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Stuff it: Millennials nix their parents’ treasures - The Washington Post

For those who don't want to click on the article, the basic idea is that Baby Boomers are downsizing their houses and trying to give up all their saved furniture and treasures away. Many of them are baby clothes or Grandma's stuff and precious to them as memories. Millennials are not ready to accept their old elementary school stuff or the gigantic walnut headboards since they tend to live in smaller spaces and collect memories in digital format.

I found the phenomenon in this article about inheriting the Baby Boomers' knickknacks to be a bit sad, although practical. How do you guys feel about it? Do you dread picking up the detritus of the previous generations or do you embrace it?
 

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When I was small, my parents moved us often from tiny apartment to tiny apartment as their vocations, pastoring and school teaching, forced them to live simply. Except for the silver plate they were loaded up with at their wedding, we typically gave away our furniture each time we moved. Then we started buying old fixer-upper houses and filling them with clunky used furniture bought at yard sales. As my much more prosperous grandparents and great aunts and uncles began to downsize and pass on, my family began collecting all their stuff. The previous generation traveled extensively and collected knickknacks.

These included Italian art, Chinese porcelain, Indian painted screens, hand blown glass, Persian rugs, tapestries, heavy solid furniture, hand painted Christmas ornaments, sewing machines, old chests, paper weights, bottle collections, fairy lamp collections, stamp collections, coin collections, seashell and rock collections, antique dolls, paperweights, music boxes, Lladros, clippings from living bushes transplanted to our yard, and even more silver. We have no less than five sets of china dishware, two of them formal. My brother and I both added more stuff to the mix when we moved back in to save rent while paying off college debt. The house is full to bursting. Haha.

I will plan to move out next year and take my stuff back. But I have mixed feelings on how much of this I would like to inherit, because it requires lots of maintenance to keep clean and protected from air and sunlight. I also have gotten rid of a lot of clutter after packing and unpacking my stuff so many times. I hate it. I'm straddling Gen X and Gen Y, but I'm not sure if this affects anything. I know I prefer rambly country houses and natural wood and stone and artisan crafts to contemporary, trendy or minimalist decor, or the Ikea look. A house with a feeling of permanence and memory is a personal goal because I've moved 17 times in my life, with family often hundreds of miles away.

Do you guys dream of simple small spaces that you can completely make your own? Or do you like to drag a lot of memorabilia with you?
 

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Um ...weeelll...Baby Boomers are classically greedy hoarders, unless they're hippies, so this is probably mostly good. Except for things that are truly heirlooms or photo albums. A lot of Millenials also collect vinyl and have turn tables, so they might keep parents or other relatives records.
 

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When I was small, my parents moved us often from tiny apartment to tiny apartment as their vocations, pastoring and school teaching, forced them to live simply. Except for the silver plate they were loaded up with at their wedding, we typically gave away our furniture each time we moved. Then we started buying old fixer-upper houses and filling them with clunky used furniture bought at yard sales. As my much more prosperous grandparents and great aunts and uncles began to downsize and pass on, my family began collecting all their stuff. The previous generation traveled extensively and collected knickknacks.

These included Italian art, Chinese porcelain, Indian painted screens, hand blown glass, Persian rugs, tapestries, heavy solid furniture, hand painted Christmas ornaments, sewing machines, old chests, paper weights, bottle collections, fairy lamp collections, stamp collections, coin collections, seashell and rock collections, antique dolls, paperweights, music boxes, Lladros, clippings from living bushes transplanted to our yard, and even more silver. We have no less than five sets of china dishware, two of them formal. My brother and I both added more stuff to the mix when we moved back in to save rent while paying off college debt. The house is full to bursting. Haha.

I will plan to move out next year and take my stuff back. But I have mixed feelings on how much of this I would like to inherit, because it requires lots of maintenance to keep clean and protected from air and sunlight. I also have gotten rid of a lot of clutter after packing and unpacking my stuff so many times. I hate it. I'm straddling Gen X and Gen Y, but I'm not sure if this affects anything. I know I prefer rambly country houses and natural wood and stone and artisan crafts to contemporary, trendy or minimalist decor, or the Ikea look. A house with a feeling of permanence and memory is a personal goal because I've moved 17 times in my life, with family often hundreds of miles away.

Do you guys dream of simple small spaces that you can completely make your own? Or do you like to drag a lot of memorabilia with you?
I am almost insanely minimalist, and mostly have been since my late teens. The older I get, the guiltier I feel about resources and space. Many Millenials actually have very sane ethics in this department, there are of course exceptions.

I noticed my SJ boyfriends were unapologetic about wanting more stuff, liking labels, and generally never making a complete break from the excess of their 80s/90s childhood. My ESFJ found it disturbing that I didn't keep more stuff, as he is a collector by his very nature. ISTJ was a weird mix of wanting to have the coolest stuff but being mindful of things like water and paper towels, so he is probably more authentic in being a Millenial SJ, my ESFJ leaned more towards X and actually called himself a throwback. But I could see the status symbols of the 80s entrenched in both of their consciousness which admittedly part of the attraction on my part (I know, sometimes I don't make any sense and am utterly irrational, I'm an SFP for crissakes.)

One thing I'll agree on is not especially liking the Ikea shit, I think that's a fashion trait of younger members of Gen Y, like way younger, though there are even Xers like Moby who originally touted that look all the way back, minimalist urban fashion can be traced to New York in the 90s, though now it seems more 00's San Francisco. I also like natural fibers, natural building materials, and old looking things. I would not mind owning an old school phone or dial tv, but I fit more with the woodsy bearded hipsters.
 

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I really wildly misunderstood what this thread title was about; I was shocked into clicking))
On a serious note, not sure if I'm Gen Y (1994) but I really like having family heirlooms and such around. I wouldn't throw something away if it was important to my parents or grandparents. Even if I just have it in storage it's worth saving so my children can have more of a connection to their grandparents, etc.
 
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