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ISxP 5
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Not really familiar in this place, but there most likely are people here who can draw wonderful things.

I would like to know how I can get better in drawing.
I drew a bit last week, but I really seem to suck at it. I sucked at it on school aswell. I would like to become better at it.
I kinda feel like I can put alot of emotions in my drawings and that it could be an outlet for me.

Could anyone here give tips? Or perhaps link a tutorial or whatsoever that you think is useful to me?

Greatly appreciated.
 

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ISFJ
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Not really familiar in this place, but there most likely are people here who can draw wonderful things.

I would like to know how I can get better in drawing.
I drew a bit last week, but I really seem to suck at it. I sucked at it on school aswell. I would like to become better at it.
I kinda feel like I can put alot of emotions in my drawings and that it could be an outlet for me.

Could anyone here give tips? Or perhaps link a tutorial or whatsoever that you think is useful to me?

Greatly appreciated.
there's a book called drawing on the right side of the brain. that has helped me a lot get better at drawing. there's exercises in it that help to train your eye and stuff. there's also a video called how to draw the marvel way. i think that is helpful too for drawing figures no matter if you choose to exaggerate their features or not.
 

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exploring space
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I wanna get better too, but I'm never consistent. One thing I've learned that makes a difference and it's pretty much a 1st step, is to focus on the lines. Seeing things as lines rather than full shapes, you focus on each line draw it and move on until you have the whole thing. It's more of a perspective - altering advice rather than technique and it blew my mind the first time I tried it.
 

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Practice, practice, practice!

Also, try drawing what you see, not what your brain tells you you see. Think about the perspective you are looking at the object from, and that should help. And take your time—you can't rush art and expect it to be good!
 

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Not really familiar in this place, but there most likely are people here who can draw wonderful things.

I would like to know how I can get better in drawing.
I drew a bit last week, but I really seem to suck at it. I sucked at it on school aswell. I would like to become better at it.
I kinda feel like I can put alot of emotions in my drawings and that it could be an outlet for me.

Could anyone here give tips? Or perhaps link a tutorial or whatsoever that you think is useful to me?

Greatly appreciated.
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there's a book called drawing on the right side of the brain. that has helped me a lot get better at drawing.
^^^ What she said. That's a great book.

Another one I highly recommend:
https://www.amazon.com/Artists-Complete-Guide-Facial-Expression/dp/0823004325
^^^This book right here was a game-changer for me.

Another thing to note is, drawing isn't as hard as you think it is. If you can write your name legibly, you can draw. You already have the ability; it's really just about training your brain to transfer what's actually there onto paper rather than what it thinks it sees (assuming you aren't just doing stylistic seat-of-your-pants mod stuff).
 

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As far as just telling you what you can do right off the bat to improve overall without having to buy a book...

1. Learn proportions and ratios and study them. Facial proportions, body proportions, proportions of whatever it is you're planning to draw. Study muscle structure, skeletal structure, and the structure of anything else you plan to draw. Knowing what's underneath effects what you draw on top of it.

2. Practice both line drawing and shade drawing.
Examples:
(Notice minimal shading, pretty much just all lines.)


And...
(Notice the minimal lines; everything is defined by the shading. In heavily shaded drawings like this, think of your eraser as a tool equally important to your pencil. You will be using it almost as much!)


Doing the shading and line exercises separately will help you understand the effects they both create and will help you balanced them out when you use them together.

 

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i think the more you observe it and the more you do it the better you become at it. If you just keep doing it, your visual aesthetic naturally becomes sharper in my opinion, and you can identify discrepancies and proportions easier, like your brain just starts understanding it more and more or something.

Another way I do is to look at things done by others which I like/am inspired by and mentally try to figure out, how did they do that...
(if not watch an actual tutorial XD)
 

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I recently learnt about one-, two-, and three-point perspectives, which really felt like the biggest missing puzzlepiece for me, with helplines etc, vanishingpoints. Even if not always using helplines it seems really useful to have them in mind if trying to make something fairly realistic. So that is a tip in case you are not yet familiar with it, from a fellow amateur.
 

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Not really familiar in this place, but there most likely are people here who can draw wonderful things.

I would like to know how I can get better in drawing.
I drew a bit last week, but I really seem to suck at it. I sucked at it on school aswell. I would like to become better at it.
I kinda feel like I can put alot of emotions in my drawings and that it could be an outlet for me.

Could anyone here give tips? Or perhaps link a tutorial or whatsoever that you think is useful to me?

Greatly appreciated.
1) Find work that you really like and copy it (without tracing). This will help you gain control and get a feel for how to translate what you see without worrying about how you want to interpret a subject (since it has already been done for you). It will also help you understand how an artist thinks from a technical perspective, and stimulate your imagination as you explore other artists' work.

2) Try drawing the same subject more than once, and practice looking more than drawing. Even if you are translating a three dimensional object into 2-d space, gettting to know you subject from all angles is going to help you interpret it from one angle.

3) Get in the habit of not erasing - not because every line is perfect, but to force yourself to think before putting a mark down, and so you can see your own process. Don't be afraid to mess up. Not every drawing has to be complete, exactly what you want, or even presentable.

4) Keep a sketchbook and draw all the time.

Everyone's method is different, but this is what I have learned about developing my skill at drawing.
 

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Good structure leads to good drawing. You should focus on being able to draw things accurately in three dimensions. Like anything else, you gotta do it frequently and consistently.

Also, do not get myopic with your drawings. That is, focusing on points of detail over the big picture. A drawing with really believable solid structure is a lot more important overall.

When I draw, I'm very fast and loose at first, and I almost always use references. Often I conglomerate references together to make unique drawings rather than copying one.

And final piece of advice: steal, copy, replicate, until you get the basics down. Don't do this crap that some hack artists do and stick to poorly structured drawing and claim it's just stylistic, when it's really a crutch for just sucking at it. Actually learn to draw and then do more expressionistic stuff later if you want.
 

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I found that Marc Holmes book “The Urban Sketcher” was what really helped me. And then I found visual note taking and I use that to practice with my work notes every day.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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- Draw from life! It helps you gain a better understanding of shapes and how lighting works. So yeah draw objects around you even if it might be a bit boring.
- Use a pen to draw. It stops you from erasing every little mistake so you're more focused on the general flow
- If you want to learn how to draw people, I recommend drilling down anatomy first before developing your own style.
- Practice every day and you'll definitely improve
 

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EvilShoutyRudolph
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@Satan_Claus

I'm going to go by the philosophy that my art teacher this year has taught us.

Use grids. This is how you get accurate drawings. Just printout an image that you've added grids on, and then draw some grids on a piece of paper. Then just try drawing an accurate replica of your source image.

Also, drawing things upside down. It's been found that it helps out with drawing.

These usually only work if you're doing observational drawings(such as drawing an image you found online, or drawing something right I'm front of you), but not so well if you are trying draw something from your imagination.

But it still works.
 

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Not really familiar in this place, but there most likely are people here who can draw wonderful things.

I would like to know how I can get better in drawing.
I drew a bit last week, but I really seem to suck at it. I sucked at it on school aswell. I would like to become better at it.
I kinda feel like I can put alot of emotions in my drawings and that it could be an outlet for me.

Could anyone here give tips? Or perhaps link a tutorial or whatsoever that you think is useful to me?

Greatly appreciated.
I have an idea!
If you want, you could upload your drawings here and we could keep track of your progress.
That way, every time you draw, you'll give it your all and you'll be motivated to improve on the next drawing.
What do you say?
Yes?
GREAT!
In 6 months we should see some awesome changes.
 

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Blind contour drawing exercises can help train hand-eye coordination as well as help you to go slow and really looking at objects in detail. [video=youtube;x0zl5NnEAyU]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKHVqbM_xLU[/url] Doing a quick gesture drawing before you start placing permanent lines down can greatly improve the ratios/structure of the drawing. Gesture drawings are supposed to be quick and dirty, and you can easily tell when your placement is off so you can fix it without losing a lot of work. Loosen up your arm and do nice broad lines when gesture drawing. Focus on the general shapes and placement, sometimes it helps to defocus your vision and compare your gesture drawing to the real thing. [video=youtube;QSpLMzJNSJ4]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNzVKD2UNiQ[/url] When you have a gesture drawing, you can lightly sketch in a more detailed image. And then when you have it the way you want it to look, you can next work on line quality and weight. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSp...//www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0zl5NnEAyU[/video]
 
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