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So...

I'm 17, and I'm most likely going to pass my 'A-level'* exams in spring. Subjects are history, art, Dutch, English, French, geography and music.

After that, I need to choose something to study.

Problem?

The only things I love enough to not die of depression when dealt with in a day-to-day job are language (/literature) and art. Specifically: I love reading, watching and creating.

I write, draw, photograph, design, poet, art and fear I am not good enough.

So what on earth to study?

My brains are not the problem, if I believed in our juridical system I'd go to law school.

Money is not a problem either as my parents will pay for my education. They have done so for all my siblings.

But I don't know what to do. My art teacher thinks I'm good enough for art school (a dream) and I will apply to one. The admission judges will probably think I'm too young, not developed enough (see how skewed the system is? Urrrgh!), but we'll see. It's not impossible. On the website of this art school, the names and projects of the alumni are mentioned. I've googled many and most of them seem either unemployed or not employed in arts, their work too inaccessible or 'weird'. This is a renowned academy so that's not the issue.

Another thing I'd really like to study is Literature/Science of texts, a university study, but I'm afraid I'll end up having to do something I really hate for money. The literary business mostly annoys me. No, business mostly annoys me.

I wouldn't mind taking a minor in education so I could teach a subject I like, teaching comes naturally to me and I've always like showing and explaining things to others and bringing the best out of them.

On the other hand, I have dreams. Teaching isn't my dream. I want more than that, to mean more than that. But I am scared of failure. I don't care if I won't be wealthy enough to have a big house and a big car and the newest iPad and stuff. I just want to be healthy, to do stuff I love and love what I do, to grow, and to be independent.

I know a lot of you encountered dilemma's similar to mine, having similar interests and ideals, and I'd love to hear some ideas and experiences.

*VWO is a little different in the Netherlands.
 

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Have you thought about becoming a translator? It involves learning many languages (which we are good at) and dealing with texts, literature and many things you mention you like. And it is a job for both Extraverted and Intraverted people.
 
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Take a deep breath....I was once where you were, but not nearly as prepared as you! I'm not aware of the educational system in Netherlands, but I think you're more than capable of becoming as talented as you want to be.

Any of the things you mentioned are worthwhile and promising in my opinion. INFP's crave a creative outlet, so why not let it be one of the choices you mentioned. If I was younger, I'd probably have invested more time in my writing skills, which would augment my creative expression.

Don't just be a writer, artist, poet, designer. Live it.

And, if it's any consolation, Van Gogh didn't become recognized until he was in his late twenties. But I bet those years when he honing his craft were his best years, even though nobody recognized him.

Bonne chance!
 

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So...

I'm 17, and I'm most likely going to pass my 'A-level'* exams in spring. Subjects are history, art, Dutch, English, French, geography and music.

After that, I need to choose something to study.

Problem?

The only things I love enough to not die of depression when dealt with in a day-to-day job are language (/literature) and art. Specifically: I love reading, watching and creating.

I write, draw, photograph, design, poet, art and fear I am not good enough.

So what on earth to study?

My brains are not the problem, if I believed in our juridical system I'd go to law school.

Money is not a problem either as my parents will pay for my education. They have done so for all my siblings.

But I don't know what to do. My art teacher thinks I'm good enough for art school (a dream) and I will apply to one. The admission judges will probably think I'm too young, not developed enough (see how skewed the system is? Urrrgh!), but we'll see. It's not impossible. On the website of this art school, the names and projects of the alumni are mentioned. I've googled many and most of them seem either unemployed or not employed in arts, their work too inaccessible or 'weird'. This is a renowned academy so that's not the issue.

Another thing I'd really like to study is Literature/Science of texts, a university study, but I'm afraid I'll end up having to do something I really hate for money. The literary business mostly annoys me. No, business mostly annoys me.

I wouldn't mind taking a minor in education so I could teach a subject I like, teaching comes naturally to me and I've always like showing and explaining things to others and bringing the best out of them.

On the other hand, I have dreams. Teaching isn't my dream. I want more than that, to mean more than that. But I am scared of failure. I don't care if I won't be wealthy enough to have a big house and a big car and the newest iPad and stuff. I just want to be healthy, to do stuff I love and love what I do, to grow, and to be independent.

I know a lot of you encountered dilemma's similar to mine, having similar interests and ideals, and I'd love to hear some ideas and experiences.

*VWO is a little different in the Netherlands.
Only you have the answer to your riddle.
 

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Do what you love.

If you're like me, you know in your heart what you really want to do, you've just got to summon the courage to go for it.

Feeling the fear/doubt and doing it anyway is part of being an artist. (See this book for more.)

It's not going to be easy, but we would feel worse if we just gave up on our dreams.

Go for it.
 

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Why not teaching art - double major in art and teaching. In your free time you can paint (especially during summer) or draw and when you teach you will give and reicive much joy from a little kids that just created something wonderful.

Recently, I dscovered that I would like to photograph beautiful scenery or unusual animals and other life forms. I like extraordinary vistas, and to travel to those amazing places, and you can still earn some money doing that by selling your photos to magazines of various types (I have FB acquitance who is doing this). You won't be rich, but it could be enjoyable.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all!!! It's so much easier to think about a decision when you can see the arguments next to each other, and not somewhere in de distance of your mind.

Have you thought about becoming a translator? It involves learning many languages (which we are good at) and dealing with texts, literature and many things you mention you like. And it is a job for both Extraverted and Intraverted people.
I have thought about this in the past, and I'd probably like it, as long as it's creative. I sometimes translate stuff for fun, like poetry. But most translating work is very practical stuff and only a few translate nice things like books.

Don't just be a writer, artist, poet, designer. Live it.

And, if it's any consolation, Van Gogh didn't become recognized until he was in his late twenties. But I bet those years when he honing his craft were his best years, even though nobody recognized him. !
Yes! I'd love to! Live it!
On a side note: Van Gogh didn't become recognized until after his death. His brother bought all his paintings. He only realised he wanted to paint in his twenties, that is true.

Only you have the answer to your riddle.
Not even I...

Do what you love.
If you're like me, you know in your heart what you really want to do, you've just got to summon the courage to go for it.
Feeling the fear/doubt and doing it anyway is part of being an artist. (See this book for more.)
It's not going to be easy, but we would feel worse if we just gave up on our dreams.
Go for it.
You're probably right, I should be brave and take the plunge. It's scary, though!

(I looked at the website, they're giving a course on how to balance money and creativity. Cost: $147. I don't think their clients are that desperate, they just want even more money.)

Why not teaching art - double major in art and teaching. In your free time you can paint (especially during summer) or draw and when you teach you will give and reicive much joy from a little kids that just created something wonderful.

Recently, I dscovered that I would like to photograph beautiful scenery or unusual animals and other life forms. I like extraordinary vistas, and to travel to those amazing places, and you can still earn some money doing that by selling your photos to magazines of various types (I have FB acquitance who is doing this). You won't be rich, but it could be enjoyable.
I'm scared about teaching art. I've taken all possible art classes and courses that our high school offered (there are four; practiced arts, art history, cultural and artistic education, and classical arts and culture), so I know art teachers and it seems a hellish job to me. My fellow students in such classes depress me through their lack of interest and I can only imagine what it must be like for the teachers.
 

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Sorry, I thought fine arts like teaching children to pain and draw and be creative. I do not know about elementary and middle school education in Netherlends, but we had a mandatory fine arts education (basically most of it was just creating something not listening about art history or techniques) until high school where it was rather boring (probably because teacher was boring and did not know how to communicate what she knew).
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sorry, I thought fine arts like teaching children to pain and draw and be creative. I do not know about elementary and middle school education in Netherlends, but we had a mandatory fine arts education (basically most of it was just creating something not listening about art history or techniques) until high school where it was rather boring (probably because teacher was boring and did not know how to communicate what she knew).
Oh, no, I'm sorry! I thought you meant high school. Didn't take in the words "little kids"... In Holland, Elementary/Middle school pupils (ages 4-11, high school 12-18) have one teacher for every subjects so there is no such thing as an elementary art teacher.
 

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While reading your post I thought teaching art would be good for you. This would allow you alot of free time to pursue other creative ideas. I've been a nurse for 11 years and am thinking about switching to animal science because I enjoy working with animals more than people. You don't have to be just one thing. You can do something now and switch to something else later or do several at once it's up to you!
 
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Gah, I am also 17 and in exactly your place (except I live in the U.S.). Thus my only advice is to both of us--pursue what you know is important. Cheers! and good luck.
 

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Not doing something because of fear of failure is a bad idea. Why give up on something before you even try doing it in the first place. I agree with refugee, find something creative that you enjoy and live it. Regret is a nasty feeling and failure is only situational. Being 17 means your aloud to make whatever choices you want, if you have no real idea as to what to do then just start with some kind of basic studies program. Your going to find something sooner or later and changing your mind as to what you want is not wrong. Why would you want to choose one thing, make it you, and then resent yourself because of what ever it is that you do you do not like. 17 is young, too young to be worried to much about your future.
 

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You've gotten a couple "be an art teacher, then you'll have free time to work on your art while still earning a living."

I'm not saying, "don't be an art teacher."

But teachers DO NOT have nearly the amount of free time that other people think they do. You can make it happen if you want to. But don't choose any "career" while planning to work on your art on the side unless you're going to be extremely dedicated to it. Even teaching. You can make this path work, if it's what you really want.

On the other hand, if you're like me, and your creativity is stifled by day to day mundane things, then the best advice might truly be something along the lines of living the artist's life, even if it's a struggle of a different kind.

Btw, my first thought was also "maybe a translator" but it sounds like you're more interested in the visual arts. Maybe you could try something in graphic design? There's not a ton of jobs, and you'd have to fit your creativity within the confines of other people's requests, but as jobs go it's not bad for an arty person who can't make a living on their art alone.
 

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And for those who are about to go to College in the US, avoid student loans like the plague, they can't be defaulted, meaning they will get stuck to you until the end of the universe and with the bad economic situation that is going to get worse for a long time it would be a suicide to get into them. If you have talent and you like the crafts you should study them, they will both pay the bills in the future and it will be with something you enjoy.
 
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You're probably right, I should be brave and take the plunge. It's scary, though!

(I looked at the website, they're giving a course on how to balance money and creativity. Cost: $147. I don't think their clients are that desperate, they just want even more money.)
I wasn't endorsing that site. I was endorsing the book that was being discussed in that interview. It's called the War of Art. That interview is just a way to get familiar with the material before buying the book.

I actually started a thread about the book a while back. It's all about the fear and doubt that we face when trying to pursue out artistic endeavors.

I know it's scary. I'm still scared by it. I think the fear and doubt go a away. I think you just have to remind yourself that you feel worse when you ignore the call so you face the fear and work through it.

Easier said than done, of course. I still struggle with it.

The only reason I am even saying this is because there's a good chance that I'm merely reminding you of something you already know to be true in your heart. At least, that is how it usually works for me. Sometimes I just want to make sure I'm not crazy -- and there are people -- if only a few -- that feel the same way. And it gives me a little more courage to hear them say what I already know to be true.
 
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