Personality Cafe banner

1 - 1 of 1 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I post this here in the hope that my fellow INTPs will be able to help me define the cognitive functions on my own terms. Here's what I wrote elsewhere, in my last major attempt at such definitions:

yours truly said:
I insist on clear definitions of any and all of the terms used in Jungian typology. I will therefore formulate what I (mis)understand of it in a list of principles.

1. There are 4 functions: Sensing (S), iNtuition (N), Feeling (F), and Thinking (T).
2. S and N are Perceiving (P) type functions, and F and T are Judging (J) type functions.
3. Each function has an introverted (i) and an extroverted (e) form.
4. The i form of each function is complemented by the e form of the other function of the same type--for instance Si by Ne--and vice versa.

These are the 4 formal principles. Now as for content.

5. S is the kind of P in which images of objects are projected directly by the senses into the consciousness.
6. N is the kind of P in which images of objects are projected by the senses into the consciousness via the unconscious.
7. F is the kind of J in which new object images in the consciousness are accepted or rejected on the basis of whether one likes them in themselves.
8. T is the kind of J in which new object images in the consciousness are accepted or rejected on the basis of whether they cohere with the existing coherent structure of object images in the consciousness. (Exception: the new object image may be accepted and the entire existing structure rejected if the (truth) value of the new object image is indisputable.)

Here we see a discrepancy between the P and the J type functions. For in order for these two types to be symmetrical with each other, the unconscious would have to be mentioned in either principle 7 or 8, or the concept "in themselves" would have to occur in either principle 5 or 6. This is my first problem.

My second problem is that I don't really know what i and e mean in this context, or at least not in a consistent way. I contend that i, for example, must always qualify a function in the same way, regardless of whether it's a P or a J type function. Here's how I (mis)understand the different forms of the functions at the moment, though:

9. Ni projects content from the unconscious onto the object images projected into the consciousness by Se. (The bold part actually contradicts principle 6.)
10. Si projects content from the consciousness onto the object images projected into the consciousness by Ne. (The bold part actually contradicts principle 6.)
11. Fi evaluates on the basis of personal values those object images that have been identified on the basis of group definitions by Te. (The bold part actually contradicts principle 8.)
12. Ti identifies on the basis of personal definitions those object images that have been evaluated on the basis of group values by Fe. (The bold part actually contradicts principle 8.)
Note that principles 7 and 8 may rest on a faulty interpretation of this quote: "[Like Thinking,] Feeling is [...] also a kind of _Judging_, which however is distinct from intellectual judgment [i.e., from Thinking] insofar as it occurs not with a view to establishing a conceptual coherency, but with a view to a first of all subjective accepting or rejecting." (Source: Jung, _Psychological Types_, chapter XI, section 22; my translation.) I once conceived of an alternative interpretation, but have forgotten what it was...

Moreover, please note that I'm not necessarily asking my fellow INTPs to just make minor changes to any of the above; the changes may be vast--whole principles may be rewritten. What I do ask, however, is that the definitions be symmetrical. For example, if Ni is defined as the function that does X in a Q way, then Ne must be defined as the function that does X in an R way, Si must be defined as the function that does Y in a Q way, and Se must be defined as the function that does Y in an R way. Also, the more symmetry the better. Thus I assume that a schematic of S, N, F, and T would look like the red brick below rather than like the yellow one--let alone like the blue one.

Best-Tetris-Games-for-Android.jpg

Jung was big on mandalas, after all.
 
1 - 1 of 1 Posts
Top