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Wow. So many forum users only use English as a second language. That is quite impressive. Most english speaking people I know do not know or foreign language, or at least can't speak it fluently. English is known as the world language though, so those who have it as a first language might not be so inclined to learn a second one.

I started learning french at school and I was good at it, but quit the class very decisively because I couldn't tolerate the teacher (they were really were a jerk). I would be interested in learning and mastering another language, just don't know how to exactly.
 

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I learned another language (french) because I am in french Immersion! I literally have all/most of my high school subjects in french. I've been in the french immersion program since grade 6, but in Canada, french is mandatory in grade 4 and 5.
 

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Wow. So many forum users only use English as a second language. That is quite impressive. Most english speaking people I know do not know or foreign language, or at least can't speak it fluently. English is known as the world language though, so those who have it as a first language might not be so inclined to learn a second one.

I started learning french at school and I was good at it, but quit the class very decisively because I couldn't tolerate the teacher (they were really were a jerk). I would be interested in learning and mastering another language, just don't know how to exactly.
Best way is to travel a lot, and speak a lot with people with a that native language (online is possible too). Otherwise, a lot of reading or playing games in different languages. Just learn the basics, and then you have to read a lot, write a lot, speak a lot, listen a bit.
 
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English is my 3rd language.
I never use it irl, only on the internet.

I taught myself when I was about 15-16 y/o by listening to tons of US and British music (mostly 2pac and Eminem back in 1999-2001), and watching lots of Hollywood movies with Spanish subtitles.

I also enjoyed reading the Spanish-English dictionary for fun, just like I would read any other book. My mom saw me so obsessed with it that one day she surprised me with a brand new huuuuge hardcover dictionary, and I swear I almost had tears in my eyes. I remember sleeping with said huge dictionary, cuddling with it and reading random pages. It gave me comfort. Yeah, I antropomorphize objects, not unheard of for INFPs, even grown up ones lol.

I also discovered a channel on tv where on sunday nights around 1am they would air Dawson's Creek in English with Spanish subtitles. Since I couldn't stay up that late because there was high school on monday, I would record it on VHS tape and watch it on my own time, over and over and over.

That's about it. Tons of hours put into it. I would say I would spend about 6-8 hours a day, 7 days a week, reading & watching movies and shows & listening to music. I lost myself in this hobby. I never did it with the intention of ever using it, since I didn't have internet at the time and I never imagined that the internet would be "a thing" and I would be able to communicate with actual English speakers. My dad got us internet a year or so before I started university, and I could finally practice with real people. My vocabulary expanded thanks to the internet & also thanks to the fact that I started reading stuff like Jane Austen, the Brontës, E.A. Poe, Sherlock Holmes, Harry Potter, in English (I had only read Spanish and Catalan translations until that point).

And that is the story xD
 
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All of my language-learning just 'happened'. Before I knew it, I knew the language alright after watching a lot of things in that language or playing games in that language. That unfortunately makes me have no advice on studying a language, since every time I study a language, I feel like I'm missing a bunch of pieces I should be intuitively knowing, mostly because language classes do things all step by step with grammar and vocabulary, but because of that very nature, I end up forsaking the previous step to memorize the next one, when my language-learning experience just had me intuitively connecting the dots about the meaning of things and figuring them out like that so I'd have this unconscious memory of the general idea of the language. But then again, after you know the general idea of the language, I find that language classes can serve to refine your fluency on the language because you'll have the technical parts to reinforce your knowledge and you'll be able to use the language better.

Another thing is that you have to consistently be around things in that language or you'll forget it. Even if you were once fluent in one language, if you never use it or are around anything in that language, you will get horribly rusty: my mother was fluent in French but she now can't even say a sentence (my own French is bad because I just had a few classes about it). So even if the language you're learning isn't one you encounter in your surroundings, it's good to either use it to think (you know how you think with your first language? switch it to the other language; for example, my thinking language is English, my second language) or go on the internet and find games or movies or just about anything you can that you can enjoy about the language. What sucks is that less popular (?) languages (?) can have less content for you to check out, and the method of being around a certain language a lot can vary in efficiency depending on the person. There are people who learn super fast this way, and people who learn really slowly this way. There are people who do better by sheer studying. I wish I had something substantial to say in regards to the people who aren't good with just absorbing the language, but that's really the only way I did things.

I use my first language in real life, and my second and third for thinking, but I find that my first language rusted a bit because of it, too. That's the downside of knowing a lot of languages: when you're good at a bunch of them, it's hard to become excellent at any of them. I'm meh at all of them X.X
 

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Audiences fail to show up
It can be one of the worst disasters possible for any event. Poor turnout can spoil all your hard work. Imagine only a few people sitting in a huge hall when you have spent quite a lot in the event preparation.

Equipment failure
Just think of a situation when the microphone of the speaker does not function properly, the Internet connectivity get lost or your video presentation just won’t play. As a preventive measure, you should have a strong AV partner collaborating with you where the event is taking place and who you can completely rely on. You also need to conduct a rehearsal before the D-day. Remember to trial all you’re A/V systems, laptops, as well as, projectors, which will be used. Let your speakers handle them when they rehearse their speeches.

Drop-out of participants
It can be a massive disaster too. You find your special guest, headline band or keynote speaker failed to attend the event. Their flights could have been delayed, not feeling well or simply let you down.

globibo.com
 

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I learned Finnish on habbohotel.fi when I was 12. I learned 'I speak English, I speak a little Finnish, how do you say XYZ in Finnish' and I was set. Still remember loads of it years later. I learned ASL when I was 13 from an interpreter in my classroom. I went on 'vows of silence' and would only speak in ASL, learning similar phrases ('how do you say [XYZ - fingerspell] in ASL') and picking up vocabulary as I needed it. I then attended ASL classes and Deaf clubs. I am fluent in it but I only received a level 5 cert.

I'm learning Polish through Duolingo, internet forums, YouTube videos and chatrooms. As a 26 year old I've found it's been significantly harder to retain vocabulary (Duolingo is not the best to learn vocabulary, my memory is poorer). Most of my peers are no longer children who find it interesting that someone is willing to learn their language (such as in the case of Finnish, where people readily volunteered to help me along), which has made assimilation harder.
 

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I've learnt english mainly through playing video games, looking up information in English (which usually has more information on a certain subject than Dutch) and using online forums, and interacting wih English people online. I also watch movies in English with dutch subtitles, and sometimes even english subtitles. In some movies, i'm even able to watch them without subtitles (usually horror movies, since they're easier to follow). Dutch is my native language. French is my third language, but i should try to get better in it, and it's a hard language. I know the basics but not more than that. I should try to use French wikipedia more often, and engage more in it. I would love to get better in more languages: german, spanish and swedish.
 
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I learned French through reading fiction books and novels. My diary is also in French. (4th language)

I'm trying to create a French Internet life as well but it hasn't bloomed yet. A lot of forums can be dead. Places like LiveJournal also used to be huge when I was young. Is it instagram now? I got lost out of the internet loop at some point.
I sometimes meet French customers at work and one of my managers in the past was. Only thing is canadian french is a little hard to understand.
The last movie I watched in a theatre was French. So there is some way for me to live France in my country. My last purchase was actually cookies by StMichel :tongues: I've been in my city for several years but never found these.
Oh and the children in the upstairs apartment appear to go to French immersion school as well!

I studied Japanese on my own when I was a child. I think it was my brother's book actually. My aunt's friend had mailed a beginner's book as a gift.
After that, I just kept going. When I'd come home for lunch, I would watch a Japanese language show. I don't think I've seen one as awesome as that. I believe it was by NHK.
And a lot of my parents' friends hosted Japanese students, including my high school. So it was very much all around my life. (3rd language)
 

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I was reading through these responses amazed that so many people here learned English as their second language. And then I remembered that technically, I did too.. I grew up speaking Spanish and was about five or six when I learned English basically by immersion in my kindergarten class. Of course, it's so much easier to pick up on a language when you're that young.

In high school I took French for several years and am now to the point that I can pick up on a lot of words, and can usually determine at least the general idea of what someone is saying. It's definitely harder to teach yourself once you're not taking classes anymore. But one strange thing that has actually helped me is following French bloggers, or other popular figures, on places like Instagram. I've learned a lot of new words thanks to this one blogger I follow, and just hearing her speak it in her stories and videos helps me get used to the language. That's probably the laziest way to do it, but it has helped quite a bit, with minimal effort on my part. :)
 

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Thanks everyone for your responses, it's interesting to read although I am still struggling a little bit with German, it's at least going a bit better now, I'm slowly learning. Grammar is probably one of the hardest parts for me. So, for a follow up question if anyone wants to answer, how do you find learning and picking up the grammar? How do you do it? I know that some people have said they just do what "feels" right and I understand this because I think this way in English. However I'm not able to do it with German and that kind of frustrates me. I'm not sure how.
 

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I learned English at school, but on top of that I learned a lot of new words from games. Whenever I ran into a new word, I checked its meaning. Because of this I have a much broader vocabulary in English than the average Finn. Being really into games also meant that I kept constantly using English, and these days I use about as much English as my native Finnish. Some days more.
Learning the grammar didn't take that much attention, since I learned it at school, but I think what'd work for me would be to focus one one thing at a time, and learn it well before moving on to something else. I've used so much English, that I no longer remember the grammar rules, most of the time I just know how it works.
 

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English is my second language. The best way to learn a new language is to be interested in something that actually requires using that language. I learnt English because I wanted to understand Beatles' lyrics. Then I wanted to read Harry Potter and I only had the English version available. Then I wanted to use the internet and participate in forums. That led me to meet people, so I had to use the language in communication.

The best way to learn a language is to immerse yourself in that language. The bad thing about German is that since most Germans speak English, "German-only" forums, for example, are hard to find. There are some, but they are not necessarily interesting since for the same topic there are other forums in English. I personally find it hard to participate just for the sake of learning the language if I' m not that invested in the topic.
 

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English is my second language. The best way to learn a new language is to be interested in something that actually requires using that language. I learnt English because I wanted to understand Beatles' lyrics. Then I wanted to read Harry Potter and I only had the English version available. Then I wanted to use the internet and participate in forums. That led me to meet people, so I had to use the language in communication.

The best way to learn a language is to immerse yourself in that language. The bad thing about German is that since most Germans speak English, "German-only" forums, for example, are hard to find. There are some, but they are not necessarily interesting since for the same topic there are other forums in English. I personally find it hard to participate just for the sake of learning the language if I' m not that invested in the topic.
Indeed, there are no interesting forums in german and french unfortunately. Dutch has 9lives (Belgian gaming forum) or Fok! (Dutch forum), and they're both the two largest in the country. But i don't know German-based or French-based forums unfortunately...

@entheos; is there a spanish forum?
@attic; is there a swedish forum?
 

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Runescape is actually a good game to learn a new language, because of all the skills that do exist and that involve basic words... (like the cooking skill) and the quests you have to do in the game. I think games in general can really help if you just alter the language settings.

I've just checked my TBBT box, but it only has nordic languages, no german, spanish or french, but polish, swedish, finnish, norwegian, dutch, english, castellano, portuguese and danish... I think later seasons have different languages (like spanish and german), but they don't have french... and i'm looking for a way to improve my french... I might block english and dutch wikipedia so that i'm forced to use the french wikipedia... but it's really hard... it's just really hard to understand french, because they speak so INSANELY fast and it has different grammar. English is so easy compared to french, really.
 

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I already often use the english wiki because the dutch wiki is less complete than the english one obviously, but to see movies, i also sometimes have to use english subtitles. Sometimes i see english movies with english subtitles, or foreign language movies with english subtitles, because there are no available dutch subtitles lol... I just need a way to use french subtitles with tv shows or movies... but i have no idea what is best to do. Maybe i'll have to try french subtitles on a french movie i've already seen... ? Or do i need to watch pokémon again spoken in french? haha. No idea what is best to do. The wiki is often academically written, so that might not be ideal to learn a language... Even know in english, i sometimes now political terms and academic words better than basic words like refrigerator or fridge.
 

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My family's trilingual so I grew up with it, including multiple dialects in one. I also took one of the languages for seven years in school to buff up the written aspect.
 

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I'm very good in dutch though (my native language), especially my spelling of the words is (even if say it myself) insanely good... Others people have really trouble detecting a mistake in what i write (and if they do it's mainly because i pay no attention to grammar lol or sentence structure), but my words are almost always spelled correctly no matter how difficult they are... And my family members always have to ask me questions like: how is vacation spelled??? Lol... So easy words... Really? It's so embarassing. But the spelling of words is such a natural gift, even in names and foreign languages, i have a gift to easily pick up how something is spelled. I think even in english i know very well how words are spelled, just like in french. I need very little experience in a language, before i can pick up the spelling rules of most words.
 

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Thanks everyone for your responses, it's interesting to read although I am still struggling a little bit with German, it's at least going a bit better now, I'm slowly learning. Grammar is probably one of the hardest parts for me. So, for a follow up question if anyone wants to answer, how do you find learning and picking up the grammar? How do you do it? I know that some people have said they just do what "feels" right and I understand this because I think this way in English. However I'm not able to do it with German and that kind of frustrates me. I'm not sure how.
Well I'm studying French and French is a lot like English, so I normally don't study grammar. But when I read novels, I do sometimes find arrangements that are new to me--and I just look those up. Or some words/verbs have their own built-in uses (grammar).
I've been meaning to get an actual textbook on French and learn it from the start. But it's amazing how far I've got, just by reading stories. Some textbooks are a little boring.
I tried an audiobook and it was actually a nice change.

How are people with listening skills? Does it really help to watch movies with subtitles? I find French can speak too quickly, I just pick up a few words. I cannot analyze the words and pick the ones I don't know and look them up, like I can when I read.
 
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