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Hello. I am 16 years old, meaning I haven't come too far in my education. All the physics, chemistry and biology I have learned so far have been very basic and had nothing to do with mathematics.

I am wondering, how do I find the right science branch for me to learn. I am sure I want to work with science, because of its' problemsolving nature and I would just find everything else boring.

Should I look actively for something that can entertain me as a hobby, and if so, how?
Do I just wait until I get into more advanced courses (will take a few years, and I can't wait to be honest)?
 

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I'm sorry I can't give you any concrete advice as I have no insight into the educational options available to you.

But if the choice were up to me, I'd go for physics - and more specifically, quantum mechanics. The subject matter is absolutely fascinating in itself, but I admit that for a while now I've been hooked by the enthusiasm of the inspired and inspiring physicist that was Richard Feynman :proud:

Feynman 'Fun to Imagine' 1: Jiggling Atoms
 

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But if the choice were up to me, I'd go for physics - and more specifically, quantum mechanics. The subject matter is absolutely fascinating in itself, but I admit that for a while now I've been hooked by the enthusiasm of the inspired and inspiring physicist that was Richard Feynman :proud:
I have no more to add, since nyn stole my thoughts on the matter.
Thief!

:tongue:
 
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Well, maybe if nothing in your science classes has made you "tick" yet, then science isn't for you?
I know you said that you'd find anything else boring since you are attracted to the problem-solving part of science, but there is a lot of problem-solving in other areas too - they're just based on different systems.

Otherwise I'd suggest studying on your own the subjects you think you could be interested in, a few good books and Internet should be enough to do so more in depth than in school. And if you still can't get hooked on anything in particular, well you're 16, you still have plenty of time to figure it out eventually :happy:
 

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It doesn't matter. I studied physics, did a mathy PhD, and now work in finance. Physics is broad though, might be a good choice.
 

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when you go to sleep at night what are you most likely to contemplate about before dozing off?
a) viruses and bacteria
b) double and triple bonds
c) gravity and black holes
this should point you in the right direction :tongue:

on a more serious note I think you should try to get a job/internship in areas you're interested in and take a few more courses - to me it was pretty clear which of the 3 science areas i liked the most when i was in school
 

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To me, there is not a specific "branch of science". Physics, Chemistry and Biology are just subjects that deal with studying objects of interest at different levels (Physics: Quantum and Atomic, Chemistry: Molecules, and Biology: Macromolecular, Organisms, and Ecosystems). To me their not really different, just their level of observation.

I see you said you like problem solving. I call that truth seeking, something that all scientists wish to find, the truth. However, I do strongly believe that truth doesn't exclusively exist in the world of traditional world of science (physics, chemistry, and biology). My intention is to say that you shouldn't pick physics, chemistry, and biology solely because you think it is the absolute solution to the world or that they are widely accepted studies. Pick what you have interests in the most. If you are unsure because you're mind is interested in all, then I must say you either specialize and pick one or are extremely gift because you'd then have to train yourself in all the "branches."

Also, your potential is not dictated by what "branch of science" you choose. Sorry for my individual philosophy, but I hope you can understand my tangents.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I see. st0831, I have thought about it the same way, but when I was a kid I really enjoyed science. Since I was three I read a lot of books but school has kind of discouraged me.

I read up on quantum mechanics and it seems interesting. Now I have a motivation to study aswell.
 

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Hello. I am 16 years old, meaning I haven't come too far in my education. All the physics, chemistry and biology I have learned so far have been very basic and had nothing to do with mathematics.

I am wondering, how do I find the right science branch for me to learn. I am sure I want to work with science, because of its' problemsolving nature and I would just find everything else boring.

Should I look actively for something that can entertain me as a hobby, and if so, how?
Do I just wait until I get into more advanced courses (will take a few years, and I can't wait to be honest)?
I once gave advice to a 16 year-old high school student that turned out to be really good advice. If you can, try to enroll in a class at a local community college. Not only will the environment be more stimulating than high school, but you'll also be earning college credit. There are a few hurdles, but if your parent(s) are behind it, then that's a big plus.

I'm not sure what kind of learner you are, but one other thing you might want to check into is your local library's video/DVD collection. They may have some documentaries/science programs. Other than just awesome input, you might begin to find something that clicks.

Good luck! Don't be discouraged by being 16 or being in a hurry to learn. Both are great!
 
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Discussion Starter #11
So I have been looking at a few documentaries and read different wikipedia pages and now I don't even know where to start.

Really enthusiastic now, thank you for the advice.
 
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