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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

I have been giving MBTI tests for about an year now. Initially, the most common results were either INTP or INFP. Now, for the past two months, my results have changed, rather drastically. It shows me as an ISTJ. Its a complete new personality almost the oppsoite of the previous ones.

Now, I do feel that I am an ISTJ, if I break down the four functions individually. But, my doubt is that isn't MBTI dependent upon the mood of a person rather than the personality. How much can I trust the fact that the MBTI personality ISTJ is going to stick with me? Is it my general behavior or just a passing phase?

Also, I am an ISTJ but I have never been good in Maths or Science. I am good at calculations though(probably the fastest in my college) and can do mathematical operations in my mind.

Kindly clarify guys.
 

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Hey all,

I have been giving MBTI tests for about an year now. Initially, the most common results were either INTP or INFP. Now, for the past two months, my results have changed, rather drastically. It shows me as an ISTJ. Its a complete new personality almost the oppsoite of the previous ones.

Now, I do feel that I am an ISTJ, if I break down the four functions individually. But, my doubt is that isn't MBTI dependent upon the mood of a person rather than the personality. How much can I trust the fact that the MBTI personality ISTJ is going to stick with me? Is it my general behavior or just a passing phase?

Also, I am an ISTJ but I have never been good in Maths or Science. I am good at calculations though(probably the fastest in my college) and can do mathematical operations in my mind.

Kindly clarify guys.
Mathematics tends to be a strong subject for ISTJs as well. I suggest you take the cognitive function test to see if you still get either ISTJ, INTP, or INFP. Hopefully it will clear it up for you. (or at least point you in the right direction)

Jungian Cognitive Function Quiz
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey thanx Near Lawliet. I just gave the test again and the results are ISTJ. But, that wasn't really my query. What I am trying to know is if this tendency of being ISTJish going to be with me or change after sometime.
 

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According to the correlating cognitive functions, you are an INFP or ISTJ. I draw this conclusion by the similarities in the answers to tests you've taken; an INFP's cognitive functions are ordered like this: Fi Ne Si Te, while an ISTJ's cognitive functions like this: Si Te Fi Ne. Essentially the same primary functions, just ordered differently.

An INTP is totally different; ordered Ti, Ne, Si, Fe.

Research cognitive functions and you will find your answer.
 

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Hey thanx Near Lawliet. I just gave the test again and the results are ISTJ. But, that wasn't really my query. What I am trying to know is if this tendency of being ISTJish going to be with me or change after sometime.
No, it's not going to change, i think you have finally discovered yourself more, even you say you ARE an ISTJ. Sometimes we will show other types in our behaviour, we are all unique, different percentages of cognitive scores, different upbringings, cultures, experiences, ages and stages in life, but we are dominanty one type mostly over the others. Yes moods can affect scores, but if you identify with ISTJ's, rest assured you are one of them! :)

ISTJ's inferior function is Ne, extraverted Intuiting, so under stress you use Ne in not such a brilliant way. Ni is almost non existant in ISTJ's.

Eruptions of Inferior Extraverted Intuition

When one or more of the preconditions for eruption of the inferior function are present, Extraverted Intuition appears in its more exaggerated, disruptive form. In addition to the general conditions described in Chapter 4, Introverted Intuitive types are vulnerable to the type-specific factors described below. Typical Provocations or Triggers Issues of reality are likely to push the inferior “button” of Introverted Sensing types. Dealing with people whose approach denies facts and actualities (often identified as Extraverted Intuitive types) serves as a trigger for eruptions of harsh, negative, extreme reactions to whatever is being proposed. With the usual

Quenk, Naomi L. (2002-08-13). Was That Really Me? : How Everyday Stress Brings Out Our Hidden Personality (pp. 217-218). NB Ltd. Kindle Edition.

preconditions in operation, even slight deviations from present reality or minor suggestions for future change will provoke Introverted Sensing types to intractable anger and stubborn immovability. One ISFJ said, “If I’m watching the devastating effects of an ongoing crisis and someone says to me, ‘Don’t worry, everything is going to be fine,’ I come unglued. I steamroll over the person and mow them down!” An ISTJ reported that her usual calm demeanor is replaced by cold fury and biting sarcasm when someone tries to contradict the evidence of her senses: “I’m seeing and smelling the ash from this guy’s cigar and smelling the smoke on his breath and he’s telling me he doesn’t smoke cigars!” The prospect of unknown, previously unexperienced activities and situations is a common trigger for Introverted Sensing types. The anxiety associated with the unfamiliar and unimaginable future acts directly on their most unconscious arena. Making careful contingency plans and giving attention to details normally tempers such an unconscious reaction. But when the new possibility comes up suddenly, an inferior function response is likely. An ISTJ described this provocation: When I have to do something that is a completely new experience—for example, fly to a city I’ve never been to, move to a different city, attend a workshop on a topic I know nothing about. Any situation in which I don’t have a clear picture of what I can expect and what is expected of me. The before and waiting period is always worse. Once I’m doing it, I’m fine.

Quenk, Naomi L. (2002-08-13). Was That Really Me? : How Everyday Stress Brings Out Our Hidden Personality (p. 218). NB Ltd. Kindle Edition.

“Overdoing” their own type may also provoke an inferior “grip” response in ISTJs and ISFJs. When this takes the form of doing other people’s assigned duties, working long and hard, and feeling unappreciated or taken for granted, the stage is set for an extreme, spontaneous eruption of inferior Extraverted Intuition. “I get to feeling used and abused,” said an ISFJ. “Then I explode and say awful things that I’m embarrassed about later.” Triggers and Stressors at Work Stressful work environments for Introverted Sensing types are those that are chaotic, noisy, and disorganized; where the rules and procedures frequently change, their work is often interrupted, they are criticized for “lacking vision” or “resisting change,” and they are not recognized for their substantial and consistent work for the organization. ISTJs and ISFJs are quite uncomfortable with unsubstantiated, sweeping statements that lead to decisions at work. ISTJs tend to be more distressed when a system is involved and ISFJs when people will be affected. However, both types find it stressful to do tasks that require Intuition, especially when they have insufficient time to think things through. The teacher quoted earlier in this chapter described as stressful “writing narrative reports, constant interruptions, figuring out what to do with unplanned time.” Introverted Sensing types find an overwhelming workload to be

Quenk, Naomi L. (2002-08-13). Was That Really Me? : How Everyday Stress Brings Out Our Hidden Personality (pp. 218-219). NB Ltd. Kindle Edition.

the most important stressor in their work environment. Having too much to do inevitably affects their ability to live up to their own high standards of performance. One ISTJ said that his strong work ethic forced him to complete his work, but, as a result, he had no time for other things. For other Introverted Sensing types, not having sufficient information to do a good job is equally stressful. One ISFJ teacher cited the following as work stressors: “working with students when I’m not clear on who they are and the new material I’m supposed to teach them.” A source of stress mentioned frequently by ISTJ women is dealing with incompetence at work. Having too much to do appears to be secondary to this stressor for them. One ISTJ woman provided the following very detailed description of work stress, which incorporates many of the issues mentioned by other Introverted Sensing types: Back-to-back meetings. Having to deal with meeting or workshop details while also having to lead a discussion that is hypothesis-like or strategic in nature. Having to check sloppy work of others or deal with another department that maintains low standards. I have to watch myself because I tend to “fix” others’ incompetencies. Too much interacting with people can also be stressful for ISTJs and ISFJs, especially if a great deal of talking occurs. They are likely to view too much talking and too many meetings as wasting time they could be devoting to accomplishing things. The same

Quenk, Naomi L. (2002-08-13). Was That Really Me? : How Everyday Stress Brings Out Our Hidden Personality (p. 219). NB Ltd. Kindle Edition.

relates to being interrupted when they are concentrating on tasks, and to lack of follow-through by co-workers. In fact, anything that prevents or slows achieving closure in their areas of responsibility creates stress for Introverted Sensing types. In a work situation in which the particular stressors for Introverted Sensing types continue over long periods, ISTJs and ISFJs may respond quickly and intensely to the triggers described here. This increases the likelihood that their subsequent demonstrations of “grip” behavior will be frequent and pervasive. When persistent stress causes them to be chronically in the grip of inferior Extraverted Intuition, they are likely to lose touch with their natural talent for assessing reality and their practical grasp of problems. They may become habitual “naysayers,” spreading doom and gloom throughout the workplace.

Quenk, Naomi L. (2002-08-13). Was That Really Me? : How Everyday Stress Brings Out Our Hidden Personality (pp. 219-221). NB Ltd. Kindle Edition.

i just bought that kindle book yesterday and highly recommend it to everyone, it's an interesting study for sure!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
@Dreamer777 Hey, thanx a lot for such a descriptive and helpful post. It really answers so many questions. In fact, its so true to its every word. I behave exactly like how its mentioned in your post,when I am under stress. When I started with MBTI, I did not realize that it is so wide and covers such vast details and answers so many questions.

And the book really seems interesting. I would love to own a copy of it too.
 
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