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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone. I'm new to the forum, but not to M-B personality tests.
I was previously classed as an ENTJ and it never quite felt accurate. 4 years of engineering coursework later (I passed it all eventually) and I wound up taking another MB type test, after transferring to a 4-year university from a JC. This time it came up ENTP.

First of all WHOA. The things written here(can't post the url, but it's on this site +entp-articles/741-entp-personality +. +html) are downright astonishing.

It was like somebody was in my head, listening to my every thought and there were a number of things described that I know I do, but don't want to admit to myself, and others that I hadn't quite put into words.


Anyway, all that aside, I think the ENTP profile is accurate for me, and my Enneagram (Have to look into that) seems accurate as well. My enneagram is type 2w3, 6w7, 8w7.

The bottom line is that I've been in school forever and have some sweet assistance and don't want to squander it on something I'm not cut out for. I've been in college since age 17 after Honors in high school conflicted with family drama (parent w/a terminal disease) and I took an early exit. I have 135 some odd units w/a 3.10GPA, 3 AA degrees in Liberal Arts with different fields of study, and boy am I getting tired of trying to feed myself after 7 years of self-inflicted poverty :p So I'm trying to decide on a major that won't take forever, that I can finish soon, and that maybe I could even enjoy the whole time I'm studying it. ;)

I literally cut the pages of the majors that interest me out of my school catalog last night. I like the town, I'm tired of moving, and I don't plan to transfer to another college to earn my Bachelor's. In other words, these are the options that I'm letting myself choose, and I realize I could move or transfer, but don't want that brought into this discussion (please? :]).

It's down to 5-ish fields.
The field that stands out as most interesting to me for now is Economics: Analytical Tools and Methods. It's basically an Econ degree with an applied math minor. I have 5 of 8 classes for the math minor finished already, thanks to 4 years of engineering coursework :tongue: I loved the calculus courses. The only thing left to stand in my way is Linear Algebra, which I've heard is a nightmare. Then I need Stats (cake) and Intro to Math Modeling(no expectations) and 1 other 5-unit upper division math course.
The Econ itself appeals to me because it is political, gives me an opportunity to create real change, models real world situations, requires analysis of data and critical thinking, is flexible as all get-out, and hey - I like to have input on big decisions.

The other things that interest me are: Physics, Journalism/Broadcasting, International Studies (with a Chinese or Postcolonial African focus), or a self-designed option in Econ. (I also have 8 Minors that interest me)

So - I'm not asking you to decide for me, but are there tools you other ENTPs use that you could share with me?

Or, at the worst, we can wind up chewing the fat about some interesting and nifty things. Or ways to overcome less than helpful tendencies - like being possessed to pursue an idea to its ends and staying up way later than is convenient. Or overanalyzing things to the point that the analysis loses meaning. The second one could easily be boredom, but maybe I'm not the only one who does that.

And on that note... Adieu! (Oh, and I speak pretty fluent spanish, decent ASL, and a smidge of French. So far....)
~Will
 

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tldr. do chemical engineering. you'll be busy, engaged, and rich one day. Who knows if you'll be satisfied, you can at least tell everyone you got through the toughest major in the united states which gives you the right to do anything you want ever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This isn't Twitter. It was as long as necessary. And I like smilies, but thanks for the uninvited advice to be less expressive :p

seriously, why did you reply if you didn't read it?

I was a Mechanical Engineering major for a long time and felt like I was losing my humanity to it. It was too methodical and I couldn't use my intuition in the coursework.
This Econ degree takes most of the same math as an ME degree.
 
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sounds like you got lazy, you get to design all sorts of shit in ME. Econ is cool though, hope you have a job lined up for after you graduate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sort of. I was actually really motivated until I got a wake-up call and wound up doing a lot of soul-searching. I decided I like having a life outside of work and ME wouldn't really let me have one outside of work.
I'd rather have life be interesting than successful - though I do like food, shelter, and all that. I'd much rather work to live than live to work and I wanted to get off that path.
 

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Wow all the tl;dr's in here are obnoxious. Why bother posting if you have nothing intelligent to say except to criticize the fact that the OP can write a paragraph? I swear, twitter and FB are going to cripple the literacy of this generation if they haven't already.

@William I am it really depends on what you expect to do and like to do. I've heard that ENTP's can be great entrepreneurs, which is something you could do with econ. Math, well, accounting. But accounting could be a nightmare for an ENTP because its boring. So thats another thing to keep in mind, pick something you're least likely to get bored with. Journalism doesn't pay all that well that I know of, and international studies can pay well if you're going to translate, plus you get to travel. Honestly though, it sounds like you really like econ and have thought about that one more.

Personally, I'm a biology major. I'm 3 classes away from graduating with my BS, and am hoping to start the masters program January of 2012. I like the way science is constantly changing, and if your hypothesis is wrong, then all the work wasn't for naught because you still learn from it, and its a step towards figuring out whats really going on. There's plenty of room for my Ne to work when it comes to design, and my Ti loves setting up experiments and figuring out all the variables. There is a bit of grunt work, but thats what research assistants are for xD I really don't mind it too much because I know I'm working to figure something out. Its not just a bunch of pointless repetition, there's a bigger picture involved. And I'm getting into field research, which could involve some degree of travel.

I think most importantly for ENTP's, its just to pick something you won't get bored with. Something stimulating enough to hold your interest with issues and problems that will change and keep presenting you with new challenges. And honestly, I sort of like encountering problems that keep me up waaay too late :crazy: But thats all self discipline. Decide upon a bedtime, and when its bed time, GO TO BED. I've always had issues sleeping anyway because my mind doesn't shut up, but one thing I find that helps is to going to bed about an hour before I want to go to sleep. I'll have a nightlight on and I'll just read, or post on PerC with the computer screen dimmed. I think the lower light levels help to convince my brain its time to sleep since bright artificial light can mess up your natural sleep/wake cycle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Haha, glad someone else appeared that found the tldrs as insulting and unhelpful as I did.

Bio... I liked bio. Did really well in the IB honors bio in high school. Being and EMT or RN or LVN or something sounds appealing, but I'm almost burned out on school, and trying to get something tangible (to show other people) out of it before I need to ease off on the school for a while.
I loved performing the experiments in Chem, Physics, and Bio. It was always new. I thought about research fields, especially biopsych. I think I always felt like my chemistry skills were weak. Chem2 (reaction rates, qualitative analysis, etc.) was tough.
Field research and working with my hands and involving my body in my work has always appealed to me. I can only feel so connected to a problem on a page or computer screen.

I agree, Accounting sounds pretty meh to me. I think that I've thought the most about Econ, and probably because it appeals to me the most, at least superficially. I will probably have to take the plunge, go for it, and invest a semester in order to decide whether or not to commit to it.

I was originally interested in ME for several reasons, but prototyping sounded *fantastic* to me. It came down to feeling like I had to give up my humanity to get through the ME courses, and it stopped seeming worth it. The whole time I was doing it, the fact that I didn't want to pay attention to the last 5% of any given problem - the details that I would want someone else to take care of - nagged at me and made it feel like a poor fit for me.


Agreed on the GO TO BED idea. Everything will still be here in the morning. Everything.
I haven't had much trouble sleeping recently, but I have had intermittent issues with it. Bright lights definitely have effects on circadian rhythms. My mom mentioned reading an article about bright enough lights completely stopping production of melatonin. I used to use super-bright lighting to help me pull all-nighters (never again... for school anyway :D) I now turn off all the lights in my 1-bed apartment except for my dim bedside lamp about an hour before I get in bed. It helps a lot.
I definitely feel better going to sleep when I feel like I did something significant on any given day and have something significant to look forward to doing the next day.

When you chose Bio, how did you decide? Was it a pattern that emerged and you followed, or a choice you researched closely before choosing? Or maybe it was always obvious? Or something I haven't mentioned?

Cheers and goodnight
 

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No you don't NEED to finish a major. I came to this conclusion after I recently finished my engineering degree. I could have spent those five years more productively by generating income as opposed to losing money. Knowledge only goes as far as the application.

Choose something you like and dive in, but make sure you have an escape route in case you get bored. But there is no point in just waiting around trying to "make a decision", because you're most likely not going to reach a conclusion and you'll just be bored and feeling like a bum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is the last place I expected to find Trolls. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Cheers to that, Businessman. Thanks for the legitimate post.
On Monday, I'm sitting down with an advisor to do the math on how much time it will take to complete. Linear Algebra is going to be interesting, but everything else sounds pretty do-able.

That's what I decided when I stopped pursuing engineering. I realized that I could finish, but that I didn't want to. I was pulling a Raskolnikof - "Can I?" instead of "Should I?"

I have IT experience for an escape route, but ugh I hate the way techs get blamed for everything. That's just at the entry level though.
 

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Haha, glad someone else appeared that found the tldrs as insulting and unhelpful as I did.

Bio... I liked bio. Did really well in the IB honors bio in high school. Being and EMT or RN or LVN or something sounds appealing, but I'm almost burned out on school, and trying to get something tangible (to show other people) out of it before I need to ease off on the school for a while.
I loved performing the experiments in Chem, Physics, and Bio. It was always new. I thought about research fields, especially biopsych. I think I always felt like my chemistry skills were weak. Chem2 (reaction rates, qualitative analysis, etc.) was tough.
Field research and working with my hands and involving my body in my work has always appealed to me. I can only feel so connected to a problem on a page or computer screen.

I agree, Accounting sounds pretty meh to me. I think that I've thought the most about Econ, and probably because it appeals to me the most, at least superficially. I will probably have to take the plunge, go for it, and invest a semester in order to decide whether or not to commit to it.

I was originally interested in ME for several reasons, but prototyping sounded *fantastic* to me. It came down to feeling like I had to give up my humanity to get through the ME courses, and it stopped seeming worth it. The whole time I was doing it, the fact that I didn't want to pay attention to the last 5% of any given problem - the details that I would want someone else to take care of - nagged at me and made it feel like a poor fit for me.


Agreed on the GO TO BED idea. Everything will still be here in the morning. Everything.
I haven't had much trouble sleeping recently, but I have had intermittent issues with it. Bright lights definitely have effects on circadian rhythms. My mom mentioned reading an article about bright enough lights completely stopping production of melatonin. I used to use super-bright lighting to help me pull all-nighters (never again... for school anyway :D) I now turn off all the lights in my 1-bed apartment except for my dim bedside lamp about an hour before I get in bed. It helps a lot.
I definitely feel better going to sleep when I feel like I did something significant on any given day and have something significant to look forward to doing the next day.

When you chose Bio, how did you decide? Was it a pattern that emerged and you followed, or a choice you researched closely before choosing? Or maybe it was always obvious? Or something I haven't mentioned?

Cheers and goodnight
I think a lot of it does have to do with self discipline. If you know the general kind of career you want and what it entails, and its what you like, then you have to have the self discipline to get the degree, despite classes that may suck the life out of you. Its all temporary anyway. My chemistry skills aren't that great either, but I had to suck it up and tough out 3 chemistry courses, 2 of them before I could even start taking biology.

As for how I decided on biology, it's just always been obvious. I've always loved nature and when I was a kid, my days were spent outside observing spiders eat lol . I took a real biology class my junior year of high school, I was 16, and thats pretty much when I decided biology was what I was going to study. I started college with my major declared as biology and have never changed it once.
 

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Wow, someone comes on fresh to the site and you guys bombard him with "tldr" like a bunch of 12 year old jackasses? Is this really what we want to be known for?

@William I am I'm in a pretty similar boat right now. I started community college at 15 because high school was seriously killing me. I was on the dean's list for 2 years pursuing an AA in Visual Arts and Communications before I had to get a medical withdrawal. I took six months off, recovered my health, and was about to re-enroll when I realized something terrible: I don't want to finish my degree. I had this great plan for it too, was going to transfer to a great local school and get a Masters. But suddenly I realized that as much as I love learning about graphics, I don't actually want to do this for the rest of my life.

So now I'm planning on taking a bunch of classes at the community college in different fields. I also thought economics sounded interesting, and a friend of mine suggested data analysis. I'm also going to look into advertising, which I find fascinating and which correlates well with the visual arts background. For me, it comes down to this: I need something that challenges me, something that completely involves me, something that inspires me and something that will allow me to use my intuiting abilities. Don't settle for just a job when you can look for a rewarding career.
 

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So now I'm planning on taking a bunch of classes at the community college in different fields.
This is what I did and even though I'm just now finally working on my BS (at 27 =\) it is actually towards something I don't see myself getting bored with. On the bright side all that CC got me an AA and AS and a Webmaster's Certificate =]

If you're unsure what you want to do and can deal with dabbling a bit more in CC then it might be worth your while. You do seem pretty sure about econ, though, so maybe that is what is calling to you, and you're just apprehensive that you're going to make the wrong decision. I've dealt with that shit too often... and even though nearly all of my decisions turn out to be the best for me, I still become nervous and worried that I'm making a poor decision. Don't get me wrong, this is only with the big decisions where it effects my education or costs a lot of money (or some combination thereof lol).

I'm not sure if it's possible (are you strictly in upper-division/major-specific courses?), but maybe you can at least choose some classes that will go towards multiple degrees, and then that way you will have more flexibility if you realize you REALLY don't like what you chose.

Good luck and trust your gut feeling!
 
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Well my advice is to go you a Uni that lets you do 2/3 subjects in first and second year before settling yourself on a major. That's what I did studied Maths (my original Major) with Computer science and psychology and decided Computer Science was my passion after first semester!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
@hziegel - That sounds cool! That's actually exactly what I was doing, and I was happy learning multiple subjects at once. I usually took 4 classes at a time, and 2 would be from the same field. Somehow it all worked out and I finished all of my GE with only 1 or 2 extra classes. Then I took an MBTI test, found out my (mis)type, and used the Strong Interest test to tell myself Engineering would be a good idea. The flexibility appealed to me, but in the end I decided it's not my thing. I don't want to be in something that.... thought out. It's too sensory for me and doesn't let me use my intuition. It does let me be creative.
But anyway, I had a point. I took all those courses, plus most of 58 units of engineering pre-req's, and wound up with 3 AA Liberal Arts degrees in 3 fields. I wish I hadn't decided so definitely on something and made myself stick to it. I should have listened to my gut.
And thanks for the defense. I figured the more worthwhile people would come out eventually, so I just waited the less helpful people out.

@possiBri I think what really calls to me about Econ is that it might actually change the world. I wouldn't be happy with sitting on a news show and talking about what the Dow Jones is doing, but I would be happy in some type of position where I could wield power and influence the future for the better. I guess I should find out if Econ majors ever get to do that.
You're a 7w6? I'm a 6w7. I also doubt my major decisions, but less at times and more at others. I couldn't name the pattern for when it's better or worse right now, but maybe it's related.

I am all but 3 upper-division GE classes from being full-time major-only classes. I have 135 units haha :D
 
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@William I am , I actually have a good deal of experience with economics and the courseload in general, so if you have any specific questions you want answered, I might be able to help a bit. It's worth keeping in mind that in some countries, such as my own, Canada, they prefer that their economists have a masters if you plan to do economics itself professionally. In addition, linear algebra is a lot easier than people think, especially for those like yourself and myself who have gone through engineering (you) or the sciences (me). It's very much like calculus -- most of the actual math is just addition, subtraction, division and multiplication in some form, the rest is knowing the correct forms. Statistics is likewise fairly easy, although you may stumble a bit with econometrics, since it can get a little abstract if you take advanced versions of it.

Since you want to use an economics degree to try and sway people's opinions, you'll probably need to grab an Masters (although I may be wrong, I would take the time to check out the career prospects and what is typically required in your nation). I know in the States, for example, they are not as stringent on the accreditations of their economists as they are up here. However, having a strong math and stats backbone is incredibly important as well, and will be a massive boon to have on your side to graduate with it, putting you well ahead of any economics major who chose not to do it.

Otherwise, economics as a supporting degree, or Maths as a supporting degree, is a great thing to have because economics is so heavily dependant on logic, and logical systems thereof. Often times, you can even get some certificates along with an economics degree, although I am not sure whether or not that is offerred at your university.

I know this though, you can do a lot with an economics degree. The Math and Stats you know alone are worth something, but economics is an incredibly broad and comprehensive topic which has tendrils in many, many fields. I've read everything from topics on gateway theories, immigration patterns, health care, and even stuff on sports in economics journals.

While I am not an ENTP, I do know I am not exactly strongly situated in my section and have, too, been categorized as an ENTJ (most times I take the test now, when I am more rough on myself in my opinion, I end up as an INTJ). My twin actually has credentials in journalism, but ended up moving on to a more intensive program in Visual Design later on, and I also have a background in the biological sciences. I might be able to answer questions on those as well!

Hope I helped somewhere here!

Also, I agree with folks like @hziegel and @WildWinds. If you don't want to read it, don't read it. Those of us who do respond don't need to know that you didn't read it, and are generally uninteresting in you announcing it so. It does nothing more than cause hard feelings, and that helps no one here.
 
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