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INTJ 3w4 358 so/sp
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Title has my main question. I'm planning on pursuing a Master's degree then a Ph.D. in the future. If it matters, my program is a double degree in CS and Math and I plan on pursuing graduate studies in Mathematics. I looked around for some advice and most say to be more involved in clubs, participate in internships and research opportunities, and network with professors and other professionals. My current plan is to follow that advice then get some work experience before heading back to university. What other things should I do to better prepare for this?
 

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INTJ 3w4 358 so/sp
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hi! I am not sure that participation in internships can help you prepare for a Master's degree. The math program is very stressful in Universities. I know that bibliography company can advise you on how to prepare for graduate studies as an undergraduate student. They have different programs and always help in writing dissertations or other specific writing. You should contact them for further information
Hi, thanks for your input! What is the "bibliography company" that you're talking about?
 

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Use your undergrad experience to make damned sure you are willing to dedicate years to this.
 

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If I'm not mistaken, you need good grades in undergrad and recommendations letters to enter to the master program. I know some students ask a recommendation letter from a teacher in which they had good grade in their class in undergrad. In some program they require recommendation from your boss and stuff but I think that's mostly for MBA and business degrees.

For my program they only asked me to send them my grades at undergrad and my CV. My program is not a program with a memoir though, it's more practical, I have to do a project at a company (doing a master in business intelligence).
 

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pathway certificates/programs are generally what one chooses when they lack requirements for grad degree, although lacking competitive grades, it could be used for that as well. it could be viewed as grad prep school.

being involved in a programming camp in leadership or tutoring role could be effective, especially if such bootcamp is directed at women in crisis or transition, or empowerment, balancing playing field for girls. - also topical, focusing on those in the fossil fuel industry needed to transition to other careers or learn to code.

but museum internships could be fun, more of a break, valuable skills in learning to drive a golfcart through crowds of people for events. perfectly acceptable to run a few over if not valued guests or donors.
 

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pathway certificates/programs are generally what one chooses when they lack requirements for grad degree, although lacking competitive grades, it could be used for that as well. it could be viewed as grad prep school.

being involved in a programming camp in leadership or tutoring role could be effective, especially if such bootcamp is directed at women in crisis or transition, or empowerment, balancing playing field for girls. - also topical, focusing on those in the fossil fuel industry needed to transition to other careers or learn to code.

but museum internships could be fun, more of a break, valuable skills in learning to drive a golfcart through crowds of people for events. perfectly acceptable to run a few over if not valued guests or donors.
🙄🤣
 
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I finished my MBA this year.

I had to get three recommendation letters from either employers or professors. So I suggest you start looking for those who you know would say something good about you. Pick a professor you interacted with a lot and whose class you had good grades in.

Make sure you are picking a master’s you would benefit from because just having a master’s isn’t really enough of an edge nowadays. I know nothing regarding your career path, so this isn’t specific but basically — if you know what would help qualify you for x y z, consider it more than a subject you’re simply very interested in but isn’t going to open extra doors. It’s a lot of money and a waste of time otherwise. Unless you’re loaded and you’re studying for fun.

Check out their scholarship options. It will most likely depend on your undergrad grades. I was granted 30% off for having good marks.

If you aren’t going to work alongside doing your master’s, take the shortest route. Part time master’s just really mean way too many breaks in between sems and most of your week being free with one or two days jam packed/tighter schedules when you actually do have lectures. Not sure about your options there but in the UK, we have 12, 15 and 24 month options. I took 12 months and even then I had plenty of extra time.

Join societies even just for the sake of knowing people because you never know.. also take advantage of the employability supports and career fairs. Oh and be active or at least check group chats. There’s so many things I would have missed if I hadn’t joined student groups on WhatsApp. I never joined them in my undergrad because I found them pointless but in my MBA, a friend added me to a group and I found out a lot about organisations recruiting, this or that events. Specific info gets passed on faster / better via group chats than in uni boards.

I just had to add: in my experience, it‘s very similar to undergrad. Just a little harder. By harder, I mean that professors are more critical. You are expected to already know how to do things too. The passing rate (at least where I am) is also more difficult. The workload was heavier. We were being asked to submit 2,500 word essays in undergrad, for example. But in my master’s, essays/reports/researches ranged from 3,500 to 8,000 words each.
 

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I have a BS and an MS. Grad school was, for me, somewhat easier than undergrad because I already had a degree and the professors treated me as slightly more human than undergrads. Expectations were still there, but I was no longer treated like a "13th grader." I felt like I knew what I was doing more. I already knew how to research, write papers, and take tests. I wasn't afraid to get up and present information to my classmates and everyone was pretty much supportive because we already knew what it was like to be college students. It really wasn't anything new for any of us. It was a more comfortable atmosphere, however, don't let that lull you into a false sense of security. You still have to put in the work, and you have to be dedicated because even more than undergrad, nobody is going to push you to achieve anything. You have to want it badly enough to stick with it.
 
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smithsonian internships are akin to military recruiters.. they talk a nice game but once in position, you're just a grunt. but still looks good on a c.v.
🤭
 

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Thanks for the useful information, this is an important experience for me. My friends from the magistracy also advised me Custom Essay Writing Service Online - Edusson.com this is a very cool service that quickly and very efficiently performs various kinds of written assignments to order, I am always satisfied with the result and now I can confidently recommend them to you, try it and save your time.
 

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Title has my main question. I'm planning on pursuing a Master's degree then a Ph.D. in the future. If it matters, my program is a double degree in CS and Math and I plan on pursuing graduate studies in Mathematics. I looked around for some advice and most say to be more involved in clubs, participate in internships and research opportunities, and network with professors and other professionals. My current plan is to follow that advice then get some work experience before heading back to university. What other things should I do to better prepare for this?
Getting into a PhD program is not as difficult as most people think it is. The admission process for a PhD is kind of nice. You have a good idea if you’re going to get accepted before you apply. Here is my advice:
1.) Really know what you want to study. You will be dedicating 4+ years studying a very specific topic. You want to make sure you know what you want to study before you go through this process.
2.) Find a faculty member who does this research or has research related to your interest so they would be able to mentor you. You can do this by reading journal articles in your topic of interest and then look up the authors.
3.) When you find a faculty member, shoot them an email (this is done during your masters degree, or bachelors if you skip a masters). Keep it short. Introduce yourself in 1 sentence. Tell them your interests in 1-2 sentence. Tell them what you’ve read of their work that interests you in 1-2 sentences. Tell them what you’d like to study in 1-2 sentences. Ask if they are accepting doctoral students. End. A lot of this is based on funding.
4.) You need to do some due diligence if they say they are accepting students. I would ask your potential mentor’s current or former students how that faculty member was as a mentor. Apply if they say he/she was nice and avoid that place if the students say that faculty member was mean. Trust me. This is crucial and makes or breaks your experience. I flew to the doctoral programs to meet the faculty member and the students, visited a laboratory meeting to see how people interacted, and got lunch with current students to probe.
5.) What you can do now- get involved in research NOW. Getting any experience in matlab, R, python etc is going to be beneficial. Collaborating on any projects with grad students or faculty is a huge benefit. It would be a major bonus if you could get some authorship on a poster presentation or conference paper as an undergrad. Demonstrating that you do research is a big bonus because this stuff ain’t fun. It’s a tedious and lengthy process so faculty want to know you can do it and won’t quit half way through your PhD program after they have invested $200k in you. (Tuition is free, you get healthcare, and get a stipend $15,000-45,000 depending where you go).
Cheers and good luck,
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Getting into a PhD program is not as difficult as most people think it is. The admission process for a PhD is kind of nice. You have a good idea if you’re going to get accepted before you apply. Here is my advice:
1.) Really know what you want to study. You will be dedicating 4+ years studying a very specific topic. You want to make sure you know what you want to study before you go through this process.
2.) Find a faculty member who does this research or has research related to your interest so they would be able to mentor you. You can do this by reading journal articles in your topic of interest and then look up the authors.
3.) When you find a faculty member, shoot them an email (this is done during your masters degree, or bachelors if you skip a masters). Keep it short. Introduce yourself in 1 sentence. Tell them your interests in 1-2 sentence. Tell them what you’ve read of their work that interests you in 1-2 sentences. Tell them what you’d like to study in 1-2 sentences. Ask if they are accepting doctoral students. End. A lot of this is based on funding.
4.) You need to do some due diligence if they say they are accepting students. I would ask your potential mentor’s current or former students how that faculty member was as a mentor. Apply if they say he/she was nice and avoid that place if the students say that faculty member was mean. Trust me. This is crucial and makes or breaks your experience. I flew to the doctoral programs to meet the faculty member and the students, visited a laboratory meeting to see how people interacted, and got lunch with current students to probe.
5.) What you can do now- get involved in research NOW. Getting any experience in matlab, R, python etc is going to be beneficial. Collaborating on any projects with grad students or faculty is a huge benefit. It would be a major bonus if you could get some authorship on a poster presentation or conference paper as an undergrad. Demonstrating that you do research is a big bonus because this stuff ain’t fun. It’s a tedious and lengthy process so faculty want to know you can do it and won’t quit half way through your PhD program after they have invested $200k in you. (Tuition is free, you get healthcare, and get a stipend $15,000-45,000 depending where you go).
Cheers and good luck,
Thank you, this is very helpful and in line with what I've heard from other PhD students and alumni. I'm certainly working on the research part and keeping connected with grad students, mentors, and experts in my field. This is great to know for future reference, thank you once again!
 

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Start looking at gre subject & qualification exam questions.
Start studying prelims for HoTT (ie, homotopy/topology, abstract algebra, type theory).
Practice presenting and debating your ideas, and learn how ideas get resourced/funded.
 
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