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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As an INTP, I often found myself learning from internal process.

I read, hear, look at ideas, and I practice. Sometimes I found difficulties in listening to instructions.
Which is why I often failed at school in the early years because it involves lots of "listening" and paying attention to our teachers.

Once, I develop a deep sense of interest in the subject, then I began to understand what the teacher is saying. This is why I'm better at self study, but have a low performance in group study (unless I already learn it before).

I can't memorize route by looking at specific signs at the road. I can't do it easily.
I need to read a map first, and internalize the big picture of the map, before I could memorize it.

Is this specific to INTP?
 

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As an INTP, I often found myself learning from internal process.

I read, hear, look at ideas, and I practice. Sometimes I found difficulties in listening to instructions.
Which is why I often failed at school in the early years because it involves lots of "listening" and paying attention to our teachers.

Once, I develop a deep sense of interest in the subject, then I began to understand what the teacher is saying. This is why I'm better at self study, but have a low performance in group study (unless I already learn it before).

I can't memorize route by looking at specific signs at the road. I can't do it easily.
I need to read a map first, and internalize the big picture of the map, before I could memorize it.

Is this specific to INTP?
I don't know if it's INTP specific per se, but what you've described is quite similar to the way I learn. I had a terrible time with instructions as a child, especially ones with multiple steps. I have a poor auditory short-term memory and do better when they are written down.

I also prefer self-study by far. I never really learned much from group projects. I find it very difficult to study in groups too. I have to have quiet to really think and reason, although unless I'm doing something extremely demanding, I'm fine with music in the background.

I also do what you do regarding maps. In navigating I go more by landmarks and the overall terrain rather than specific street names. This makes it a challenge in giving directions to people who need exact street names and distances.
 

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I can't really do verbal instructions. I, for some reason, just cannot learn that way. That's why I've never done good with lectures. Typically, I've gotten only as much as a simple outline from listening to lectures so that I can go in and learn on my own. Oddly, I actually learn best from discussing subjects freely. But I have to be able to add my own part. I also learn well by answering open-ended questions that have to do with whatever subject I'm learning. It has to be something that allows me to think about it in my own way and to find my own way of looking at it.
 

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I learn in a variety of ways. Hearing, seeing, touching, tasting.. there's a beauty to it almost. Internal process is good for gluing together all the facts, of course.
 

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...I found difficulties in listening to instructions.
Which is why I often failed at school in the early years because it involves lots of "listening" and paying attention to our teachers.
...
I can't memorize route by looking at specific signs at the road. I can't do it easily.
I need to read a map first, and internalize the big picture of the map, before I could memorize it.

Is this specific to INTP?
I'm not an INTP but I have same difficulties. People drive me somewhere and then expect me to remember the way there just remembering sequence of turns and landmarks, while I orient by seeing the whole map and also knowing east from west and north from south.

I also have very poor auditory comprehension. Lectures in college have been pretty useless for me. I could never quite pick up on what's going on and resorted to simply spending time channeling material presentation and what prof is saying word by word into my notebook. I prefer to read through material and study on my own. Group study sessions have always been too distracting, only good at final stages when you already know material and just need to iron it out a little.

Pictures help but I am very good at visualizing stuff so they are not necessary. I'm also a random learner afaik, and will skip sequence of chapters in book and sometimes just randomly browse it to see what else is there.

I hate following one textbook chapter by chapter and memorizing material right from it and prefer when the prof ties in some outside extra material to textbook material to make it more relevant.

edit: also forgot to add that I learn really slowly in comparison to other people, but very thoroughly and in depth, and I have read that ISFJs are the same in this respect so this may be dominant Ni/Si thing
 

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I'm not an INTP but I have same difficulties. People drive me somewhere and then expect me to remember the way there just remembering sequence of turns and landmarks, while I orient by seeing the whole map and also knowing east from west and north from south.

I also have very poor auditory comprehension. Lectures in college have been pretty useless for me. I could never quite pick up on what's going on and resorted to simply spending time channeling material presentation and what prof is saying word by word into my notebook. I prefer to read through material and study on my own. Group study sessions have always been too distracting, only good at final stages when you already know material and just need to iron it out a little.

Pictures help but I am very good at visualizing stuff so they are not necessary. I'm also a random learner afaik, and will skip sequence of chapters in book and sometimes just randomly browse it to see what else is there.

I hate following one textbook chapter by chapter and memorizing material right from it and prefer when the prof ties in some outside extra material to textbook material to make it more relevant.

edit: also forgot to add that I learn really slowly in comparison to other people, but very thoroughly and in depth, and I have read that ISFJs are the same in this respect so this may be dominant Ni/Si thing
Some of your posts make me think you're talking about Ne. I didn't think Ni liked to jump around. I know INTJs don't like to jump from topic to topic. Actually, I was explaining Ne to an INTJ friend of mine, recently, and he said it sounded like schizophrenia, and that he doesn't ever really do that. According to this profile, it sounds like INTJs are averse to using Ne.
 

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I learn by practice and example mostly. Like if I want to learn how to use a software, I prefer to practice how to use it first, and then learn the theory later. By this way, I can understand the theory much easier.

My English is awful and I have problems in understanding the grammar. I've read many books but I just don't get it. So I decided to read novels and magazines in English, watch Hollywood movies, and engage myself in many conversations that using English as their main language. My English improves much better with this methods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
To the OP writer: Does your name have anything to do with this question? :happy:
My nickname is nothing serious actually.

It's because of that old sci-fi movie, Johny Mnemonic.

I didn't know anything about mnemonic that day I create my nickname.
I even understand mnemonic as a symbolic instructions in a central processing unit (CPU), before I know about mnemonic as a learning mechanism.

Oh yeah, that mnemonic way of learning by associating things to memorize things doesn't really work for me. It's another effort for my brain to create that association. I often forgot the association.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Some of your posts make me think you're talking about Ne. I didn't think Ni liked to jump around. I know INTJs don't like to jump from topic to topic. Actually, I was explaining Ne to an INTJ friend of mine, recently, and he said it sounded like schizophrenia, and that he doesn't ever really do that. According to this profile, it sounds like INTJs are averse to using Ne.
I also like to jump around. Which sometimes need to be straighten up, or else I couldn't get important things done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I learn by practice and example mostly. Like if I want to learn how to use a software, I prefer to practice how to use it first, and then learn the theory later. By this way, I can understand the theory much easier.

My English is awful and I have problems in understanding the grammar. I've read many books but I just don't get it. So I decided to read novels and magazines in English, watch Hollywood movies, and engage myself in many conversations that using English as their main language. My English improves much better with this methods.
Regarding software, that's similar to most people actually. We are impatient in reading a big book, without getting a feeling of how it works.

But, for me, I often found myself figuring things out by not always listening to instructions. I could listen too though, because computer is the easiest thing for me to handle.
But, I can't do that easily for learning things such as driving a car, or anything else that require most of your motor and physical skills.

I have a period where grammar is difficult. But, it turns out I was just being lazy in not focusing on it. I need a book to learn it. It's hard for me to listen to people instructions / teachings.

Again this is if I haven't learned the subject before learning from others..
 

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I learn best visually. Either directly visual or internally visual, it doesn't really matter. If something can't be "translated" into something that could be "seen", it's not likely to stick very well.

Second to visuals is application. If I can use what I'm learning, I will be able to apply it elsewhere and remember it far longer. That's why I usually prefer to visually preview and then jump into the deep-end on a new subject before covering the basics. It gives me a chance to see where I'm heading and apply it ASAP, then go back and correct the many errors that occurred lol.
 
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In order to learn I need to relate.
Basically...

Si.
 

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Some of your posts make me think you're talking about Ne. I didn't think Ni liked to jump around. I know INTJs don't like to jump from topic to topic. Actually, I was explaining Ne to an INTJ friend of mine, recently, and he said it sounded like schizophrenia, and that he doesn't ever really do that. According to this profile, it sounds like INTJs are averse to using Ne.
I don't think it is Ne but actually F that has something to do with it. Somewhere I read about relation between MBTI type and learning styles. NFs in general prefer a somewhat randomized and holistic learning approach. That INTJs don't jump around but order things sequentially is most likely expression of their Te, as I read Te is a function that structures things linearly, A->B->C and so on. It just pulls everything in one direction and builds up like a chain. Ni-Fe though backed up by Ti, which structures things more like systems with many connections rather than linearly, has a different effect which may resemble Ne I suppose.

Alternatively it may not have anything to do with MBTI type rather with the fact that I am right hemisphere dominant and other INFJs may not be, and so what I have said might not apply to them. I don't think that relation between type and hemisphere dominance has been established yet.
 

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That INTJs don't jump around but order things sequentially is most likely expression of their Te, as I read Te is a function that structures things linearly, A->B->C and so on. It just pulls everything in one direction and builds up like a chain. Ni-Fe though backed up by Ti, which structures things more like systems with many connections rather than linearly, has a different effect which may resemble Ne I suppose.
Yeah, I was coming here to pretty much post that, although not as eloquently.

Ti must be responsible for the random learning. I had been thinking before that Ne was causing the jumping around, but that only creates the possibilities while Ti is actually what links the different topics together, by seeing how they fit together in a logical manner.

For an INFJ, Ni will look at the situation from different angles, and then Ti will link different topics together, which will cause the person to jump from topic to topic as they are linked together by Ti, while more angles are generated by Ni, on the new topic, and repeat. That seems very similar to Ne-Ti, except Ti as a tertiary function would come more in flashes than being consciously used, like an auxiliary.

This must also be why some ISTPs mis-type as INTP, because Ti can put the pieces together, and slightly simulate Ne, which would cause the person to feel intuitive, from the logical patterns they've linked together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I learn best visually. Either directly visual or internally visual, it doesn't really matter. If something can't be "translated" into something that could be "seen", it's not likely to stick very well.

Second to visuals is application. If I can use what I'm learning, I will be able to apply it elsewhere and remember it far longer. That's why I usually prefer to visually preview and then jump into the deep-end on a new subject before covering the basics. It gives me a chance to see where I'm heading and apply it ASAP, then go back and correct the many errors that occurred lol.
As a software developer, I could relate to that.
 

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In all truth, everybody can learn in any form, though some can learn better in different ways. So truly is there such a thing has learning styles? Not really... some ways may be easier for some people than others. That being said, I can learn in many ways: listening, reading, writing, problem solving, activities, etc. And best way to learn: by teaching. Teachers become the mastery learners because they 1. Have to say it out loud, 2. Are applying the information, and 3. Must know it enough so that someone else can understand it.
 

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In all truth, everybody can learn in any form, though some can learn better in different ways. So truly is there such a thing has learning styles? Not really... some ways may be easier for some people than others. That being said, I can learn in many ways: listening, reading, writing, problem solving, activities, etc. And best way to learn: by teaching. Teachers become the mastery learners because they 1. Have to say it out loud, 2. Are applying the information, and 3. Must know it enough so that someone else can understand it.
A person's learning style is the method in which they learn most effectively. It isn't a binary question of will you learn this way or not. The more methods a person is able to use to learn a particular skill/subject, the better they'll learn it, regardless of their preferred learning style.

As a software developer, I could relate to that.
Speaking of software development, one of the things I'd like to do, and think would help me learn even better, is to create educational games/apps as I learn. Taking a physics class? Create a physics-based game as I go. By the end of the class, assuming I have enough free time to code fast enough, I would have a complete physics demo/game showcasing what I learn.

Learn visually --> Apply --> Play + review. Perfect! :laughing:
 

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Double post.
 
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