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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! If I need to put this post in a better spot, please let me know.

I am making robots out of found objects and need a bit of advice from ones 'in the know'.

I bought a dremel tool to cut the metal objects into shapes I want. Ie. Fitting an old brownie camera as a "Head". My question is the best way to attach the parts. For some shapes I can use nuts and bolts or screws. But, for attaching metal to metal would the best thing be a soldering iron.

Like to attach a vintage microphone to an old antique tin? Once I have the pieces cut the way I want, would I solder them together?

If so, any suggestions on learning to do this and the best equipment to buy. If not soldering, what should I use?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Hi! If I need to put this post in a better spot, please let me know.

I am making robots out of found objects and need a bit of advice from ones 'in the know'.

I bought a dremel tool to cut the metal objects into shapes I want. Ie. Fitting an old brownie camera as a "Head". My question is the best way to attach the parts. For some shapes I can use nuts and bolts or screws. But, for attaching metal to metal would the best thing be a soldering iron.

Like to attach a vintage microphone to an old antique tin? Once I have the pieces cut the way I want, would I solder them together?

If so, any suggestions on learning to do this and the best equipment to buy. If not soldering, what should I use?

Thanks in advance!
Sorry I replied to this yesterday but my fucking internet went shite and I couldn't post it. So here's another response.

Basically, you can only solder things if you're happy with a weak link. Solder is for connecting wires to electrical components. It's easily pulled apart.

The alternative would be to weld. But that'll need a welder, and it'll need the metals to be the correct type for welding.

How major is this project? Personally I would prefer to use screws, nuts, bolts, glue and hooks.

Also, this isn't science, it's art!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry I replied to this yesterday but my fucking internet went shite and I couldn't post it. So here's another response.

Basically, you can only solder things if you're happy with a weak link. Solder is for connecting wires to electrical components. It's easily pulled apart.

The alternative would be to weld. But that'll need a welder, and it'll need the metals to be the correct type for welding.

How major is this project? Personally I would prefer to use screws, nuts, bolts, glue and hooks.

Also, this isn't science, it's art!
Thanks for your reply @HAL!

I know...I was conflicted about posting in Science. Just was unsure WHERE to post?!? Figured 'bots' were science & tech -ish and Art can be a 'science' when done properly ;)

Ok, that is very helpful to know re: soldering.

The robot will end up about a 21"l x 16.5" w ending up something like this:

Robot Machine Technology Photography Illustration

The one I am making now will have antique tin for the body and a vintage microphone for a body and then hardware as legs etcetera. So you think glue for affixing the metals will be sufficient?

For the hardware I think screws, nuts bolts will be great as you suggested. The concern for the metal is I don't want whatever I use to show. It needs to be seamless in appearance.
 

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Thanks for your reply @HAL!

I know...I was conflicted about posting in Science. Just was unsure WHERE to post?!? Figured 'bots' were science & tech -ish and Art can be a 'science' when done properly ;)

Ok, that is very helpful to know re: soldering.

The robot will end up about a 21"l x 16.5" w ending up something like this:


The one I am making now will have antique tin for the body and a vintage microphone for a body and then hardware as legs etcetera. So you think glue for affixing the metals will be sufficient?

For the hardware I think screws, nuts bolts will be great as you suggested. The concern for the metal is I don't want whatever I use to show. It needs to be seamless in appearance.
Hmmm 21" is quite high. Solder will almost certainly not hold it. Unless I'm mistaken and there's actually varying strengths of solder? But I don't think so.

It really depends on the weight of the things you want to attach. Only you can be sure of this..! Maybe just test sticking the parts together with glue first (STRONG glue). If it fails, just carefully peel all the glue off and consider something more extreme, either making firm screw/bolt/clip attachments or actually consider welding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Is there going to be any programming involved and if so what will they be programmed to do?
Side note: I love robots
I have a thing for robots too :)

No programming right now as I am still getting used to my tools. But, this is something I would like to pursue in the future, fo shure!
 

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I would agree with the sentiments thus far shared about using epoxy or 'Super Glue' instead of solder in places where you can't attach using screws or bolts.

Solder would not be seamless and you have to know what types of metal you are attaching to each other and adjust the alloy & Flux accordingly. This Chart should give you some indication of the learning-curve needed to solder/Braze effectively:

From Wiki on Soldering:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...g_and_soldering_processes_-_AWS_A3.0_2001.svg

Where possible, bolts are best IMO but using Sheet-Metal Screws might be an option for the Tin-Brownie attachment.
Top Row:

Font Auto part Screw

Dill a hole the diameter of the screw shaft on the outer surface you can easily reach (I'm guessing Tin) and a drill hole about half this diameter, as deep as the screw is long, into the base (Brownie).

Use Phillips or Cross-Head Screws so that you really get a good bite with the driver. Because you are going to need to exert a little force to Plow open the hole in the base to the diameter of the screw. This makes for a very tight and secure bond.

You could then use your epoxy, if you like, to attach some little doodad atop the screw-head to mask it. As this attachment isn't subject to physical stress of supporting the structure.

Best of luck!
& Post a pic when you finish. :)
 
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JB weld is a strong glue for metal to metal (and other materials)
edit: should clarify it's actually an epoxy
I second the JB Weld suggestion. Most hardware stores carry it. Works for all kinds of heavy duty projects.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would agree with the sentiments thus far shared about using epoxy or 'Super Glue' instead of solder in places where you can't attach using screws or bolts.

Solder would not be seamless and you have to know what types of metal you are attaching to each other and adjust the alloy & Flux accordingly. This Chart should give you some indication of the learning-curve needed to solder/Braze effectively:

From Wiki on Soldering:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...g_and_soldering_processes_-_AWS_A3.0_2001.svg

Where possible, bolts are best IMO but using Sheet-Metal Screws might be an option for the Tin-Brownie attachment.
Top Row:

View attachment 305538

Dill a hole the diameter of the screw shaft on the outer surface you can easily reach (I'm guessing Tin) and a drill hole about half this diameter, as deep as the screw is long, into the base (Brownie).

Use Phillips or Cross-Head Screws so that you really get a good bite with the driver. Because you are going to need to exert a little force to Plow open the hole in the base to the diameter of the screw. This makes for a very tight and secure bond.

You could then use your epoxy, if you like, to attach some little doodad atop the screw-head to mask it. As this attachment isn't subject to physical stress of supporting the structure.

Best of luck!
& Post a pic when you finish. :)
A treasure trove of helpful info @VanVinci Thank you! I think those sheet metal screws will be perfect for a few applications. One of the bots will have a body made of tin that can be opened for storage, messages etcetera so they will likely be the perfect size.

You message was enlightening on several areas. One question: Are there actual "doodads" to cover the screws that I can purchase at a hardware store or do I need to manufacture something myself?

A million thanks for your considered and greatly appreciated post.

Thanks also @Ik3 for your vote towards JB Weld. I think it will be perfect and I feel more confident hearing how many of you enjoy using it and that it is good for even HD projects :)
 
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...

You message was enlightening on several areas. One question: Are there actual "doodads" to cover the screws that I can purchase at a hardware store or do I need to manufacture something myself?

...
Well, I'm sure they have plenty of things you could glue on to use to mask the screw heads. It really depends on what you would like the doodad to resemble.

any hardware store will have these copper tube end-caps:

Search Results forÂ*copper pipe, end capÂ*at The Home Depot
Plumbing fitting Metal Copper

Back in 1968, Kubrick's Designers that built the model of the Discovery One spaceship, for the movie 2001, started a trend that Lucas and everyone else since has stolen. They took the 'sheets' of plastic parts for model cars or whatnot and chopped them up in funny ways (even used the connecting frame waste) to make a surface that suggested complex infrastructure of enormous scale:

Spacecraft Space Space station Vehicle Outer space


Room Paper Furniture Table History

So it really just depends on what basic theme you are trying to convey.
Do you have a theme or do you have examples of the 'style' you want to emulate?
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, I'm sure they have plenty of things you could glue on to use to mask the screw heads. It really depends on what you would like the doodad to resemble.

any hardware store will have these copper tube end-caps:

Search Results forÂ*copper pipe, end capÂ*at The Home Depot
View attachment 306090

Back in 1968, Kubrick's Designers that built the model of the Discovery One spaceship, for the movie 2001, started a trend that Lucas and everyone else since has stolen. They took the 'sheets' of plastic parts for model cars or whatnot and chopped them up in funny ways (even used the connecting frame waste) to make a surface that suggested complex infrastructure of enormous scale:

View attachment 306098


View attachment 306106

So it really just depends on what basic theme you are trying to convey.
Do you have a theme or do you have examples of the 'style' you want to emulate?
That expands my mind view of directions I could take. Thanks!

I like the copper ends also and I might be able to age them as well.

The look I am going for is probably best described as Vintage + Industrial.

I will definitely show pics once I have made them and bequeathed them to the gift receivers :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, I'm sure they have plenty of things you could glue on to use to mask the screw heads. It really depends on what you would like the doodad to resemble.

any hardware store will have these copper tube end-caps:

Search Results forÂ*copper pipe, end capÂ*at The Home Depot
View attachment 306090

Back in 1968, Kubrick's Designers that built the model of the Discovery One spaceship, for the movie 2001, started a trend that Lucas and everyone else since has stolen. They took the 'sheets' of plastic parts for model cars or whatnot and chopped them up in funny ways (even used the connecting frame waste) to make a surface that suggested complex infrastructure of enormous scale:

View attachment 306098


View attachment 306106

So it really just depends on what basic theme you are trying to convey.
Do you have a theme or do you have examples of the 'style' you want to emulate?
That expands my mind view of directions I could take. Thanks!

I like the copper ends also and I might be able to age them as well.

The look I am going for is probably best described as Vintage + Industrial.

I will definitely show pics once I have made them and bequeathed them to the gift receivers :)
 

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@HeartCartography I don't know what this robot will be good for, but if it can help me take over the world you got my interest. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
*lurks with interest*

Don't solder metal to metal, really need some sort of epoxy or to be welded.
Welding is beyond my pay grade (skillz) at the present time - though I have friends I could probably ask to join in the project - who weld.

For now, I am going to go with the previous posters suggestion to use the epoxy JB Weld. Will report back how it goes. Thanks for joining the conversation @Loaf :)

(P.S. Lovable+OAF=Loaf Nice!)
 
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