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Yeah, a little more detail would be helpful.

I've never had any trouble with math, but I've always hated it. I especially hated when the teachers asked me to show my work, and then said my methods were wrong. Just because my math looks messed up shouldn't really matter, I still come up with the right answer 95% of the time in the end, and that's a lot better than other students who do math the "correct" way.
 

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Yeah, a little more detail would be helpful.

I've never had any trouble with math, but I've always hated it. I especially hated when the teachers asked me to show my work, and then said my methods were wrong. Just because my math looks messed up shouldn't really matter, I still come up with the right answer 95% of the time in the end, and that's a lot better than other students who do math the "correct" way.
Not an ISTJ but often had the same problem I wouldn't even know how I'd get an answer. It would just appear in my mind somehow. Or sometimes it wouldn't. But I certainly could never do it the "proper" way.

Intuitives are supposed to be great at math. I'm certainly not. But I know lots of sensors that rock math.
 

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I have never really had any trouble with Maths or Algebra. In fact two of my favourite topics/ subjects of all time has been Algebra and Physics. If you had a specific question in mind, I could show you the correct method and why that is. But if you want to know the proper technique of doing everything in your course then as niss63 said- you should get a good tutor. They would be able to help you much more than half of us combined.
 

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hmm, the istj that i know is a math genius, particularly algebra. whoever said that they heard Ns were supposed to be good at math, im really surprised, ive heard the opposite. ive heard that S=algebra, N=geometry, for in general what we prefer. this post is probably a waste of time though since i really cant help you with math since i suck :/ all i can say is good luck haha. make sure you learn what youre supposed to be doing then practice with someone who understands and then practice on your own once you know what youre supposed to be doing.
 
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How advanced is the algebra? Is it like Darkfiremat's example or just starting with it? 3+4a=23 and solve for a?

Next question is he able to get the correct answer but not understand how to do the "math"? If it is the "math" try converting the issue into a word problem such as, John and Jane have 23 pieces of fruit. John only has 3 apples and Jane has 4 groups of an unknown number of oranges. How many total oranges does Jane have?
 

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I think I should clarify here. I'm not the ISTJ, it's my nephew.

I understand math really well. What I don't understand is how to explain it in a way he'll understand.
I still say get a tutor. They are really good at explaining it so your nephew will understand.

ISTJs understand abstract concepts better if they are related to concrete examples and if they can see the relevance.
 

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hmm, the istj that i know is a math genius, particularly algebra. whoever said that they heard Ns were supposed to be good at math, im really surprised, ive heard the opposite. ive heard that S=algebra, N=geometry, for in general what we prefer. this post is probably a waste of time though since i really cant help you with math since i suck :/ all i can say is good luck haha. make sure you learn what youre supposed to be doing then practice with someone who understands and then practice on your own once you know what youre supposed to be doing.
I'm not so sure about this. I'm most definitely an "S", and I am terrible at Algebra; I struggled with it both in high school AND in college. OTOH, I easily understood geometry.

At any rate, to the OP: take Niss's suggestion and pay for a tutor.
 

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hmm, the istj that i know is a math genius, particularly algebra. whoever said that they heard Ns were supposed to be good at math, im really surprised, ive heard the opposite. ive heard that S=algebra, N=geometry, for in general what we prefer. this post is probably a waste of time though since i really cant help you with math since i suck :/ all i can say is good luck haha. make sure you learn what youre supposed to be doing then practice with someone who understands and then practice on your own once you know what youre supposed to be doing.
I'm going to go with that because I got an A+ in geometry and had to work my butt off to get Cs in algebra.
 

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Geometry was always my preference as well...my friends nevere seemed to understand how I could like it more at all. :mellow:
 
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Hated both but good at both. Prefer algebra over geometry but in general I dislike math, especially the harder courses where it becomes more abstract than concrete when solving problems. I know SJs though that like geometry though as well.
 
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Well, I have always loved Maths (especially algebra). Geometry was the only part of Maths though that I always hated. The moment I was introduced to Algebra- it was like I had found that inner passion and joy for maths. But I don't know how much I wuld contribute to your theory since I am an IxTJ (neither S or N completely).

The way I always saw algebra was the way my techer first described it to me:
You have a gift for christmas. First, you wrap it with gift wrap. Then you stick it together with sticky tape. Then you put ribbons on. Then you place a card on it.
Now, you were given that gift. What do you do? You unpack it. You first take off the card, then the ribbon, then the tape and the gift wrap.
This is precisely what you do in algebra. You have the gift (equation) and you begin to unpack it. You take off the last calculation done to it then the second last and so forth until you have the gift (answer) left.
This explaination helped me a lot earlier on.
HTH
 

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I think you'd have more luck figuring out if they're primarily a visual, auditory or kinesthetic learner.
That way, you can adjust the teaching method for the sensory input they prefer and they can make the proper adjustments to the method of Algebra using their preferred means.

However, on the basis they are ISTJ, maybe you could try and work the problem backwards for them. Just go over the numbers, places, reasons for doing a certain thing and all that fun stuff from every possible angle. Giving them multiple angles allows 'em moar flexibility in more-effectively creating and implementing their own method. Just guide 'em through the learning process. :3
The way I always saw algebra was the way my techer first decsribed it to me:
You have a gift for christmas. First, you wrap it with gift wrap. Then you stick it together with sticky tape. Then you put ribbons on. Then you place a card on it.
Now, you were given that gift. What do you do? You unpack it. You first take off the card, then the ribbon, then the tape and the gift wrap.
This is precisely what you do in algebra. You have the gift (equation) and you begin to unpack it. You take off the last calculation done to it then the second last and so forth until you have the gift (answer) left.
This explaination helped me a lot earlier on.
Haha. Oh wow.
I went over the cognitive functions for the ISTJ and thought "Which function would best be implemented in Algebra to help this person pick it up?"
Saw the Si/Te- So I thought "Okay, some sort of visualization method like 'taking away so many apples from the basket' might work."
I see my little assumption was correct. =D
 

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What I like to do when I am learning a new geometrical or algebraic topic is to break it down into very simple steps. I literally do the math problem out on one side, then write down each step in WORDS beside it. The words itself make it much easier for me to understand when I come back to study it later.

So, if I were to try and teach my younger self algebra (I doubt I would have accepted any help, but let's assume I did), I would break down the mathematical language into our own English language. Math is really only a short hand for ideas involving numbers. So, if someone doesn't understand the short hand, explain it out long hand.

2a + 12 = 32. Find a.

Step 1: Remember BEDMAS (Brackets, Exponents, Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction) in that order. No B, E, D, or M. Move on to A.

How do I cancel addition? Subtraction!

Therefore: 2a +12 - 12 = 32 - 12
Resolves to: 2a = 20

Step 2: Okay. BEDMAS. No B,E or D. There is an M. How do I reverse Multiplication? Division!

2a/2 = 20/2

Resolves to: a = 10

My notebook is full of questions like this. There are more words in my notebook than numbers. Why? Numbers don't mean anything to me a year down the line. Words do.

So, I guess what I'm saying is, break down the problem into ENGLISH, such that the kid can understand it on his terms, and in a convenient language. Once he has the logic of the problem down can he begin to use the short hand that is mathematics.
 

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What I like to do when I am learning a new geometrical or algebraic topic is to break it down into very simple steps. I literally do the math problem out on one side, then write down each step in WORDS beside it. The words itself make it much easier for me to understand when I come back to study it later.

So, if I were to try and teach my younger self algebra (I doubt I would have accepted any help, but let's assume I did), I would break down the mathematical language into our own English language. Math is really only a short hand for ideas involving numbers. So, if someone doesn't understand the short hand, explain it out long hand.

2a + 12 = 32. Find a.

Step 1: Remember BEDMAS (Brackets, Exponents, Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction) in that order. No B, E, D, or M. Move on to A.

How do I cancel addition? Subtraction!

Therefore: 2a +12 - 12 = 32 - 12
Resolves to: 2a = 20

Step 2: Okay. BEDMAS. No B,E or D. There is an M. How do I reverse Multiplication? Division!

2a/2 = 20/2

Resolves to: a = 10

My notebook is full of questions like this. There are more words in my notebook than numbers. Why? Numbers don't mean anything to me a year down the line. Words do.

So, I guess what I'm saying is, break down the problem into ENGLISH, such that the kid can understand it on his terms, and in a convenient language. Once he has the logic of the problem down can he begin to use the short hand that is mathematics.
That actually seems simple to me. Words are good. Numbers are a pain.
 
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