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INFPs: Which top TWO ways do you learn best?


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MOTM Dec 2011
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How do you learn best?

People are said to learn in different ways.

Answer the poll your top 2 ways of learning in an academic setting. You may like all of them, but which two seem most vital to your learning. If the poll does not include a way you see yourself learning, please elaborate in your post.

Here are some basic descriptions of each type (if you're not sure). Some of these overlap a little of course. If you see them defined differently, then feel free to say so :tongue: . I did not choose the typical "multiple intelligences" because I think interpersonal is greatly related to interacting with people verbally, and I think intrapersonal is really a form of critical analysis.

Visual - See it, draw it, visualize it, color it, mind-map it, symbolize it
Pictures help you store ideas better, making it easier to grasp and remember. In history, a timeline may help. In math, you may need to draw a diagram of sorts to solve a problem. In English, you may visualize the stories in literature & recall the image later when writing an essay. In science, a chart may help. The visuals do not need to be literal though, but some kind of visual will instill the concept in your mind better than just words do. You may create these visuals yourself, mentally. Observing someone else do something can be enough to figure it out for yourself later.

Hands-on - Act it out, build it, touch it, try it yourself
You need to touch something and/or try it yourself to fully grasp it. Listening to someone talk about it, reading about it, or seeing a picture of it does not ingrain its meaning in you. Very abstract concepts may elude you if not connected to something tangible that you can experience. Watching someone else do something may be futile if you can't try it yourself as they do it.

Verbal - Talk about it, listen to it, teach it, discuss it, collaborate on it, interact verbally
You learn well in classes where you can interact with others. When the teacher asks questions, you may like to participate (even if a smaller setting is better because you're shy or whatever). You may find yourself talking outloud when working on homework. You enjoy brainstorming verbally with others.

Musical - Sing it, rap it, play it, hear it, compose it

Setting info to a beat or melody makes it easier for you to remember. ie. "In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue". You may also learn better when you have soothing music on while studying. Rhythm and melody add meaning for you, helping you to grasp a concept bettter.

Reading/writing - Read about it, write about it, think about/analyze it mentally in words
You can read a passage and quickly grasp the points, and you form answers well in writing. However, talking outloud may be harder for you to form your thoughts, and hearing info outloud may be overwhelming. When you remember info, you may picture the words as written in the book. Writing things out helps you remember it.

Critical Analysis - conceptualize it, think critically about it, evaluate it, connect it to another thought
When you learn something new, you need to connect it to something else, analyze it's parts, consider what it means, classify it, compare it. "Dry" info may be easily forgotten if not given personal significance and/or attached to a logical conclusion or process.
 
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I love having a database-like-person to ask info about stuff. If i'm learning spanish then I love to hear something and then ask someone what that means, and then I come up with more questions/possible conclusions.

So basically I love asking questions whenever I want and having someone by my side that knows all the answers so that I don't have to restrict my perceiving by trying to look up an answer in a book.
 

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I like this thread because it made me think hard.

When you remember info, you may picture the words as written in the book
Yep, this is exactly what happened to me when I would answer a question on a test. The way it was written used to pop into my head.

Also use critical analysis a lot to truly learn something. I read a paragraph, try to reflect on it a little bit or a lot depending on the subject, and then might grasp the subject.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I love having a database-like-person to ask info about stuff. If i'm learning spanish then I love to hear something and then ask someone what that means, and then I come up with more questions/possible conclusions.

So basically I love asking questions whenever I want and having someone by my side that knows all the answers so that I don't have to restrict my perceiving by trying to look up an answer in a book.
This sounds "verbal" to me. You like to be engaged in a conversational back & forth, right?

I like brainstorming with people & picking their brains too, but it's not my #1 style. I like all of the learning styles, but visuals & critical analysis seem most important for me to retain info.
 

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If I'm sitting in a class setting, I love listening to debates...ideas being pulled apart, added to, twisted around. If it's facts I'm trying to learn, I like when the teacher can talk a little at length about them, adding human aspects to them and relating to other facts or concepts.
 
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This sounds "verbal" to me. You like to be engaged in a conversational back & forth, right?

I like brainstorming with people & picking their brains too, but it's not my #1 style. I like all of the learning styles, but visuals & critical analysis seem most important for me to retain info.
ahh crap I said other

ahh yea I like visual stuff too. sorry i didn't really think about my answer much
 

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I'm not 100% sure about my learning style, but verbal + visual works best for me.
Without actually seeing something while hearing....something's missing...and without actually hearing something but seeing...something's missing as well...so this is the best combination for me : )
 

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Visual and Critical Analysis!

Visual, mostly because I am Deaf and need to use my eyes (so to speak literally) a lot in communicating and whatnot.

Thanks for posting, OrangeAppled. Love that stuff. Always makes me think.
 

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Very much a hands on learner. That became very evident when I started working. Also visual and musical, but nothing transcends more for me like doing it myself. Really the talking about it is just a waste on me.
 

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Visual - See it, draw it, visualize it, color it, mind-map it, symbolize it
Pictures help you store ideas better, making it easier to grasp and remember. In history, a timeline may help. In math, you may need to draw a diagram of sorts to solve a problem. In English, you may visualize the stories in literature & recall the image later when writing an essay. In science, a chart may help. The visuals do not need to be literal though, but some kind of visual will instill the concept in your mind better than just words do. You may create this visuals yourself, mentally. Observing someone else do something can be enough to figure it out for yourself later.

Hands-on - Act it out, build it, touch it, try it yourself
You need to touch something and/or try it yourself to fully grasp it. Listening to someone talk about it, reading about it, or seeing a picture of it does not ingrain its meaning in you. Very abstract concepts may elude you if not connected to something tangible that you can experience. Watching someone else do something may be futile if you can't try it yourself as they do it.

Critical Analysis - conceptualize it, think critically about it, evaluate it, connect it to another thought
When you learn something new, you need to connect it to something else, analyze it's parts, consider what it means, classify it, compare it. "Dry" info may be easily forgotten if not given personal significance and/or attached to a logical conclusion or process.
Top two would be visual and critical analysis, with verbal coming in at third.

Visual-
I like drawing my own little diagrams to see how things connect. When I was trying to remember concepts for an exam in school, I drew symbols for each one, to remember. It's very important that these pictures, diagrams and symbols, come from my OWN thought processes, otherwise I will forget.

Critical analysis-
It is very important for me to engage with a piece of information on a higher level, otherwise I forget. What is it's significance? how does it fit in with what I already know? what does it really mean? I only ever remember things once I explore their "full" potential.
 

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I find I am very self taught. I learn a lot on my own by myself. My ex girlfriend told me that "you are one of the rare people who can learn something without being taught." So basically I do a lot of my learning by studying outside of class and not always in traditional ways. For example, sometimes I will take what I have learned in class and turned it into a story in my head and explore it that way or I learn it by explaining it to others or applying it to real life.
 

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Visual and Critical Analysis are important to me. Critical Analysis is what really ingrains the information because I need to make it connected to other information, but the visual part is the schematic that allows me to "see" it in my head and put the information in place, like a puzzle.
 

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I am primarily a visual learner, but I also learn by doing things "hands-on" and through critical analysis. However, I enjoy criticism as long there are no personal attacks being brought out to me.
 

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I have read that the 3 "basic" types of learners: visual, auditory, and tactile/kinesthetic. Here is a link to what I'm talking about. You can have a combination of all of them and like MBTI, not all descriptions necessarily fit each person.

I am definitely a tactile/kinesthetic person. If I have someone sit and do something with me and go through the process, I immediately pick it up. Some of the stuff on that list says kinesthetic learners are bad at spelling or that they can learn well with flash cards; neither of those are true for me. I used to do well in spelling bees and flash cards are next to worthless for me. I also definitely can draw from stuff that is useful for visual and auditory learners too. But the best way I learn is getting in and doing something.

I've also found that if I have to read or learn something, that doing something physical helps me pick it up. This is recommended for a lot of tactile learners. So for example if you have to memorize something for a test, getting up and walking around while you keep reading and reciting what you have to memorize can help you remember it better.

The problem is if I'm too afraid to screw something up, I'll sometimes be too hesitant to try on my own without someone there guiding me and making sure I am doing it correctly. More and more I've been working on just jumping in, trusting myself, and risking breaking something to see if I can get it right. Only a few days ago I was able to fix one of the climate controls on my car and I have never tried to work on my car whatsoever before that :laughing:

I suppose from the list above I also am really good with music, especially beats. I'm not so sure I "learn" with critical analysis though I do try to use it for decisions.
 
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