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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I had a job interview for an asst. manager position. I was interviewed by 4 people at once, but I felt like there was a lot riding on this interview and the regional manager even asked me if I was nervous toward the beginning of the interview. I recovered and made good case, but I guess it wasn't enough. I just couldn't get passed my nervousness and it cost me the job. I did get feedback so I do know that is the reason.

Does anyone else have this problem and do you have a way to overcome it? I know I'm qualified to manage a store, but interview process brings out some nervous energy.
 

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It's a learned skill.

I used to be nervous in job interviews. Fresh out of college, I knew I wasn't going to get a job in my industry, so I applied to anything that would give me an interview. I used it as practice, even if I didn't want the position. The more I interviewed and the more I got rejected (or not even given callbacks), the more comfortable I got with interviewing.

It mostly helped me gain confidence in my interviewing abilities. Especially since those interviewers are putting on a more professional persona, it's nice to have that confidence of knowing that you can respond to them in a way that you know can earn you their good graces. :p

I had my internship leader critique my interviewing skills and she told me that people want to hear a story out of you and get to know the person behind the resume. After that critique, I viewed interviews as story telling time and it helps make the mood a lot less serious. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do feel like going to interviews for practice helps. I haven't had a lot lately. I just don't want to apply to 50 jobs so I can get 5 interviews just to improve my skills in that area. It's not practical. Of course, you try to get every job you interview for, but I'm thinking more of hiding nerves more than getting rid of them.
 

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To be honest, it would be better to just get rid of it rather than "hiding" it. If you hide it and the pressure is on, there's a good chance it may pop up again at the worst time. I've been there. :p It sucks. But I sucked it up and went on to the next one.

I'm not saying that how I went about it is the best way to do things. Take it as a possible plan of attack. :) When I learned to remove from my mind how much the job means to me and just focus on "I'm qualified, I know I'm cut out for the position," the nerves stop creeping up.

And yes, I know applying to 50 jobs a week to only get 3 interviews isn't practical, but coming from an economy where jobs were so little, having that fierce mentality of just doing what you have to do to get what you want (overcoming your nerves, getting better at interviews, etc), you'll end up doing anything to improve yourself. And it's not just for the sake of "getting good" at interviews, it was gaining complete confidence in myself, which helped with every other aspect of my life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
To be honest, it would be better to just get rid of it rather than "hiding" it. If you hide it and the pressure is on, there's a good chance it may pop up again at the worst time. I've been there. :p It sucks. But I sucked it up and went on to the next one.
I'm just saying that because I really have no idea when or why I get nervous sometimes and I'm not at other times so I want to be able to perform even though I'm nervous. That is the discouraging part. If I had the interview tomorrow instead of today my demeanor may have been completely different. If I'm nervous though it always shows. I don't know if it is an ENFP thing or not, but that is the case with me.
 

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It's a learned skill.

I used to be nervous in job interviews. Fresh out of college, I knew I wasn't going to get a job in my industry, so I applied to anything that would give me an interview. I used it as practice, even if I didn't want the position. The more I interviewed and the more I got rejected (or not even given callbacks), the more comfortable I got with interviewing.
That's clever. Pizal you sound sceptical about this as a practical idea, but trust me this is really good advice if you want to help yourself. even applying for a bunch and purposefully failing would be a good way to get rid of the nerves. i know it seems more logical to heap pressure on yourself for an interview, but really, particularly with us, it works the other way around- we should try to care a little less to be relaxed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's clever. Pizal you sound sceptical about this as a practical idea, but trust me this is really good advice if you want to help yourself. even applying for a bunch and purposefully failing would be a good way to get rid of the nerves. i know it seems more logical to heap pressure on yourself for an interview, but really, particularly with us, it works the other way around- we should try to care a little less to be relaxed.
Well I just want to think through it. I'm not trying to be contentious. I don't try to heap pressure on myself in an interview, but it just sorta happens naturally based on the situation. Once I got passed the initial nerves I was fine, but it was too late for the interviewer. I do agree that it works and that it is good advice. I've done it before. I thought there might be a quick fix which there probably isn't.
 

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Fresh out of college, I knew I wasn't going to get a job in my industry, so I applied to anything that would give me an interview. I used it as practice, even if I didn't want the position.
The problem with this approach is that it can be agonizing for those of us who are sensitive to the fact that organizations pour real time and money into the interviewing process. Going in knowing that I'm not interested in the position leads to me feeling like a deceptive and destructive drain on resources, actually making me more anxious in the process and slowing down my job-hunting as a whole.

Practice is definitely a boon in the realms where I've conquered anxiety, but I think we have to be mindful of trampling our value system when we hunt for it. From my experience with interviewing, I need to have a case for a job made up in my mind beforehand, or at least jump into interviews early and impulsively while I still have flow and haven't really had the time to analyze. Otherwise, I'll wind up a nervous and regretful for who-knows-how-long due to having betrayed the part of my Fi that tells me not to knowingly waste people's time or take what wasn't given.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The problem with this approach is that it can be agonizing for those of us who are sensitive to the fact that organizations pour real time and money into the interviewing process. Going in knowing that I'm not interested in the position leads to me feeling like a deceptive and destructive drain on resources, actually making me more anxious in the process and slowing down my job-hunting as a whole.

Practice is definitely a boon in the realms where I've conquered anxiety, but I think we have to be mindful of trampling our value system when we hunt for it. From my experience with interviewing, I need to have a case for a job made up in my mind beforehand, or at least jump into interviews early and impulsively while I still have flow and haven't really had the time to analyze. Otherwise, I'll wind up a nervous and regretful for who-knows-how-long due to having betrayed the part of my Fi that tells me not to knowingly waste people's time or take what wasn't given.
I basically used Wal-Mart interviews like this earlier this year. They ask good questions even for low level employees. I did feel a little guilty for doing it, but I did end up taking a temp job with them which I quit because my wife found a better job in a different city. I want to be a resource to whoever I work for. I didn't feel all that guilty because Wal-Mart is evil. The thing is a lot of good people work there too.
 

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I basically used Wal-Mart interviews like this earlier this year. They ask good questions even for low level employees. I did feel a little guilty for doing it, but I did end up taking a temp job with them which I quit because my wife found a better job in a different city. I want to be a resource to whoever I work for. I didn't feel all that guilty because Wal-Mart is evil. The thing is a lot of good people work there too.
Ah, fair enough. Knowing myself, I couldn't have written off Walmart's needs any differently than any other company's. An organization of people is an organization of people regardless, and I'd still only see it as draining a real person's time and resources if my mind was made-up against it going in. (That said, you at least had some idealism towards the position, seeing as you tried it out!)

Really, I know I'd get more strength for job-hunting from knowing that I was operating at 100% and acting up to my usual standard of discretion. Nerves strike me the hardest when I feel like I'm operating mindlessly or "off my game".
 
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