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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good Morning everyone...This is my first post...I was unaware that there were forums for discussing personality types, I don't know why...there's a forum for everything else on the net. I began researching personality types maybe a little under a year ago. I'm an ISTP...This particular classification fits me to the "T".

Here's a little bit about me. I'm a 26 year old college grad. I tend to be pretty Easy Going, Introverted for the most part, but I will open up on occasion, and can even be the center of attention depending on the discussion or activity.

I'm very athletic, outdoorsy, and I love physical activity. I tend to be covertly vulgar, sarcastic, and uncaring about a lot of issues, even though I don't appear to be when people first meet me. I'm knowledgeable, about a lot of issues, but only to the point that I myself need to be. I like to tell people, I can talk to anyone about anything...for about 15 minutes. LOL!

I'm pretty passive with most issues, I allow a lot of things to be as they are...but turn extremely hostile, when my space, values, or compentency are put in to question. Anyway, you guys know the rest or you obviously wouldn't be here.

Anyway, I recently became a supervisor for a warehouse job. I by no means run the place, I just have a small portion of the warehouse that I run and have a few people under me. I had jobs where I had to delegate work before, but I never was officially a supervisor or manager.

I tend to be pretty passive in the way that I operate, I trust my employees to do their job, for the most part...and will only offer suggestions or interfere when I think something can be done better or if I need to discipline someone. I'm not a disciplinarian by nature, so that will be somewhat difficult for me. At times, I have a hard time putting my foot down, and when I do it often times is well past when that particular person has crossed the line. And in turn...sometimes this brings out an extremely rash outburst to that said person. I don't want bring that style of dealing with people in my personal affairs to my job.

I wanted to know if anyone else on this board has suggestions for how or what type of supervisor my personality type needs to be to be successful at this job.

To add another dimension to my situation, I used to work amongst some of these employees.

Thanx in advance for any advice you guys may give me.
 

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If you're anything like me, your biggest difficulties probably lie in communication. Many people like to run through the overall plan or goal before they actually take action. As ISTP's we often don't plan very much, so its important to voice this. It can be remedied by something as simple as, "I plan to do my work as expected until I encounter an obstacle." Saying things like this will ultimately change peoples' entire mindsets. Long term planner types will understand that they must put themselves into "adapt" mode, and will not be as stressed out when things don't go as planned. Demand that your people ask for clarification when they don't understand something you say, and make sure you're always understood by saying things like, "am I making myself clear?" and "does that make sense?"

Otherwise, I'd say do what comes natural. Be friendly, be yourself. ISTP's aren't very personal, so we don't have to worry as much about looking "professional," and controlling our relationships with the people below us. Support the decisions of the people above you, don't add to the cynnicism of the people below you, just shut your mouth even if you agree with what they are saying. Do whatever you can to support those above you without lying. The second you're caught lying, people will stop trusting you.

Energy in = energy out. Get face time and never say, "the boss wants you guys to clean the shed." The second you do that is the second you become the middle man and they stop listening to what you actually have to say. Also, if you think someone's idea is incredibly dumb, before you entirely shun them say, "Explain how that makes sense to you."

That's all I got, hope it helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do have a tendecy to think people understand me or my plans, so a lot of things go unsaid, on my part...and as I get older I'm realizing that's the case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
LOL, I knew that would come up. Its actually a play on my name. Bob Dylan has a cover of the song too if I'm not mistaken, but I was actually aware of the movie long before I ever heard the song.
 

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LOL, I knew that would come up. Its actually a play on my name. Bob Dylan has a cover of the song too if I'm not mistaken, but I was actually aware of the movie long before I ever heard the song.
Welcome to the club.

"Quinn the Eskimo (Mighty Quinn)" is a 1967 folk-rock song written by Bob Dylan during The Basement Tapes sessions. The song became a hit in 1968 for the British band Manfred Mann, who released it as a single using the title "Mighty Quinn".
The subject of the song is the arrival of the mighty Quinn (an Eskimo), who changes despair into joy and chaos into rest, and attracts attention from the animals. The metaphorical lyrics have prompted suggestions that Quinn is a village elder. Dylan himself has said that the title character refers to actor Anthony Quinn's role as an Eskimo in the 1959 movie The Savage Innocents. Dylan has also been quoted as saying that the song was nothing more than a "simple nursery rhyme".

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mighty_Quinn_(song)
 

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Hey Quyn, good to "meet" you :)

I was the warehouse manager for a public housing agency's maintenance/construction department ages ago. It was one hat I wore, so it wasn't my fulltime position - I delegated to a staffer who had worked in the warehouse for decades. I had structured the department so that I was only necessary for emergencies and problem solving, but not the day to day activities, because I assumed the employees would be able to manage those on their own.

I was a terrible supervisor. I didn't communicate with my staff often enough, and they sort of saw me as a snob - you know, too good to hang with the scum in the warehouse. SO not true - I would have far preferred being in the warehouse throwing stock than sitting at a desk working on budgets and correspondence. But because I wasn't big on daily communication, petting my staff with compliments and atta boys, and stepping in every day or so to see how things were running (if there's no emergency, things are running fine - right?), they became disgruntled with me.

If I had it to do over, I would have spent a LOT more time in the warehouse doing the dirty work with the staff (and delegated my office work, or taken it home with me), and I would have forced myself to be more complimentary and hands-on with the day to day activities. I personally do not work well with that type of supervisor - I want to be left alone, I'll let you know if I need direction or help - but it turns out most people crave more interaction with their direct managers, and they need to know that they're doing a good job - despite all the evidence in the world that they're not fucking up, they need to hear it. Weird, but true.

So, the hardest part of this would be to remember to tell your employees that they're doing well, even when it's obvious that they are. It seems such a waste of energy - but it goes a long way. The other hard part is to nip problems in the bud, before they become unmanageable or lead to angry outbursts. One of my employees lunged at me across my desk because of a misunderstanding that stemmed originally from my lack of communication. Had I been more proactive and less passive about communicating the POSITIVE parts of their jobs, that altercation never would have happened.

Good luck... I don't know if any of the above was at all helpful, but I feel ya.

Edited to add: DJ has some good advice up there, especially about not being the "middle man" between your staff and upper management.
 

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I can identify with what you're saying. I supervise a group of about 12 employees. Over time people become lax in their responsibilities. - or some people are just plain idiots. For me, its about getting out of my comfort zone have having a short weekly or bi-weekly meeting to discuss areas of progress or where the ball has been dropped. It doesn't come naturally to me as I too expect people to know their job and perform it. Its just a necessary evil that I must do. I tell myself, hey this is going to last 10-15 minutes, lets go get it over with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have 6...their not the brightest bunch, and three of them are new...but I don't think I have a bad group. Only been in this particular department for a month, so who knows...They do their work, but they don't like to take direction too much. Should be interesting...my biggest problem I think is gonna be addressing problems upfront and head on...I'm just gonna have to grit my teeth and do it I suppose.
 

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they dont like to take direction much? Your saying they dont follow what you tell them to do and do it how they feel like it should be done?
That rather sounds they have little respect for you and are doing things the way they like it. I would of stamped down my foot long ago. Do you try to be extra friendly with them still, since you used to work with them?
They may look at you as their old buddy and get away with murder. That will just end up bad.
How good of a leader do you think you are btw? (no offense meant). I mean, do you know how to motivate them to work on things they find boring or do you take a very laid back stance and hope they will finish what they are doing in time and correctly?

Ive found that the most important part of being in charge is to have very high self confidence, never lie and stand your ground on issues. But not stubbornly, if they can provide a good enough reason why to do it different or not at all, consider it. If it sounds valid/solid and doesnt conflict with any order from upstairs then it might be applicable. If you let them walk over you, you might aswell just hand in the resignation the same day. They may be your friends but on the clock, you have to treat them as your subordinates. Once the days over, hit em up in the pub if you like.

Also, as chia said. Even though it is obvious that they are doing a good job. A positive word atleast once a week is a must. It shows you care what they are doing and pats their ego a bit. Also, it depends if you want to be hands on or not. If you pop in once in a while to help its ok, but if you end up doing their job for them instead, then its not. Most are so lazy they will try to find some other sucker to do the job for them instead.
 
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I work in a department store at night just to help ends meet. I work in the front end and I am a subordinate. Although I am not the manager, these are the things I think a manager should be and also where I see supervisors go wrong.

Being too friendly. I am friends with one of the supervisors but when we are on the clock she is my boss and I am the employee. I do not ask her to break the rules for me, and I also do not put her in a compromising position where she has to choose. BUT there are those that will cozy up to you just for that purpose. I see it happen all the time. Then if you allow this angle to work you will be despised by the employees that actually do their work. Reward your top performers and reprimand your bottom performers. If you allow your bottom performers to get away with murder all because you do not want to speak up you run the risk pissing off your good workers. Then all sorts of bad things can come out of that.

Don't be a pushover. There are a lot of people who have a horrible work ethic and if they can get away with it they will. They will back you right up into a corner with their worthlessness and when you ask them to get busy, they give you an incredulous look like why are you asking me to do some work. They get all pissed off and it gets out of hand. Just stop it before it starts by being firm.

Lead by example. Do the things you expect your employees to do. Nothing is worse than someone trying to enforce rules that they themselves do not follow.

Get on the same page. Gather everyone up and let them know where you stand, what your rules are, what's expected, etc. I hate it when people tell me what to do and for that very reason I go over and beyond what is expected of me. Others aren't like that unfortunately. There are some people that aren't autonomous and you will have to direct them every step of the way. It sucks (especially as an ISTP I just think I shouldn't have to tell you every single thing) but it has to be done sometimes.

I honestly think if you be the supervisor you would like to have, you'll be just fine. Just speak up and don't hold anything in. Things fester that way.
 

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I tend to be pretty passive in the way that I operate, I trust my employees to do their job, for the most part...and will only offer suggestions or interfere when I think something can be done better or if I need to discipline someone. I'm not a disciplinarian by nature, so that will be somewhat difficult for me. At times, I have a hard time putting my foot down, and when I do it often times is well past when that particular person has crossed the line. And in turn...sometimes this brings out an extremely rash outburst to that said person. I don't want bring that style of dealing with people in my personal affairs to my job.
I think it's important to know that ISTP types will usually want their direct reports to feel their contributions matter so will supervise or lead in an egalitarian manner where everyone is equal even the supervisor ISTP. You seem to have a good grasp of your strengths and weaknesses in how you handle folks, and you're starting off in a good direction by coming up through the ranks. I don't think you will ever ask an employee to do something that you have not done yourself or willing to roll up your sleeves and do, so they will always respect you for that.

I think the only problem you may encounter are the occasional personal matters being brought into the workplace. Since we're pragmatic types, you should be able to handle these matters as well. Being someone who handles HR policy matters myself, I would encourage you to befriend someone in your HR department to intercede when there is a policy issue that may be time consuming and although you may objectively understand a situation where you allow an employee to slide, always be careful of setting precedents. Welcome to the forum and congrats on your recent promotion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think I chose my words poorly. I didn't mean to say they don't like to take direction...but half of my employees, I only have 6 have been there for awhile. They know the job more or less. I just wanted some ground rules on how to deal with problems when they arise, and at my job that is a given; be it laziness, theft, calling out, personal issues.

As ISTPs we don't like to micromanage or be micromanaged...so in that regard, I have a tendency to let some issues slide, because I like to believe most issues can work theirselves out...but as a manager you can't do that obviously. I'm gonna have to come out of my shell I see, and address problems immediately, before they fester. Knowing myself, I have this problem in my personal life, and it causes me to irrationally blow up at people sometimes.

I like the bit about befriending someone in HR, I may just do that. I'm the type who likes quality and constructive feedback...as someone else said, I am going to have to give positive feedback periodically. I just don't want to sound like I'm doing it for the sake of doing it.

Thanx all, I will take in all these suggestions. I gotta feeling I'm gonna have a problem with one of my new hires however...he already doesn't look like he wants to be here, lol!
 

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I work in a department store at night just to help ends meet. I work in the front end and I am a subordinate. Although I am not the manager, these are the things I think a manager should be and also where I see supervisors go wrong.

Being too friendly. I am friends with one of the supervisors but when we are on the clock she is my boss and I am the employee. I do not ask her to break the rules for me, and I also do not put her in a compromising position where she has to choose. BUT there are those that will cozy up to you just for that purpose. I see it happen all the time. Then if you allow this angle to work you will be despised by the employees that actually do their work. Reward your top performers and reprimand your bottom performers. If you allow your bottom performers to get away with murder all because you do not want to speak up you run the risk pissing off your good workers. Then all sorts of bad things can come out of that.

Don't be a pushover. There are a lot of people who have a horrible work ethic and if they can get away with it they will. They will back you right up into a corner with their worthlessness and when you ask them to get busy, they give you an incredulous look like why are you asking me to do some work. They get all pissed off and it gets out of hand. Just stop it before it starts by being firm.

Lead by example. Do the things you expect your employees to do. Nothing is worse than someone trying to enforce rules that they themselves do not follow.

Get on the same page. Gather everyone up and let them know where you stand, what your rules are, what's expected, etc. I hate it when people tell me what to do and for that very reason I go over and beyond what is expected of me. Others aren't like that unfortunately. There are some people that aren't autonomous and you will have to direct them every step of the way. It sucks (especially as an ISTP I just think I shouldn't have to tell you every single thing) but it has to be done sometimes.

I honestly think if you be the supervisor you would like to have, you'll be just fine. Just speak up and don't hold anything in. Things fester that way.
be the supervisor you would like to have- -- you should be the new jesus of the department stores all over the world.they should have posters of you up all over just to boost the workers moral. i know that would cheer me up to see those rules written on the wall for all to see so the rule following workers can follow it cos it's the truth. i've been the subordinate to alot of shitty managers over the years. that's one of the reasons i don't last too long in jobs where managers are involved. most of them don't know what they're doing. if every manager followed those simple rules you laid out there working might not be half as scary.
 
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