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I learn best through reflection—basically when I’m given (and when I give myself) adequate time to process information. Also, I learn best when I am personally connected to my work and learning environment. I’m also an effective brainstormer/divergent learner. I’m also stronger in the beginning of the learning process than in the end of it.

Practically, this means that learning through brainstorming, journaling, observing and writing reflective papers. Out of the ways you mentioned, probably reading up on something would work best for me (but it really depends on my interest). Documentaries/practical application/being verbally taught about something depends on what is being conveyed, how it is being conveyed & my connection to the person conveying it... I find that being verbally taught something in a step-by-step manner is actually one of the most difficult ways for me to learn. I’m an effective practical learner if it is something I am passionate about, and if I am to learn it in my own way.

Something I have found helpful in wading through all of this reading up on Kolb’s learning styles. Basically, it’s helpful in determining the way you learn and then giving you practical ways to implement that favoured learning style.
 

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Ideally, through approaching a subject by all of those methods. As many resources and perspectives as possible.
 
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I like to read up on things and try things myself. I don't mind someone showing me their way of doing something but I really don't respond well to someone else instructing me because I like to do things my own way. I would rather make mistakes and learn from them than do that.

Watching other ways and also talking with others are also good learning methods for me.
 

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When on the job (in an engineering office which does many different kinds of jobs) and I am shown for example a software, along with the job requirements, I don't really begin to learn until I'm working alone by myself with the new task.

I then pick it up very quickly with just a few questions which I make a mental note of and I decide later at a good time whether it is still worth asking after having figured out many things on my own.

I like to be independent as much as possible.
 

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A topic of interest overwhelms me so I ask questions, then when I find those answers it leads to a whole new set of questions and hopefully more answers and more questions until I'm convinced I've squeezed every bit of information out of a topic/subject. I'm running out of shit that blows my mind.
 

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During the first week of chemistry class, we had to take this survey (VARK, I believe) to determine how we learn best. I scored as a visual learner, which totally fits my personality since I'm more of an observer than a doer. I learn things best through observing and trying to wrap my head around a process by watching it in action (though I also tend to read up on things if I'm really interested in a topic). I used to be a really kinesthetic learner, but I've grown to hate learning through doing things; I also feel that being preoccupied with instructions and completing tasks takes away from the quality of an observation.

In short, I learn processes and procedures best through observing and subjects best through reading. I do like a challenge where I can learn something for myself, though; in those cases, I like to be alone and think about it for long periods of time.
 

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I like pictures/graphs and trying things for myself. It helps me a lot to write/draw and reorganize/manipulate data to take it in. On the VARK learning styles I'm visual first and kinesthetic closely after. I definitely do best learning by myself. If my friends wanted to meet up for a study group, I would always study first (or later lol), then meet with them!
 

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My thinking is very much visual. Visual, emotional, intuitive and analytical, I think. If there is an emotional motivation strong enough, I will remember very well, either infatuation-like emotions (like recently I "fell in love" with this house and the idea of a life there, and learnt and remembered heaps about it and economical stuff that would otherwise bore me to death and sewagestystems and what not), or anxietydriven emotions (like when my social anxiety was worse, I would remember all and nothing about interactions with people, as some kind of safeguard? keeping vigil, analysing and easily recalling details like a gesture someone did as response to something, that two years later might explain something in combination with this new information...).

I feel almost retarded when it comes to taking instructions verbally, it goes in through one ear and out the other, especially it if concerns numbers, times etc. It just won't stick in my head. When I work in school and have a class by myself I always let the pupils make little signs with their names, cause then I can usually learn 25 names in a day, but if I work "under" a real teacher and can't do that and have to remember from verbal presentation, it will take over a week before I know the names.

Another example of the above is when in university, I did some extra modules in languages (2 hours a week, no homework, have forgotten most of it now...), one year of which was spanish. The first semester we got everything in text first, then practised spoken language, and I did fine. The second semester we had another teacher, who persisted in teaching only verbally, insisting that that was the best way, and for some of the others it seemed to be, but for me, it seemed impossible. At the end of every lesson we got the lesson in text on a paper, and suddenly all that jibberish of the previous two hours seemed so easy. That sememster I barely passed the test.

Strangely enough, I am not very good at processing large amounts of text. Academic studies was hard on me in that aspect, it simply took more hours than I had to read everything. I read very slowly. I like smaller pieces of text, and some pictures to stick the information to. Even when I think myself, I like to have something visual to stick the thoughts to, so that I can have more than one at a time, and easily pick them up again.

I like to learn broadly and throw in heaps of information into "the tumble dryer", as I think of it, all of it might not be so relevant, but eventually it spits out stuff. That is the intuitive part, then I might use a more analytical thinking to test those ideas or thoughts.
 

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Depends on the learning situation and context. If I have to learn a 'practical' skill, I'd rather have someone walk me through a 'hands-on' approach and then supervise me to make sure I'm doing things right. If I have to learn an abstract concept in academia, I'd rather be given reading materials and time to reflect. I'm not good with verbal explanations in academia: there's no 'pause' button whenever I want to reflect on an interesting tangent at my own leisure, and presentations tend to move very quickly. I prefer to express my reflections in writing because I can keep track of my thought processes that way. IMO, speech tends to be more elusive and circumlocutory in many cases, and it's harder for my reflections to mentally 'cohere' in verbal delivery.
 

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I is audio and verbal learner. In case ya didn't know.
 

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I'll tell you a way that I DO NOT learn, the spoken word. I hate lectures and taking notes. I hated school so much. The drill. The memorization. The CONFINEMENT.

Yes. Silence is a absolute must. No music of any kind, no talking, no distractions. I learn by my eyes. Reading, manuals, pictures, movies. I love bouncing from one Learning Cloud to another,but sorry to say, only those things that interest me. BTW, there is a fantastic article I was reading last night about gifted children and how they learn. It's in The Sun, thesunmagazine.org "Beyond Their Years -Linda Kreger Silverman On Understanding Gifted Children". And also one of the best articles I've read about a mother who puts her gifted -- and highly imaginative and years beyond her peers and most adults -- child on Concerta. "Almost Unendurable Beauty" by Jocelyn Evie.
 

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I'm more of a visual learner. Sometimes I will want to learn and do things myself but i'm more visual.

I find that with learning verbally is useful but sometimes things will go in one way then get lost in my brain with me trying to figure out how to put it in my own words to understand it.

I learn best when shown something at first then copied, colour codes, charts, pictures, videos, brainstorming, graphs, just stuff kinda put out there for me to see and explore. I once had my ISTP friend (I pretty much have been trying to find his type with him by making him do tests and from a current mbti related test has said that his highest is ISTP and I can see similarities within that type and him) liked how I colour coded my timetable. :p (Usually not so organised but I try)

I like documentaries and do find that writing stuff down can help me but sometimes I can just write aimlessly if i'm not too keen on the subject so I need to have interest in the subject to be able to learn amazingly.

When playing an instrument I more would like to know the sound of what i'm playing, copy how the piece is played and play along with it, slow it down, play into little sections or as my music teacher puts it. "building blocks" I learn well with him because when I first had him he actually seemed interested to suit my learning style and asked how I learn in classes and notices the little things I do to play well.
 
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I generally learn in a couple different ways. For lectures and learning on the job, I take notes. Usually just the act of taking notes alone completes the learning, but sometimes I'll look back at them.

Reflection is a great way for me to learn after trying to apply knowledge. If the cliche "hindsight is 20/20" fits, might as well take advantage of it. Visual charts and graphs can help me learn, but usually in areas of leisure not work/school. For an example (and because why not) here's a video about maps: The population-centric ones are really fascinating.


Finally, trying to create systems helps me learn in a similar fashion to reflection, although I can't utilize those systems perfectly.
 

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I have to hear a lecture. I absorb a lot by hearing and writing. Visually presented information is less boring I guess, but not necessarily the must. I hate bland textbooks. It is not about pictures, but general feel about pictureless books that offer unimaginative and dry information. Of course, one needs a picture of a cell than can help learn about its structure. I can learn by myself, and it is unnecessary for me to have discussions with others. To memorize information quickly (I was quite good at that), I have to make sense of what I read and make my own notes and lists on sidelines of a textbook or in a notebook. I used to have quite strong memory and that was helpful a lot when taking the tests (I was quite good at that so that I did not need to know everything but just snippets of chapters and that help me during testing). I memorize a lot of information during a research of a topic much more than if I tried to rote memorize it. It is like an unconscious absorption of information while writing about it. I like to brainstorm when a problem is not straightforward ( a chemistry or a math problems are not always predictable - [thank you Ne] - sometimes my solution due to intuiting a problem is the right one). Also, I learn a lot at the last minute when I have the least time to do it; sudden urge of motivation and energy comes in. I am a chaotic learner like that. I find that when you come to the solution of something by yourself after struggling to find it, it is much more satisfying than when info is offered on the platter - that could quite boring. I hate to focus on just one thing. I feel guilty and dumb to just learn about one subject.
 
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I am auditory and kinesthetic. I'm possibly the least visual person I know.

As an adult learning professional I think about this subject every day. I design multimedia learning experiences that appeal to multiple senses, both because different people have different learning styles and also because research shows that people retain information and skills better when the learning process requires them to use multiple senses. I love this work.

I am not really good with words though. Much better with sounds and music or with learning a physical or athletic skill.
 
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