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The title speaks for itself + does it pay well?

I'm doing nursing atm, but I'm strongly considering doing psychology afterwards and branch out to neuropsychology.

Your opinions will be highly appreciated.
 

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Based on my knowledge and experience, studying Neuropsychology is as equally effortful as it is to study Clinical Psychology or any other profession within the helping fields. Studying Neuropsychology, over all, takes an approximation of five years (PhD) after receiving a Master's in Clinical Psychology.

The following is an excerpt from O*Net OnLine's Career Page for Neuropsychology:
19-3039.01 - Neuropsychologists and Clinical Neuropsychologists

Apply theories and principles of neuropsychology to diagnose and treat disorders of higher cerebral functioning.

Sample of reported job titles: Clinical Neuropsychologist, Professor, Neuropsychologist, Neuropsychology Service Director, Pediatric Neuropsychologist

Tasks
  • Write or prepare detailed clinical neuropsychological reports using data from psychological or neuropsychological tests, self-report measures, rating scales, direct observations, or interviews.
  • Read current literature, talk with colleagues, and participate in professional organizations or conferences to keep abreast of developments in neuropsychology.
  • Educate and supervise practicum students, psychology interns, or hospital staff.
  • Distinguish between psychogenic and neurogenic syndromes, two or more suspected etiologies of cerebral dysfunction, or between disorders involving complex seizures.
  • Diagnose and treat pediatric populations for conditions such as learning disabilities with developmental or organic bases.
  • Conduct neuropsychological evaluations such as assessments of intelligence, academic ability, attention, concentration, sensory-motor function, language, learning, and memory.
  • Provide psychotherapy, behavior therapy, or other counseling interventions to patients with neurological disorders.
  • Design or implement rehabilitation plans for patients with cognitive dysfunction.
  • Diagnose and treat neural and psychological conditions in medical and surgical populations such as patients with early dementing illness or chronic pain with a neurological basis.
  • Interview patients to obtain comprehensive medical histories.

Tools & Technology
Tools used in this occupation:

Cognitive or dexterity or perceptual or sensory evaluation or testing products — Auditory stimulation equipment; Block pattern sets; Visual stimulation test equipment; Wisconsin Card Sorting Test
Facsimile machines — Fax machines
Notebook computers — Laptop computers
Photocopiers — Photocopying equipment
Therapeutic pegboards or activity boards — Pegboards

Technology used in this occupation:

Analytical or scientific software — Noldus Information Technology The Observer; SPSS software; Statistical software
Electronic mail software — Email software
Medical software — Behavioral Assessment and Research System BARS; BrainMetric The Category Test; BrainTrain Captain's Log; The Tova Company Test of Variables of Attention
Office suite software — Microsoft Office software
Spreadsheet software — Microsoft Excel

Knowledge
Psychology — Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
Therapy and Counseling — Knowledge of principles, methods, and procedures for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and for career counseling and guidance.
English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Medicine and Dentistry — Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
Education and Training — Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
Biology — Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
Sociology and Anthropology — Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.
Law and Government — Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.

Skills
Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
Complex Problem Solving — Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
Science — Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.

Abilities
Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Category Flexibility — The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.

Work Activities
Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others — Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
Documenting/Recording Information — Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
Analyzing Data or Information — Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge — Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
Processing Information — Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
Communicating with Persons Outside Organization — Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Work Context
Face-to-Face Discussions — How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job?
Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — How important is being very exact or highly accurate in performing this job?
Telephone — How often do you have telephone conversations in this job?
Freedom to Make Decisions — How much decision making freedom, without supervision, does the job offer?
Indoors, Environmentally Controlled — How often does this job require working indoors in environmentally controlled conditions?
Duration of Typical Work Week — Number of hours typically worked in one week.
Structured versus Unstructured Work — To what extent is this job structured for the worker, rather than allowing the worker to determine tasks, priorities, and goals?
Electronic Mail — How often do you use electronic mail in this job?
Letters and Memos — How often does the job require written letters and memos?
Spend Time Sitting — How much does this job require sitting?

Job Zone
Title: Job Zone Five: Extensive Preparation Needed
Education: Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).
Related Experience: Extensive skill, knowledge, and experience are needed for these occupations. Many require more than five years of experience. For example, surgeons must complete four years of college and an additional five to seven years of specialized medical training to be able to do their job.
Job Training: Employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.
Job Zone Examples: These occupations often involve coordinating, training, supervising, or managing the activities of others to accomplish goals. Very advanced communication and organizational skills are required. Examples include librarians, lawyers, aerospace engineers, wildlife biologists, school psychologists, surgeons, treasurers, and controllers.
SVP Range: (8.0 and above)

Education
Education Level Required: Doctoral or professional degree

This occupation may require a background in the following science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educational disciplines:

Life Sciences — Clinical Child Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Physiological Psychology/Psychobiology

Interests
Interest code: ISA

Investigative — Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Social — Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Artistic — Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Work Styles
Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
Analytical Thinking — Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Concern for Others — Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.

Work Values
Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Recognition — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

Wages & Employment Trends
National
Median wages data collected from Psychologists, All Other.
Employment data collected from Psychologists, All Other.
Industry data collected from Psychologists, All Other.

Median wages (2011): $43.27 hourly, $90,010 annual
Employment (2010): 18,000 employees
Projected growth (2010-2020): Average (10% to 19%)
Projected job openings (2010-2020): 8,700
Top industries (2010): Government; Self-Employed
I commend you for your interest in this amazing field. I would love to show you a paper I have written on some of the things Neuropsychologists study and deal with. If you are interested, send me a private message. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Based on my knowledge and experience, studying Neuropsychology is as equally effortful as it is to study Clinical Psychology or any other profession within the helping fields. Studying Neuropsychology, over all, takes an approximation of five years (PhD) after receiving a Master's in Clinical Psychology.


I commend you for your interest in this amazing field. I would love to show you a paper I have written on some of the things Neuropsychologists study and deal with. If you are interested, send me a private message. :)
Even if this thread has only got one response, this is by far the most comprehensive response I've ever received on any thread I've started on any category. Thank you very much. :)
 
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