavy for my hair. It feels good after I used it, but it weighs it down a lot too. So I stopped using that.

2 - Brushing/products - I do have a tangle tweezer. It gives it a great shine just because I brushed my hair ! XD I also have a metal brush to remove the statistic charges on my hair.

I also went to a great hair dresser who knew my hair type and taught me a thing or two on how to get it looking good. I watched him and I was so surprised. He could and he managed to give it volume, even though it was so thin. So back-combing works well on my hair. But I must keep my hair "light" without dragging it down with products. It just means I need less things used on it, as well as less sprays, or less products overall. So, no strong oil for me, no over-conditioning any more for me either.

3 - Drying - I only hair dry my hair by light blow dry, and I let the rest dry on its own, without damaging and drying my hair too much. I use light products to hold in a style only if I go out, otherwise I let the hair dry on its own.

If your hair is dry, I wondered whether you blow dry it daily. Cos for me, I used to blow dry it daily as well when I was younger, and I used to put a lot of conditioners on it to protect it. I realised now in my older age, the colour of my hair changes to a brown colour than for it to stay black. I'm not sure if the products I used has affected them as well over the years. Plus, somebody mentioned this to me, and I am not sure how true this is. The way the hair is cut will close the ends or not etc. So, can you maybe go for another cut soon? (The other lady who mentioned the technique sounded like she knows a thing or two on the cuticle side of things.)
I was born with straight-wavy hair, normal Indian hair. It was also VERY black. Jet black. After a year-long illness (TB) during which my hair fell out in huge amounts, my hair has started growing straighter than ever. And very fine, not thick and wavy like before. It's now fine, thin, straight breakable hair kind of like my east Asian friends, and also a few shades lighter visibly. I don't know why it's changing so much. I loved my long luscious Indian hair and it's too thin for my liking now. I guess it's turning browner because of sun exposure, I don't mind the lightness, but if it were thicker I could do a lot more with it. :(
 
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I was born with straight-wavy hair, normal Indian hair. It was also VERY black. Jet black. After a year-long illness (TB) during which my hair fell out in huge amounts, my hair has started growing straighter than ever. And very fine, not thick and wavy like before. It's now fine, thin, straight breakable hair kind of like my east Asian friends, and also a few shades lighter visibly. I don't know why it's changing so much. I loved my long luscious Indian hair and it's too thin for my liking now. I guess it's turning browner because of sun exposure, I don't mind the lightness, but if it were thicker I could do a lot more with it. :(
I also wondered if I had alopecia as well.. Cos mine is now extra thin too. It also used to be very long and very smooth? I also did not protect it as well when I was younger etc. So I try now to treat it better, and eat better food too. :/

I noticed my body changed when I did hit 30... sniffle. I really did. The hair thing was the same too. :/
 

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I'm not really sure about hair care, but as of a few days ago, I just let my hair air-dry after sort of pushing the excess water out of my hair with my fingers. My scalp is always really itchy though T_T It's been that way for a year or two...
Have you tried mixing tea tree oil with your shampoo and conditioner? If you're using a dandruff style shampoo, that could be contributing to the itchiness as well since those tend to be harsh and drying to the scalp.
 

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I also wondered if I had alopecia as well.. Cos mine is now extra thin too. It also used to be very long and very smooth? I also did not protect it as well when I was younger etc. So I try now to treat it better, and eat better food too. :/

I noticed my body changed when I did hit 30... sniffle. I really did. The hair thing was the same too. :/
When I turned 30, my leg hair thinned and started coming in lighter. The hair on my head hasn't changed though. So weird.
 
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