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I got fired from my last job as a receptionist at a small IT solutions company and I'm not sure of the reason why. This happened about 8 months ago and I'm still rolling it around in my head and it is now almost a constant ache. My suspicion is that I just wasn't cut out to be a receptionist, which is not the best job for an INFP who would rather avoid answering phones all together, and I just wasn't improving as fast as they wanted me to. Not knowing for sure though has made it so I can't get it out of my mind. I just keep revisiting certain instances that may have contributed to me getting fired (this has done wonders for my self-esteem HAHA). By the way, I did ask my former boss why she was firing me but she refused to answer.

I have since started working at my parents business doing menial things way below my skill level just so I have something to do and make a little money. Not even sure if you would call it a part time job. I have also been half-heartedly looking for employment elsewhere but my sorely bruised self-confidence is getting in the way big time. If I ever do get an interview somewhere how would I even answer the dreaded question of "Why did you leave your last job?" How do I answer this question honestly without it making me look bad?

Another thing you should know is that I was under the impression that I would also be doing some web/graphic design work, which is the whole reason why I took the job in the first place so I could get some experience in that area. That didn't end up happening. Actually, I was on the verge of quitting anyway because I wasn't getting what I wanted out of it, but I wanted to find other employment first.

So my questions to you are:
1. How would I answer the question, "Why did you leave your last job?", when I don't even know why they fired me?
2. Do you have any mind hack tips to regain confidence?
3. Do you have any other advice for someone in this situation?
 

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1. Do you live in a "right to work" state? You probably do, and since you are just a human being, the company has the right to fire you for no reason. I would state the truth, and say it must have been a personality conflict. If they have no documented reason to let you go it is probably some immature and petty reason anyway; employee/employer incompatibility is the top reason for people quitting/getting fired.

2. Just remember that 95% of people are capable of doing 95% of jobs out there. Very few people are special, one way or the other. You can learn to do just about anything.

3. There are lots of general/clerical jobs out there. Even working a temporary job can give you the experience needed and a good reference to get a better job.
 
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1. Do you live in a "right to work" state? You probably do, and since you are just a human being, the company has the right to fire you for no reason. I would state the truth, and say it must have been a personality conflict. If they have no documented reason to let you go it is probably some immature and petty reason anyway; employee/employer incompatibility is the top reason for people quitting/getting fired.

2. Just remember that 95% of people are capable of doing 95% of jobs out there. Very few people are special, one way or the other. You can learn to do just about anything.

3. There are lots of general/clerical jobs out there. Even working a temporary job can give you the experience needed and a good reference to get a better job.

@Tangled Kite As a plus to 1., besides peronality incompatibility, you could even turn it into your advantage by showing your new employer how ambitious you were, but this drive of yours wasn't recognized or utilized by your previous boss. Honesty is best, if you seem like you're trying to sneak something under the interviewer's nose they're not going to think very highly of you.

2. This, but in your mind:



3. A boss firing an employee without clear reason is like when someone breaks up with you; you're not the problem if you tried to make it work, it's more likely some problem with them. You're amazing and don't doubt it.
 

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I got fired from my last job as a receptionist at a small IT solutions company and I'm not sure of the reason why.

Actually, I was on the verge of quitting anyway because I wasn't getting what I wanted out of it, but I wanted to find other employment first.

So my questions to you are:
1. How would I answer the question, "Why did you leave your last job?", when I don't even know why they fired me?
2. Do you have any mind hack tips to regain confidence?
3. Do you have any other advice for someone in this situation?
I'll answer the first two statements you made here. If your hearts not in a job you'll tend to subconsciously suck at it to the point of getting fired. Was being fired a shock, or somewhat of a relief? I have my suspicions it was the latter given your second statement. But also reception work is a multi-tasking thing that requires a lot of in the moment attention, yeah you're right, possibly not the best choice for an intuiter. I've done jobs like that in the past and I was just never very good at them, adequate? Yes. Good? Not at all. Chalk it up to yet another lesson in what you don't want rather than a serious blight on your sense of self worth. Actually even just admitting to yourself that you sabotaged it, will probably be enough to get closure here. Being powerful in your own experience rather than powerless, is always a better self-esteem position even when we've done something a bit iffy.

Now, your three questions.

1. Why did you leave you last job? It was a mutual agreement in which I realised that multi-tasking, dealing with in the moment interruptions etc just aren't my strong points. I found it would be worthwhile to find a position that more closely matches my skills and talents where I could perform at a higher level. Or, you could say you were let go but also follow that up with....this is what I learned from that experience, and this is why I believe your position will not be in issue for me. Having a negative in your work history isn't bad as long as you can spin the positives off it. Employers want to know that you being fired wasn't a result of a poor work ethic or attitude or you defrauding the company or similar. If you can demonstrate that you understood the reason's for it, don't really disagree with those reasons and that what you are doing now demonstrates a departure from that mistake then they'll be a lot more understanding of it.

2. Yes. See my initial response. Admit to yourself that you weren't happy there, probably failed on purpose because you couldn't pull the trigger on the job yourself and therefore essentially left the job you'll feel a whole lot better about it. It's not about you being victimised, it's about your taking responsibility for your actions, realising a mistake and picking yourself back up. That kind of thing builds rather than destroys confidence. I've been fired twice btw....just do you know I'm not talking out my arse.

3. Yes. Get back on the horse as soon as possible. The longer you mope around in dead end work the less likely it is you'll overcome this setback. Also use that bad work experience to catalogue what sucked about that job, both you doing it and disliking it. Those are important things to avoid in the next job if you don't want to make a career out of being fired.
 
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