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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've noticed from surfing for jobs that most employers
want extroverts, that's just a fact. What type of jobs have
you discovered fits the INFP? I'm not looking for a career,
I need a buck, but have realized, from experience, that
finding a job that is more-or-less compatible with my
temperament is necessary or I just won't last.
What jobs have you had or have that seem compatible
with being INFP?
 

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Nursing...

I've also worked as a cashier (and currently am doing that as a part-time job on top of my full-time nursing job) and found that it wasn't too bad. When I worked at Walgreens I was a cashier at first before I got cross-trained to work in the photolab as well. I really enjoyed that aspect because I didn't have to deal with people as much, it was repetitive for some parts, and then for others I got to be a little creative with colors and light and whatnot for the printed pictures. It was nice to be able to help people with such things. I also had a lot of fun with some of the more interesting aspects like changing the paper in a dark box by feel through gloves. That was a lot of fun, actually.

My current cashiering job isn't too bad because it's not a huge department store, or anything like Wal-Mart, but a small company that has five outdoor sporting good and ranching stuffs stores that emphasizes one on one customer interaction. It's a little bit easier that way for me not to get completely overwhelmed there.

As for other jobs, I have a friend who worked in a pottery production place and she did a lot of the coloring/painting for the tiles that they had there. She didn't have to talk to many people throughout the day and got to be creative with it. If you're looking for something like that your best bet would be to talk to local art students and galleries as they ought to know what's going on in your area.

Good luck!
 

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I worked as a cashier and a front-end supervisor (staffing, training, cash office responsibilities) and while not the most glamorous job, I enjoyed it. I certainly had to get out of my shell and do things that didn't come naturally to me, so those aspects were beneficial. Plus, I really enjoyed my co-workers. On the down-side, it totally drained me. At the end of each day, I was dead tired.
 

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As a slightly more reserved than average ENFP I would suggest receptionist. It's a fairly social job but since people are listing things like nursing and cashier which to me are far more stressful (I couldn't do nursing in a million years, in person/hands on...yikes!) perhaps it wouldn't be too bad.

I work at an answe service so I talk to people all day, but I can hide behind a computer so it's a good mix of social and private.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a friend who worked in a pottery production place and she did a lot of the coloring/painting for the tiles that they had there. She didn't have to talk to many people throughout the day and got to be creative with it. If you're looking for something like that your best bet would be to talk to local art students and galleries as they ought to know what's going on in your area.

Good luck!
That sounds like a cool gig. Thanks for the idea. I've never thought about
hitting up students or galleries. I'm just basically trying to save up for something
and not looking for a career at the moment so a job that doesn't drain
me totally at the end of the day is something I am looking for as longevity
in the job is the most important thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I worked as a cashier and a front-end supervisor (staffing, training, cash office responsibilities) and while not the most glamorous job, I enjoyed it. I certainly had to get out of my shell and do things that didn't come naturally to me, so that aspect was beneficial. Plus, I really enjoyed my co-workers. On the down-side, it totally drained me. At the end of each day, I was dead tired.
Thanks for the reply. Cashier jobs are okay. I've been a cashier before
and my preference lies on where it is. A cashier at a mom and pop bookstore
is my dream gig since it is not usually packed with people, a cashier at
a chain store would probably not be a good idea.
 

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i'm basically a retail salesman who gets to work from home (working for a very infp friendly company and "selling" stuff that i'm passionate about, which makes it way nice) . working from home I'd argue is the INFP dream haha. the job is great and is helping me pay my way through college.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
As a slightly more reserved than average ENFP I would suggest receptionist. It's a fairly social job but since people are listing things like nursing and cashier which to me are far more stressful (I couldn't do nursing in a million years, in person/hands on...yikes!) perhaps it wouldn't be too bad.

I work at an answe service so I talk to people all day, but I can hide behind a computer so it's a good mix of social and private.
thanks for the reply.

Ya nursing is a no no for me too. I dunno how an INFP can be
a nurse as the empathy thing can turn on them. You can probably
feel everyone's emotions: The doctor getting pissed. The patient
impatiently wanting you to do something. Some other nurse complaining
about something you did while you have 10 other things you need
to do. God bless em. I would be on pills if I had that job.

Unfortunately, I've done the answering service gig and wasn't
my cup of tea either. It helps a bit being an Extrovert. haha
 

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eh...

this probably wouldnt appeal to you, but i didnt hate being a janitor (well, at least, before the management screwed everything up and everyone except for me quit and i was basically running the damned place).

generally quiet, LOTS of time to think, not too much in the way of troublesome customer service/interaction sorta stuff. etc. and it's easy to get hired (well, generally... envisage more grumbling from me for reasons i wont get into).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
i'm basically a retail salesman who gets to work from home (working for a very infp friendly company and "selling" stuff that i'm passionate about, which makes it way nice) . working from home I'd argue is the INFP dream haha. the job is great and is helping me pay my way through college.
Is it a persuasive type of selling or just getting the customers information for
stuff they already want to buy?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
eh...

this probably wouldnt appeal to you, but i didnt hate being a janitor (well, at least, before the management screwed everything up and everyone except for me quit and i was basically running the damned place).

generally quiet, LOTS of time to think, not too much in the way of troublesome customer service/interaction sorta stuff. etc. and it's easy to get hired (well, generally... envisage more grumbling from me for reasons i wont get into).
I've been a janitor in most of my jobs. Great gig, you are right. :happy:
This time I thought I'd branch out a bit to do something different, but
if nothing pans out, I'm probably going to do this again.
 

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Is it a persuasive type of selling or just getting the customers information for
stuff they already want to buy?
Its more just getting customers info on stuff, answering questions, giving suggestions, etc. there is a very little bit of "selling" involved though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Its more just getting customers info on stuff, answering questions, giving suggestions, etc. there is a very little bit of "selling" involved though.
That definitely sounds like a cool gig.:happy:
 

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I'm still trying to figure that one out. Helping people in need is my calling, though I haven't been able to start doing that yet, and I think I would make a good therapist's assistant. I could relate to their suffering and help them feel accepted and validated for their struggle. Who else could offer such compassionate care other than Idealists? I'd also like to be a teacher but I get a lot of anxiety from being up front.
 

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Introverted people people. How does INFP even work? How do you help people without dealing with them or changing yourself?

I try to think of what I do so I could then see how there might be a more paid version of it, but my mind is blank. I don't know what I do, or where the time goes.

Then I think what I'd do if I didn't have to worry about money. I'd be so much more useful to the world in that case, but I don't see how any of it would get me paid. So that's not much help, either...
 

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Jobs ive done that don't involve too much customer face to face work, delivering leaflets(if you got a strong back and can walk for miles), cleaning, catering, portering, admin work, shelf stacking, working from home on the computer.
If anyone is into fashion/art, wants to avoid serving customers and find good career routes from just experience, go for merchandising/window dressing, you don't need a degree, just a creative mind with the ability to follow written instructions.
 

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My previous infp flatmate got a job cleaning power poles... lol she was quite amped for it because she was taught how to abseil. However, it involved a lot of training.

You could look at gardening, fruit picking, child care (my sister had a job while she was in uni walking a young girl to and from school), private cleaning (where you can switch on to auto-pilot and daydream), tutoring... I would love to be a cashier at a bookstore, too, lol.

I took an online assessment last night for a retail job I'm applying for that asked lots of stupid questions like 'I feel comfortable around people quickly' and 'I am hard to get to know' --strongly agree/disagree etc etc.. I lied, and lied again :p. I think introverts can be good at retail though, if they're good at reading people, and can keep their cool with angry customers. My best unskilled job was working retail at a homeware store. There were a lot of quiet periods, and some of the part-timers I worked with were really fun and interesting people, so we could be silly together. It would be neat to work in a music or art store.
 

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i just started out as a server at a restaurant. it's hectic, but i actually don't mind it as much as i thought i would be. i like seeing people happy, and serving food is way better than what i did before, which was working at a freakin' pharmacy. unlike food, messing up with meds is a path to hell. not only that, but pharmacies are swamped with phone calls from doctors' offices, patients with complicated questions (a lot of which only the pharmacist can answer), walk-in customers, drive-thrus, and so on. making a mistake in the pharmacy is very easy to do and very costly if you fuck up because you're dealing with people's lives. so compared to pharmahell, food feels like a breeze. there's also a lot of down time right after lunch time, so you can kinda relax. pharmacies almost always never have down time.

we may be introverts, but that doesn't mean we can't do or even enjoy so-called extroverted odd jobs. i may like being alone, but i still do need some human contact to keep myself from floating away.
 

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MOTM January 2013
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  1. Earn cash tutoring college students. One of the easiest ways for a college or university grad to earn straight cash is to work as a tutor. Some skills that are in very high demand for this could involve tutoring math courses, physics, English literature, history, or languages such as French or Spanish. You could also offer to teach English to new immigrants off the books.
  2. Work as a proofreader. I knew someone when I was in university who had graduated years before who supported themselves, under the table, by proofreading essays and term papers for students and charged by the page.
  3. Make a second income delivering lifestyle services to people’s homes. I have met dozens of women who made ends meet by offering professional salon quality hairstyling - in peoples homes, well below market cost of the typical salon price. The same applies to similar work: manicures, pedicures, massage therapy, aromatherapy, yoga classes, reflexology, reiki, alternative medicine/naturopathy, the list goes on.
  4. Work for extra money in the food and beverage industry. Without a doubt, one of the biggest underground employers is the food industry. Coffee shops, bars, pubs, taverns, restaurants etc have employed many people I have known over the years - many of which have also lived below the radar of immigration services for many years. It is also one of the easiest ways to finance living abroad if you have skills as a cook, bartender or doorperson and want to escape and start a new life abroad.
  5. Offer traditional building trades in your community. This “no-brainer”, like the food and beverage is one of the two most obvious examples of an underground employer. Offering anything from complete major renovations to small carpentry jobs, welding jobs, plumbing repairs. If one is a skilled carpenter with their own facilities, one could even build custom lawn furniture, wooden retro screen doors, stairs - right down to something obscure like custom birdhouses, some of which can fetch over a hundred dollars. The construction industry is a huge consumer of undocumented workers.
  6. Earn profit from your craft skills. Selling anything from homemade soap and paper products, to quilting, sewing, ceramics, pottery, jewelry, screen printed clothing, homemade rugs. I know of a guy who, when he came to Canada, made homemade sandals out of old tires which resembled those popular rubber “crock” style shoes. This same guy used that money to fund a legitimate food and catering business, which he still operates today!
  7. Teach music lessons. Offer guitar lessons in people’s homes. Or piano lessons in yours. The possibilities here are endless.
  8. Rent your home or apartment to tourists. Just check Craigslist and I’ll bet that there are people in your city advertising to rent out their apartments for close to what hotels charge! All you need to be competitive is a place that has a good location for tourists and is of the quality that someone would actually like to rent, and you could be on your way to having a competitive bed and breakfast business.
  9. Clean people’s homes or apartments. Start off by using some free desktop publishing software to make some flyers and then distribute them in your area.
  10. Teach classes in any sort of skill you have. Do you have experience in yoga? martial arts? pottery or ceramics? This could be the prefect income opportunity for you.
  11. Give walking tours of your city. If you live in an urban setting and have knowledge of history, this could make you a good income with tourists. Even better if you can make this service unique, like for example offering a walking tour of famous haunted houses and buildings in your city.
  12. Become a bicycle messenger. If you have bike and being a bit of a road warrior appeals to you, you could make several hundred a week, just for a few days work.
  13. Offer to edit student papers. Live in a university town and have a degree in the Arts? Great, then you can advertise to proof student papers. Maybe there could even be a better income if they want you to write them. Some online services charge as much as $20 a page!
  14. Become a personal assistant. Running errand for execs such as shopping, deliveries, etc can pay handsomely.
  15. Become a pet sitter. Often dog walkers and pet sitters can make $20-30 a day just for a couple of hours doing very little If you love being around animals, as I do, this could be fun as well as lucrative.
  16. Offer services for elderly consumers. Yard work, snow and roof shoveling are very popular and obvious choices here. So are any other rubbish removal, spring cleaning services.
  17. Make a second income growing vegetables in people’s backyards. Got a green thumb? Offer to grow vegetables for people for a low cost, setting them up with a starter home garden which you get paid cash to maintain. Sure, a reasonable rate might only be 20-30 dollars a month, but add this up if you did this for 100 people!
  18. Offer computer repairs. Computer savvy? This could be another perfect way to provide a service for people off of the books.
http://livesafely.org/financial-freedom/underground-economy-work-under-the-table/

Of course, to be taken at individuals own risk.
 

·
MOTM January 2013
Joined
·
10,648 Posts
  1. Earn cash tutoring college students. One of the easiest ways for a college or university grad to earn straight cash is to work as a tutor. Some skills that are in very high demand for this could involve tutoring math courses, physics, English literature, history, or languages such as French or Spanish. You could also offer to teach English to new immigrants off the books.
  2. Work as a proofreader. I knew someone when I was in university who had graduated years before who supported themselves, under the table, by proofreading essays and term papers for students and charged by the page.
  3. Make a second income delivering lifestyle services to people’s homes. I have met dozens of women who made ends meet by offering professional salon quality hairstyling - in peoples homes, well below market cost of the typical salon price. The same applies to similar work: manicures, pedicures, massage therapy, aromatherapy, yoga classes, reflexology, reiki, alternative medicine/naturopathy, the list goes on.
  4. Work for extra money in the food and beverage industry. Without a doubt, one of the biggest underground employers is the food industry. Coffee shops, bars, pubs, taverns, restaurants etc have employed many people I have known over the years - many of which have also lived below the radar of immigration services for many years. It is also one of the easiest ways to finance living abroad if you have skills as a cook, bartender or doorperson and want to escape and start a new life abroad.
  5. Offer traditional building trades in your community. This “no-brainer”, like the food and beverage is one of the two most obvious examples of an underground employer. Offering anything from complete major renovations to small carpentry jobs, welding jobs, plumbing repairs. If one is a skilled carpenter with their own facilities, one could even build custom lawn furniture, wooden retro screen doors, stairs - right down to something obscure like custom birdhouses, some of which can fetch over a hundred dollars. The construction industry is a huge consumer of undocumented workers.
  6. Earn profit from your craft skills. Selling anything from homemade soap and paper products, to quilting, sewing, ceramics, pottery, jewelry, screen printed clothing, homemade rugs. I know of a guy who, when he came to Canada, made homemade sandals out of old tires which resembled those popular rubber “crock” style shoes. This same guy used that money to fund a legitimate food and catering business, which he still operates today!
  7. Teach music lessons. Offer guitar lessons in people’s homes. Or piano lessons in yours. The possibilities here are endless.
  8. Rent your home or apartment to tourists. Just check Craigslist and I’ll bet that there are people in your city advertising to rent out their apartments for close to what hotels charge! All you need to be competitive is a place that has a good location for tourists and is of the quality that someone would actually like to rent, and you could be on your way to having a competitive bed and breakfast business.
  9. Clean people’s homes or apartments. Start off by using some free desktop publishing software to make some flyers and then distribute them in your area.
  10. Teach classes in any sort of skill you have. Do you have experience in yoga? martial arts? pottery or ceramics? This could be the prefect income opportunity for you.
  11. Give walking tours of your city. If you live in an urban setting and have knowledge of history, this could make you a good income with tourists. Even better if you can make this service unique, like for example offering a walking tour of famous haunted houses and buildings in your city.
  12. Become a bicycle messenger. If you have bike and being a bit of a road warrior appeals to you, you could make several hundred a week, just for a few days work.
  13. Offer to edit student papers. Live in a university town and have a degree in the Arts? Great, then you can advertise to proof student papers. Maybe there could even be a better income if they want you to write them. Some online services charge as much as $20 a page!
  14. Become a personal assistant. Running errand for execs such as shopping, deliveries, etc can pay handsomely.
  15. Become a pet sitter. Often dog walkers and pet sitters can make $20-30 a day just for a couple of hours doing very little If you love being around animals, as I do, this could be fun as well as lucrative.
  16. Offer services for elderly consumers. Yard work, snow and roof shoveling are very popular and obvious choices here. So are any other rubbish removal, spring cleaning services.
  17. Make a second income growing vegetables in people’s backyards. Got a green thumb? Offer to grow vegetables for people for a low cost, setting them up with a starter home garden which you get paid cash to maintain. Sure, a reasonable rate might only be 20-30 dollars a month, but add this up if you did this for 100 people!
  18. Offer computer repairs. Computer savvy? This could be another perfect way to provide a service for people off of the books.
Pardon the double post.
 
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