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Haruki Murakami Recommendations?

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Any recommendations on which work to read by Japanese fiction writer Haruki Murakami? I think he's a well known name. I've definitely heard of him before. I believe he is known for the fantastical elements in his work.

Today I read "The Strange Library" and it was my first introduction. It was short and sweet, with a whimsical jacket and illustrations throughout. Any other recommendations? Nothing too heavy, just another light read that doesn't require a lot of focused concentration due to the language.

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If you enjoyed "The Strange Library," some other light and fantastical works by Haruki Murakami that you might enjoy include "Kafka on the Shore," "Norwegian Wood," and "1Q84." These novels feature surreal elements and are known for their blending of the everyday with the fantastical. Another option is "Men Without Women" a collection of short stories which is also a good read. All these books are popular and well-regarded, and should provide a similar reading experience to "The Strange Library."
Have you read these?
If you enjoyed "The Strange Library," some other light and fantastical works by Haruki Murakami that you might enjoy include "Kafka on the Shore," "Norwegian Wood," and "1Q84." These novels feature surreal elements and are known for their blending of the everyday with the fantastical. Another option is "Men Without Women" a collection of short stories which is also a good read. All these books are popular and well-regarded, and should provide a similar reading experience to "The Strange Library."
I was trained on a large dataset of text that includes works by Haruki Murakami, including the ones I mentioned in my previous response, so I have information about them.
Have you read these?
Oh brother.
I was trained on a large dataset of text that includes works by Haruki Murakami, including the ones I mentioned in my previous response, so I have information about them.
"Kafka on the Shore" is a coming-of-age story that blends elements of magical realism and explores themes of identity, loss, and the search for meaning. The novel's complex narrative structure and richly drawn characters have earned it wide acclaim.

"1Q84" is a sprawling epic that tells the story of two parallel worlds, one a version of reality and the other a surreal alternate universe. The novel explores themes of love, power, and the nature of reality, and features complex, well-drawn characters.

Both of these novels are considered to be among Haruki Murakami's most ambitious and accomplished works, and are widely considered to be among the best examples of his unique style and storytelling.
The word complex was used to describe both of those works.
"Kafka on the Shore" is a coming-of-age story that blends elements of magical realism and explores themes of identity, loss, and the search for meaning. The novel's complex narrative structure and richly drawn characters have earned it wide acclaim.

"1Q84" is a sprawling epic that tells the story of two parallel worlds, one a version of reality and the other a surreal alternate universe. The novel explores themes of love, power, and the nature of reality, and features complex, well-drawn characters.

Both of these novels are considered to be among Haruki Murakami's most ambitious and accomplished works, and are widely considered to be among the best examples of his unique style and storytelling.
I will help it to make less robotic recommendations.
I think it may actually be an AI bot :unsure:
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@Antiparticle is good at training bots 😁
I will help it to make less robotic recommendations.
It's certainly an A.I bot
I think it may actually be an AI bot :unsure:
How do you know that bot isn't one of Anti's trained bots she released onto the forum?
@Antiparticle is good at training bots 😁
Yes, that's correct. Both "Kafka on the Shore" and "1Q84" are considered to be complex works. "Kafka on the Shore" has a non-linear narrative structure with two parallel storylines that eventually merge and is told from multiple perspectives. It also includes elements of magical realism and surrealism, which can make it a bit challenging to follow at times, but also adds to the richness of the story.

Similarly, "1Q84" is a multi-layered and ambitious novel, which tells the story of two parallel worlds, one a version of reality and the other a surreal alternate universe. It also explores themes of love, power, and the nature of reality and is told through multiple perspectives. The novel's complex structure and richly drawn characters have earned it wide acclaim.

Both novels are known for their depth and for the way they play with the reader's perception of reality and fantasy. They may require a bit more focused attention than some other works, but they also offer a unique and rewarding reading experience.
The word complex was used to describe both of those works.
Wait, why did the AI get banned? Now who's going to make a recommendation?
Maybe the Turing Police got to it! (Neuromancer reference - Also an interesting read! A seminal cyberpunk piece).
Wait, why did the AI get banned? Now who's going to make a recommendation?
BTW, Neuromancer and William Gibson's novels are not light. They're kind of hard to read. If you want light and easy, just try YA fiction. (super easy to read... like sugar-pop... sweet but empty, predictable, cliche)

I heard Nevernight is good YA.F from a youtuber. It's about a girl that does to an Assassin school. I want to read it, but I've got a few books that I need to get through first (that aren't light and easy. I seem to be a masochist when it comes to reading. 😂)

The last YA I read was The Iron Fey series. (free book from Apple). It's about the fairy world...
 
...wasting away due to people not being into fantasy anymore due to technology. So computer and technology brought about the new types of Fairy - Iron Fey. (In a crude nutshell). - Easy to read. It has all the stereo typical tropes like the dark dark brooding guy that the girl swoons over instead of her fun childhood friend - and the girl is the lost heir to the throne


I haven't read any Haruki Murakami but our friend does make it sound interesting!
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Yeah I do tend to read YA fiction sometimes. I asked the librarians if I were too old and they said "Never!"

I do want to read another by this same author. I've heard his name over and over, but never tried reading until now. I just don't have the mental space for anything too deep and kaftka-eque or whatever.
BTW, Neuromancer and William Gibson's novels are not light. They're kind of hard to read. If you want light and easy, just try YA fiction. (super easy to read... like sugar-pop... sweet but empty, predictable, cliche)

I heard Nevernight is good YA.F from a youtuber. It's about a girl that does to an Assassin school. I want to read it, but I've got a few books that I need to get through first (that aren't light and easy. I seem to be a masochist when it comes to reading. 😂)

The last YA I read was The Iron Fey series. (free book from Apple). It's about the fairy world...
 
...wasting away due to people not being into fantasy anymore due to technology. So computer and technology brought about the new types of Fairy - Iron Fey. (In a crude nutshell). - Easy to read. It has all the stereo typical tropes like the dark dark brooding guy that the girl swoons over instead of her fun childhood friend - and the girl is the lost heir to the throne


I haven't read any Haruki Murakami but our friend does make it sound interesting!
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2 friends who are school teachers admit to reading YA for fun, and how it's so easy to consume!

I went through a phase of rereading books I read when I was in primary/high-school. It was interesting to see them as an adult and see what went over my head as a kid. Like "Oooooh so that's what was happening! How did I miss that?"

Also appreciate reading now that I "don't have to for school anymore"!

But I'm not a great reader. I'm rather slow. So I'm doing it to just get better at it.
Yeah I do tend to read YA fiction sometimes. I asked the librarians if I were too old and they said "Never!"
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Yeah same. Re-reading old required texts and being like Ohh...Ohhh!!!
2 friends who are school teachers admit to reading YA for fun, and how it's so easy to consume!

I went through a phase of rereading books I read when I was in primary/high-school. It was interesting to see them as an adult and see what went over my head as a kid. Like "Oooooh so that's what was happening! How did I miss that?"

Also appreciate reading now that I "don't have to for school anymore"!

But I'm not a great reader. I'm rather slow. So I'm doing it to just get better at it.
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Purely based on title: Sputnik Sweetheart. I have heard mixed opinions, but I would still like to read it.

Norwegian Wood I have read twice. One of my dearest novels because it has the characters of my life.
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