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When I was in school I would usually be quiet but not paying attention.

Would doodle or write down lyrics of whatever song I was enamoured with at the time.

If the class interested me I'd pay more attention, but I never cared for acting nice or being obedient.

At University where I had more choice over which modules I took and I actually gave a f*ck I was not a star pupil, but one of the more interested for sure. Would often ask questions or debate a different pov. It was surprisingly well received by most professors, which made me re-evaluate my stance on studying in general.
 

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the stereotypical entp, "the loud nerd" i would always be talking, interrupting everyone but still paying attention.
 

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Do you talk a lot? Go on your phone a ton
Hahaha, phones in the classroom. That was a startlingly foreign concept to me when I read it. I also walked uphill both ways...

Anyway, when I was a young elementary school student, I was usually pretty keen on what the teacher had to say, and I tried to be friendly with my classmates. By later elementary, I had gravitated towards sitting at the back of the class, trying to will myself invisible to the people around me, and took to doodling in the margins of my notebook while the teacher talked. This remained consistent throughout the rest of my education.

I did initially correct teachers when they were wrong, but this did not go over well, so I ceased participation entirely. Made me quite bitter about the participation grade.

Granted, I did develop a bad attitude about it all, which doesn't help. I just felt like I couldn't relate very well to my classmates (they weren't mean, just...not sure how to talk to me I think, and I wasn't sure how to talk to them. It was very awkward), and school became this representation of how I was a failure (I had a B average instead of an A, which caused my parents to be furious at me extremely frequently, and made going to school extremely depressing because it would directly lead to upsetting my parents again), so it was tough to go every day.
 

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I'm an INFJ (for those on mobile).

In elementary, I was extremely quiet. I never spoke in class, never asked questions, didn't really make friends or anything. I did my work slowly. My teachers described me as "meticulous" (I think this has only somewhat to do with me being an INFJ and quite a lot with my enneagram being a 1). Around first grade, when one first learns to really read (not "see Jane run"), I read very slowly in class and at a normal, flowing speed at home. This placed me into the lowest reading group in my class. It caused such confusion with my parents that the teacher had me read to her in private, where I read with startling fluidity. I had apparently been reading slowly because the other children in my class were reading slowly. This, on the other hand, probably had a lot to do with me being an INFJ (all that Fe and striving for normalcy and connection).

In middle school, I became less awkward, and I began making a couple friends, but I reached out for misfits (somewhat because I was one but also because they had no friends either). I was still very quiet in class, never talked when the teacher talked. It was rare when I got in trouble, and when I did, it was because of day dreaming and not paying attention. As an 11-14 year old, my attention span was very loosely, if at all, disciplined. So yeah, still quiet, always letting my mind wander, never taking notes, always doodling.

In high school, I cracked down on my attention span. I found myself doodling in classes I had no care for, but listening and engaging myself in classes that I was interested in. High school was mostly a breeze. Sometimes challenging, but mostly easy. I reached the realization that as long as I did the work, I would pass. Grades are a measure of how well you complete the syllabus. I was sometimes a little ENTP-ish in classes I felt comfortable in, responding sarcastically to my peers and sometimes to teachers I knew well enough. Never had my phone in class or anything like that, though.

Now, in college, I'm quiet and a bit studious in classes I like. I'm engaging more than I ever have before. College is a breeze, because I like it. I rarely talk in class, and I always take notes. I'm not in class to make friends; I'm there to learn and improve. If I make friends in my classes, it's usually for networking purposes or to ask people about assignments or they've piqued my interest. A lot of my classes have days fully dedicated to discussion, and those are my favorite days. I love hearing other people's opinions, and when someone says something that I resonate with, then I make an attempt to be their friend. I'll sometimes ask questions, but I get shaky and can feel my heart beating when I do, so I tend to shy away from asking professors anything in class.
 

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Loud and obnoxious for a bit because I had nothing better to do then I realized that was retarded and shut up for the remaining six years.
 

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In high school I'd either sleep or be constantly laughing my ass off and not paying any attention. Pretty sure most of my teachers didn't like me. Now that I'm in uni, I pay attention and talk to the people around me if it's appropriate (asked by the prof to discuss, confused about something, etc).
 

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Currently, I'm in my first year of university, but I assume this is in the context of high school, so I'll discuss that. I'm an ENTJ, by the way.

To begin, almost all my classes in high schools were advanced classes (I took all the ones my school offered). Plus, my grad class had quite a few smart people, making it my high school's most competitive class. For instance, our tenth ranked student would have been top three easily (maybe even first), with the same marks, in one of the other grad classes.

So, I'm assuming most of you would expect the classes would be very quiet and focused, if it was so competitive? Well, no, they were probably the opposite, and I personally was a big factor in that. A lot of us found the material very easy and could get very high marks without putting in much effort. In fact, admitting you studied would often ruin the validation of how high you scored in the eyes of others. So, we wouldn't pay attention in class and would just talk the whole time, often quite loudly. Sometimes, we'd even hit each other and shit like that (it was all guys in these groups). Of course, the more studious in the classes didn't like this, but we also didn't care. And because we were the top students most teachers didn't care enough to get mad at us for not paying attention.

I was also known for arguing with teachers (I even found out it wasn't unusual for me to be brought up in staff meetings). For example, if I disagreed with teacher's marking (which was often) I would always dispute it (more than probably any other student). And I usually got the marks too, which was nice. In any sort of social studies class I would often state my opinions on what was being discussed (when it was contextually appropriate), which tended to be quite different from the teacher's and the classes'. But most teachers appreciated this and usually encouraged the discussion. I could also be a bit of a smart ass when dealing with teachers, but it was done in jest. Because, despite all these traits, most of the teachers did like me. It was obvious I cared about doing well (despite not being the most traditionally focused student) and I feel some teachers felt me and a lot of my friends had been let down by the school system not providing an appropriate challenge. Also, I showed off a lot of personality in class, while most students didn't, so I suppose it was refreshing in its own way.

Overall, it was a fun experience, especially when compared to now. Nowadays, I have no friends, so I have nobody to talk to in lectures (just play poker on my tablet, while taking notes) and being a top student actually requires me to study and do homework, usually every night.
 

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Currently, I'm in my first year of university, but I assume this is in the context of high school, so I'll discuss that. I'm an ENTJ, by the way.

To begin, almost all my classes in high schools were advanced classes (I took all the ones my school offered). Plus, my grad class had quite a few smart people, making it my high school's most competitive class. For instance, our tenth ranked student would have been top three easily (maybe even first), with the same marks, in one of the other grad classes.

So, I'm assuming most of you would expect the classes would be very quiet and focused, if it was so competitive? Well, no, they were probably the opposite, and I personally was a big factor in that. A lot of us found the material very easy and could get very high marks without putting in much effort. In fact, admitting you studied would often ruin the validation of how high you scored in the eyes of others. So, we wouldn't pay attention in class and would just talk the whole time, often quite loudly. Sometimes, we'd even hit each other and shit like that (it was all guys in these groups). Of course, the more studious in the classes didn't like this, but we also didn't care. And because we were the top students most teachers didn't care enough to get mad at us for not paying attention.

I was also known for arguing with teachers (I even found out it wasn't unusual for me to be brought up in staff meetings). For example, if I disagreed with teacher's marking (which was often) I would always dispute it (more than probably any other student). And I usually got the marks too, which was nice. In any sort of social studies class I would often state my opinions on what was being discussed (when it was contextually appropriate), which tended to be quite different from the teacher's and the classes'. But most teachers appreciated this and usually encouraged the discussion. I could also be a bit of a smart ass when dealing with teachers, but it was done in jest. Because, despite all these traits, most of the teachers did like me. It was obvious I cared about doing well (despite not being the most traditionally focused student) and I feel some teachers felt me and a lot of my friends had been let down by the school system not providing an appropriate challenge. Also, I showed off a lot of personality in class, while most students didn't, so I suppose it was refreshing in its own way.

Overall, it was a fun experience, especially when compared to now. Nowadays, I have no friends, so I have nobody to talk to in lectures (just play poker on my tablet, while taking notes) and being a top student actually requires me to study and do homework, usually every night.
I'm not trying to be offensive, just sincerely curious. I understand not feeling motivated without a challenge, but did you ever feel like maybe you didn't exhibit a certain integrity that scholars should have? People study to learn the material, not to get the grade. Did you ever feel like your methods in high school were disingenuous?

EDIT: For example, you said that studying would take away the validation of one's score on a test. I personally don't see it that way at all. Studying determines how long one will retain information. It's important, because it allows you to grow a wealth of knowledge, a filing cabinet of bits of learned material in your brain. Store it for later, not for a test.
 

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Minor class clown, but I generally liked learning if it wasn't English so I would either space out or pay attention. "Going on your phone" sounds like something the authoritarian environment of school would punish you for in an instant. When I was in high school, we weren't even allowed to have them out in the lunch room.
 

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I'm not trying to be offensive, just sincerely curious. I understand not feeling motivated without a challenge, but did you ever feel like maybe you didn't exhibit a certain integrity that scholars should have? People study to learn the material, not to get the grade. Did you ever feel like your methods in high school were disingenuous?

EDIT: For example, you said that studying would take away the validation of one's score on a test. I personally don't see it that way at all. Studying determines how long one will retain information. It's important, because it allows you to grow a wealth of knowledge, a filing cabinet of bits of learned material in your brain. Store it for later, not for a test.
No, it's a perfectly reasonable question.

I'll focus more on me personally, since I can't really speak for my friends. I know lots of people who learned to game the system in high school, and could have very superficial knowledge and do really well (especially in math, which I'll get more into). But I honestly feel I didn't do that (of course, this could just be Dunning-Kruger in effect). And keep in mind, I mean superficial relative to this level, I don't expect a high school student to see physics from a quantum perspective, for example. What I'll do is break this down class by class, since I didn't look at the classes as interchangeable, I had specific views on each.

Math: Math was by far our most competitive class and almost all my "smart" friends were going to be taking university programs which are heavy in math: engineering (which is what I'm doing), sciences, and finance/business. I'll focus mainly on calculus, since it was the most recent and most relevant. Now as I alluded to, you could ace calculus and not really understand what was going on. But I feel I did understand it, which is why I made the transition to university calculus a lot easier than most people at my university (I go to one of Canada's top 3 universities, but I don't want to reveal more than that).

There are two ways to approach high school math. Memorize algorithm or have an understanding of how the concepts work and then use that understanding to solve any question thrown at you. I always would try for the latter. But this never required me to study much, just pay enough attention in class that I can hear him explain the central concept and you can ignore the rest. For example, differentiating a function with respect to x is just finding it's rate of change with respect to x or the tangent line to the curve. But the difference is some people know those words, other know how that can be useful. You don't need to study to understand the importance of that, you need to think about it. The people who study, would do 50 questions out of the book, while never thinking about why they had to do it. This is why I considered their knowledge very superficial and felt it diminished their accomplishments. This is why the class struggled so much on differentiation word problems. You can't memorize every scenario (except the teacher set it up so you could). For me, I'd skim over the questions and just think about how to solve it.

Now in Calculus II, I do practice problems. Not because the underlying concepts are harder, but because the questions really require you to be able to problem solve. And this builds a universal skill, seeing how information you know applies to random scenarios. Applying the chain rule 50 times teaches you to be a robot.

I'm sorry if you've never done calculus, that may have been a bit difficult to follow.

Physics/Chemistry: I'll group these together since my perspective was basically the same. So it's already been established I had no problem with any of the math in high school, but these classes were more about understanding the science. Or at least, that's what they should have been. But in reality, most of the people in these classes just learned to manipulate formulas through answering a bunch of questions. I would just do the required questions (these had to be handed in, so I did the bare minimum), but I'd make sure everything I did made sense to me. And if you take your knowledge of the world, what you did back in middle school, and a formula sheet you can make a lot of deductions on your own about why things should be done a certain way in science. High school physics and chemistry is very intuitive, in other words, so long as you choose to make it that way. To go off on a quick tangent, I feel like the fact that most people have such a bad understanding of math is why they find these classes so difficult at a high school level, because the concepts aren't that complex. I'll give an example. When we did our chapter on torque, lots of people struggled. The formula for torque is simple T = F*r*sin(theta). Assuming you know trigonometry, you'd realize this is a very intuitive formula. Just observe the world around you and you'll realize that any question involving torque can be solved by just understanding the world around you and the mathematical language it's in. But most people don't do that. They see a bar on a piece of paper as something completely removed from reality. And they just beat those questions into their brain until they can get a high test score.

Now, however, in university the physics of electricity is less intuitive. Intuition can still get you far (albeit, it's more abstract since we don't observe it in the same way we do mechanics), but you might need to spend some extra time to really understand the concepts. But on the other hand, my other physics class is basically high school physics with calculus. To me, this class is really easy. It's the same thing just looking at it from a calculus perspective (and I made a lot of these connections on my own while learning calculus), but a lot of people are struggling. Again, they either can't see the reality behind physics or have trouble putting in mathematical terms.

English: My abilities in English were developed growing up reading, writing, etc. But since my English classes were really literature heavy, it was just assumed you were a good writer. I'll keep this more brief. If you want to be good at analyzing poems, don't feel like you must just analyze 50 poems. Read about whatever interests you in life. Read about psychology. Watch movies. Just broaden your horizon of the world and you can "crack the code" presented in a lot of English literature.

Social Studies: I really liked these classes, since I've read about history for fun since a young age and just enjoy learning about things people do. So, I did have an advantage going in. However, for me, it was never about memorizing dates and shit like that (my school was good for not making socials a pure memorization course). For me, it was just seeing how humans act. I didn't need to memorize every battle and like I said it wasn't expected. Plus using your knowledge of life around you, you could make a lot of deductions for a social studies multiple choice test. So yeah, my understanding in these courses was arguably incomplete since I didn't focus on the detailed history of things I wasn't interested in.

Japanese: This was my second language course and it was the hardest for me. By watching anime and playing video games with English subtitles, I was able to somewhat understand the sentence structure going in and pick up some basic vocabulary. But since most of the words very rarely have European roots I couldn't make many deductions regarding vocabulary. That's why from Japanese 9-11 I got progressively worse, just soon got overloaded with vocabulary. Barely made an A in Japanese 11.

Biology: This class was a nightmare for me. Unlike social studies, this class stressed details heavily. It didn't help I had a really bad relationship with this teacher (he in general didn't like the people in my group). I relied way too heavily on intuition about the body in this class and made very little effort to memorize the names of the shit inside the systems. The only reason I made an A in this was because some of the tests I did study quite a bit, because I had tests where I was getting Cs. I won't elaborate on this too much, but what I was able to do really good in was evolution and genetics.

So, I hope that cleared up my views on these things. I honestly do value learning and spend most of my free time learning about things that interest me. And that's why high school was easy for me. Yet I saw some people studying by just memorizing things to get them through and never felt like they understood why any of it made sense. And the material was so easy that I thought that there's no reason someone should need to study this to do well.

I realize this whole post may seem contradictory to my last, but it's not if you really understand my view on this (which I hope I made clear).
 

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I talked a lot when I was in Kindergarten, but after that I was always quiet. I actually remember being quite angered whenever the other students wouldn't shut the hell up when the teacher told us to be quiet. My biggest problem was that I spaced out and daydreamed a lot, even during college, though I still managed to get good grades for the most part until my third year of college.
 

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I was the quiet achiever at school. That student in the corner getting my work done (then proceeded to draw in my textbook). I did what was required, and handed everything in on time. Pretty much making the habit of doing the work as I knew each year would build on itself (mainly maths/science). Pointless learning something twice.

My friends found it hard to distract me, and thought all I did with my free time was study. Actually I never really studied until my final year. I found the material was quite easy to grasp and I often did well in with little effort. I got a sense (plus what I had heard here and there) students who didn't really know me thought I was 'weird'. Not sure why, maybe because I did my work and cared nothing for both 'drama' that went on in friendship groups or the whole fashion thing (this more so in high school). *shrugs* I was mostly oblivious to this so I wasn't fussed about it.


University has been different. I made a point of being much more outgoing to get myself out of my comfort zone. Met a lot of people and made more effort to catch up for study groups. The content has been much more difficult than school and has required me to study. Also realised I don't have much of an interest in what I have been studying (even though my choice of study is quite practical from a career perspective). I have grown more as a person, and understand it's import to factor in my what I like and don't like career wise. I have also been able to practice better methods for managing my time and to work through what was required when I have no motivation.
 

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So, I hope that cleared up my views on these things. I honestly do value learning and spend most of my free time learning about things that interest me. And that's why high school was easy for me. Yet I saw some people studying by just memorizing things to get them through and never felt like they understood why any of it made sense. And the material was so easy that I thought that there's no reason someone should need to study this to do well.

I realize this whole post may seem contradictory to my last, but it's not if you really understand my view on this (which I hope I made clear).
So your view is that people need to think critically as opposed to just memorizing? If so, I would agree.
 

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A lot of sleep and a lot of reading.

If I had a dollar for every time an instructor told me "You have so much potential. If you would put in some effort you would be an all A student." I would have a couple hundred dollars haha.

I breezed through most all of my classes that didn't involve math but I had no genuine interest in most of my school years. Ocassionally a class I was excited to take would come up and I would apply myself but for the most part I was lazy.

I was raised by a INTP(my grandmother, she has a masters degree) and the fact that I wasn't an all A student was so infuriating to her haha. I had zero desire to achieve highly in school though. I just wanted to learn things that I could actually use and apply in life and most of school teaches nothing like that.
 

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In kindergarten and elementary school I was disruptive and got into a lot of fights with other kids. The only difference was that in kindergarten I didn't tolerate the company of other children very well and prefered to play on my own, while I had some friend in elementary school.

Middle school was hell, it was a difficult period for me, I was always on my own and was pretty aggressive to defend myself from the environment, made of incapable teachers and some classmates who acted like borderline criminals. The lessons were really boring and I almost failed grades 7th and 8th because of lack of dedication to schoolwork and truancy.

High school was way better, for the first time I found a class where I got along with all of the other kids and with almost all of the teachers. I was great at the subjects I found interesting, but I found it really hard to focus on and study subjects I wasn't interested in. As for my behaviour in class, I think I was pretty... normal. I was usually quiet (even when I wasn't paying attention), even though a few times I was reproached because I was talking or laughing too loudly during the lesson. Sometimes I opposed the teachers, but it was never a violent opposition. Most of the times I just let them talk and did things my own way.

Now I'm at my first year in University and I'm doing fine. I'm studying something I'm interested in and I get along with the people and teachers, so everything is good so far.
 
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