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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to adapt an daily workout routine, where I will do a rather short cardio workout at home, however I have trouble because it still feels tiring and I have to take extra rest every now and often. Not to mention, sometimes I feel like my workout plan wont work and feels like I am wasting time and energy.

How do you keep up and motivated to workout?

This is what I am currently following (I'm skipping the last workout part because I get too tired and I find myself completely out of breath)

I'm 5'5 in height, and last time I weighted I was around 71 kg, not sure if this is considered overweight or not I just look a little bit skinny fat, just small love handless and fat on my thighs, I assume my body fat level is 19% to 22% if I'm not wrong.

Do you guys have any tips?
 
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Not sure if I've understood correctly; seems you're just trying to master one workout. No wonder you're unmotivated.

Try doing different workouts each time. Sounds really boring repeating the same one (even repeating more than once or twice would bore me to tears).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not sure if I've understood correctly; seems you're just trying to master one workout. No wonder you're unmotivated.

Try doing different workouts each time. Sounds really boring repeating the same one (even repeating more than once or twice would bore me to tears).
You sure? Isnt the main thing about workout is consistency?
 

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It's very important to choose workouts for your level of fitness, first of all. Then, if you still can't keep up the pace taking a few breaks is ok. You will eventually develop the endurance and fitness to complete it and then you can move to the next.
Walking outside is always a great choice especially as beginner as u can develop your own pace and learn to challenge yourself based on your needs. For example when I was a very beginner I started walking only 10 mins then increased and can now walk for hours with no prob. At the gym I picked the beginner cardio classes/low impact then moved to harder ones which sometimes required me to adjust into easier movements as the teacher showed and it was fine. And with strength training it's important to lift the appropriate weight, not too much that breaks form and not so little that there's no challenge.
That's my mindset for motivation as well as having a variety of exercises - cardio, muscle, mobility, flexibility and various movements for each. Most of all is to focus on how great it feels after, which happens when you workout at the appropriate level.
 

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The key is to find consistency within flexibility. I've been working out 3 - 4 times a week for a few years but I've never made it to stick to one routine. In fact, I can follow a workout plan for a few weeks and then I have to switch to a new routine with different exercises .

Sure, if you want to reach a specific goal (muscle growth for example) changing routines within a short time won't help you but if you just want to keep yourself in shape you can do whatever feels right.
The lack of motivation often comes from not knowing the best sports for you. It took me forever to figure out that I need a mix of everything, somaybe you haven't found what you need.
 

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Take my two cents or not, idc. But you should scale the exercises that you're having trouble with until you can do them comfortably and feel like you need to be challenged.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's very important to choose workouts for your level of fitness, first of all. Then, if you still can't keep up the pace taking a few breaks is ok. You will eventually develop the endurance and fitness to complete it and then you can move to the next.
Walking outside is always a great choice especially as beginner as u can develop your own pace and learn to challenge yourself based on your needs. For example when I was a very beginner I started walking only 10 mins then increased and can now walk for hours with no prob. At the gym I picked the beginner cardio classes/low impact then moved to harder ones which sometimes required me to adjust into easier movements as the teacher showed and it was fine. And with strength training it's important to lift the appropriate weight, not too much that breaks form and not so little that there's no challenge.
That's my mindset for motivation as well as having a variety of exercises - cardio, muscle, mobility, flexibility and various movements for each. Most of all is to focus on how great it feels after, which happens when you workout at the appropriate level.
Alright, so how much a week you exercies? When you just started (Beginner), how much days a week you went outside for a walk for 10 mins as you say, when you are a beginner you did something more in addition to the 10 min walking outside?
 

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Exercise tips are great, but it doesn’t do much if you lose interest half way through (which is something I struggle with). If you’re looking to just stay consistent, then I think the largest hurdle to overcome is expectations. If you’re expecting results in a short time frame, it’s only going to result in disappointment.

So try to readjust your expectations. Focus on your brain first. My suggestion: treat it like having a shower every morning. When you take a shower, do you do it solely to be clean to make your skin look healthier and more hygienic? You might, but that takes time and doesn’t happen overnight. Instead, most people take a shower in the mornings because it simply makes them feel better and more awake. They notice the immediate small benefit, and include it into their daily routines because of it. Eventually, the long-term beneficial effects come into play as a result of that.

Try to treat exercise in a similar vein. If you exercise in the morning (which I recommend) do it because of the boost to your mood before the day starts (like a shower) and the other smaller benefits. Eventually, you’ll just naturally add it to your daily routine. Then you’ll notice the differences before you know it. But focus on the smaller tangible benefits, it makes it easier to justify spending the time in your day.
 
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Alright, so how much a week you exercies? When you just started (Beginner), how much days a week you went outside for a walk for 10 mins as you say, when you are a beginner you did something more in addition to the 10 min walking outside?
I started with 10 mins and then increased as I felt I could do more. I think it was 3 times a week at least + more if I felt up to it. When I returned home I stretched my legs a little and that's all I did yea. I should have been stretching my back too, in hindsight, but didn't know better back then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I started with 10 mins and then increased as I felt I could do more. I think it was 3 times a week at least + more if I felt up to it. When I returned home I stretched my legs a little and that's all I did yea. I should have been stretching my back too, in hindsight, but didn't know better back then.
What do you actualy suggest for a beginner workout then?
 

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I didn't watch the video, but at first glance it seems like a challenging workout -- perhaps not appropriate for someone who isn't very motivated. Why did you choose this one?

Anyway, here are my thoughts on staying motivated.

1. There are many kinds of exercise, from yoga to cycling to weight training. Choose things you actually enjoy. You might find motivation in a good playlist, or a workout buddy, or competition. If you don't like it, you won't do it, and if you don't do it, it won't make you fit.

2. Modify things that are too hard. Do an easier version (e.g., girl pushups), or do fewer reps, or whatever it takes. Concentrate on good form so you don't injure yourself. Work your way up to the hardcore version (if it is attainable).

3. If you get breathless or can't finish the workout, be patient. You will improve, maybe faster than you think. Give it 2 weeks and see how you feel then.

4. Do mix it up, so you don't get bored. For me, boredom is the enemy. I need a certain amount if variety; you might need a different amount.

4. Examine your reasons for doing this. Do you want to be healthy for life, or change your appearance within 2 months, or have a fun workout? Or something else? Ask yourself whether it's a realistic goal, and how badly you want it. I was crippled, and a certain activity enabled me to walk, so I'm motivated to do that.

5. Develop a realistic schedule that you can stick to. Again, if you don't do it, it won't work. I used to do 2.5 hours daily, of cardio and weights. I got great results but burnt out after a few months. Now, I do 1.5 hours most days (of fun, nonstrenuous exercises) because this is sustainable for me. For you, it might be 3 short but hard workouts per week.

6. If you miss a workout -- or even a week or a month of workouts -- don't worry about it. Just pick up where you left off.

I've done many kinds of exercises and had different routines over the years. It's a moving target. Try different things and don't give up. Good luck.
 

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What do you actualy suggest for a beginner workout then?
prob the same as I did but with whatever limits are suited to you - walking and adjusting time or effort based on your needs and ability. You don't want it to feel like taking a stroll but you shouldn't start panting. That's a general rule for exercise: if you start panting you are doing too much, in a negative way. There is a sweet spot where breathing is fast but comfortable, and it feels like if you go harder you'll start being out of breath - that's where you wanna be for aerobic improvement, and adjust your pace/effort as needed to remain in that zone and not go out of breath.

if you want to do a workout at home you can find on youtube beginner low impact aerobics or beginner bodyweight exercises for strength training and see how they go

I know it might feel that you are not doing much because of all those intense vids online but that's the only way to get fit - you have to do things that are suitable to your level and challenge you just enough that you can progress. Trying to do things way outside your capabilities are likely to feel awful, discourage, and even harm you. Besides, improving aerobic endurance is dependent on a prolonged moderate level of effort so doing short workouts for it won't cut it as it turns into a strength workout really, it's a matter of heart rate and slow release of energy to keep you going.
 

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If I work out I look better and I can wear what I like. If I don't work out I start to look either really thin or I start to get overweight. I don't really like those looks on me. I also prefer to wear sexy clothes most of the time, so that pretty much only works when working out on a regular basis. Another thing is that it has become a safe routine for me now. My life can fall apart, but I will still be able to pay those 20€ a month and work out at least once a week. It's also helpful for me to think about the alternatives. The alternative would most likely be sitting in front of some screen. But I do that enough anyways. I try to not look at my phone while working out and I try to get into my body. That's very peaceful and relaxing. My mind can just be a very stressful place sometimes. I'm constantly thinking so fucking much and those thoughts are usually complicated and exhausting. I either psychoanalyze myself, friends, society or the whole world. I gotta dig deeper and deeper and deeper and I gotta see all the perspectives. It's almost like a compulsion at times and it doesn't stop. I'm also diagnosed with ADHD, so that might also be part of that aside from Fi/Ne. So activating that Si is just very, very healthy for me. But also incredibly difficult.
 

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Food inclusive of meat, otherwise I get tired.

I love eating fruits after running or exercise, when I have a craving for them, such as apples.

Taking a rest day in-between the exercise days, or replace exercise with walking and stretching.

Always stretch and aim to improve your stretch abilities and core muscles.

Try to couple exercise with nature, sunshine, and if possible, a friend or two.

Put some music that's fun to exercise on.

Picture yourself as your favorite awesome sportsy character from a tv show, animated series, movie, etc. and imagine you want to be like them or how you can be like them in terms of physical form!

Volunteer or work somewhere where a "workout" is coupled with helping out, like in ecology where you need to do some tree popping, cleaning hedges, moving rocks, pulling weeds, etc.
 

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What do you actualy suggest for a beginner workout then?
Do you have access to dumbbells? You could try starting out with something like this:


And if you need a help guide of sorts for proper posture, movement and stuff, try searching for the exercise using a site like:

 

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What helps for me is to reinforce the knowledge that it's a long term game, and not place the bar too high. There's no perfect routine... Just make sure it's a routine and not a temporary habit. You don't have to spend a lot of time working out either, as long as you keep doing it at regular intervals. I've made the mistake in the past to start off very enthousiastically, training at a pace that didn't turn out to be sustainable so I didn't last longer than a few months. That isn't enough to really start reaping the benefits, but by that time I was getting burnt out. Try to find the sweet spot where you can still challenge yourself, without pushing yourself so hard that you develop an aversion. Whatever lets you maintain your routine over longer periods of time.
 

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My advice: Play basketball. Motivation is improving your technique, then it’s your game. Start playing street ball, competitive basketball, make friends, and the goalposts are there. Go play to improve or just for fun, and your daily dose of exercise. Hit the gym to help improve your game (your muscles used for basketball; they’re easy exercises), or look good naked; you don’t need it often.
 
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