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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Type Sevens are one of the two narcissist types(I can't remember if it is 7 or 3 that is the "true" narcissist according to one author.). The way it manifests is said to be different from the type 3.

I've noticed it in myself in many ways strange and unlikely ways, but the most consistent is process i call "inflation".
Usually this happens after I've been at a low point. I'll slowly start inflating myself back up, a bit at a time. This could be gained from my perceived abilities, how people see me, my potential, or anything. eventually it reaches a baseline where I can operate well again and feel great.

This can go on to the point where someone or something comes and "bursts" me again and i start from scratch again. It's quite funny to look at objectively.

My type 3 friend is more physical in his narcissism. It is gained directly from feedback and perceived accomplishment, rather than perceived potential.
 

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Birdie Borracho
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Type Sevens are one of the two narcissist types(I can't remember if it is 7 or 3 that is the "true" narcissist according to one author.). The way it manifests is said to be different from the type 3.

My type 3 friend is more physical in his narcissism. It is gained directly from feedback and perceived accomplishment, rather than perceived potential.
I think enneagram type might be able to explain how narcissism manifest itself, but true cluster B narcissism affects any type. I believe high narcissistic tendencies, for 3 and 7, are likely to be compensatory. This could be a chip on the shoulder or a desire to want people to like us. The unhealthy aspect is when the desire to be novel or a part of the group outweighs our Ti (You identify as an ISTP). For myself, I used to have higher levels of narcissistic tendencies, but I came to the acceptance that I am not special nor entitled. I had a low self-esteem and I would want others to feed off my enthusiasm so that they would like me. Now I use it for myself as it is how I operate in society.

I think that our enthusiasm is used for both personal and group motivation, and definitely requires a healthy ego to succeed. For example, if I'm feeling lazy, I can muster the energy to get motivated and motivate the people in my group. From there, I like to maintain excitement as we work towards the goal. I recognize that others will not share the same enthusiasm, but being enthusiastic us how I, obviously, stay on task. My ego is driven to achieve, but I can separate the narcissism because my ego is not directly attached to the group's success or their validation of me. I believe a healthy enthusiast can separate their enthusiasm from their ego to see it more as a skill rather than sole identity.

I've noticed it in myself in many ways strange and unlikely ways, but the most consistent is process i call "inflation".
Usually this happens after I've been at a low point. I'll slowly start inflating myself back up, a bit at a time. This could be gained from my perceived abilities, how people see me, my potential, or anything. eventually it reaches a baseline where I can operate well again and feel great.

This can go on to the point where someone or something comes and "bursts" me again and i start from scratch again. It's quite funny to look at objectively.
Excitement can come and go and we do have to build ourselves back up again. I would not consider that narcissism, though. Narcissists are devoid of true empathy, plant seeds in others to harvest narc supply, twist situations to paint themselves as victims, find ways to make conversations about them, and genuinely view others as means to prop themselves up.

We might need to be enthusiastic and sometimes it might be self-serving. But there is a difference in being purposeful versus manipulating situations to satisfy an ego. Like I said, enthusiasm is a large part of our motivation. Being confident of abilities is not the same as being an empathy sucking predator.*

*(For context, my dad is a narcissist and I myself have little affective empathy. My criticism of narcissists is more objective analysis rather than a personal vendetta.)
 
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Sweet Matrimony.
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For me, I think mine manifests as, "you are literally irrelevant to my life in any way shape or form." Once I get to that stage with someone, it's easy to justify dismissing their feeilngs (however legitimate they may be) to things I do/say to them, especially if I'm being really mean.

It also manifests as "I don't really care about anyone else by myself right now." Sometimes it's protective, but most of the time it's just my natural baseline - I don't like to get bogged down in social niceties or expectations. I have an EXTREME need to be free to do whatever I please when I please it. So if someone is getting in my way in this sense, I'm likely to just completely and utterly ignore them and get on with things as planned. Another facet of this idiosyncracy is that I cannot tolerate people who try to dampen my high energy/spirits with their boring ways or even worse, their own sadness *shudders at the thought.* I usually prefer to avoid chronically sad people like the plague. They bore me. As selfish as that sounds, but I wouldn't be a type 7 if I weren't exceedingly selfish at times so :wink:

I'm the friend people hit up when they want to forget about their problems/worries/strife for a while and just have fun.... and I'd like to keep it that way. I can be sympathetic to people's plights, but for like 1/4th of the time of most other people. After my shallow well of sympathy runs dry, I literally stop giving fvcks.

*Also, I'd just like to point out there is a difference between being narcissistic and being a narcissist. A narcissist is one who suffers from the grandiose view of themselves. Someone who is being narcissistic is just displaying said traits but they might not necessarily suffer from the disorder.*

edit:
Ooo! Based on my admittedly shallow understanding of 3s, perhaps the difference between the narcissistic traits we manifest are as such:

7s - we don't care about other people because they are secondary to our quest to get our desires met. So we simply devalue people in general because we are gluttons and our focus is on our desires.

3s - they use people to get what they want. People are the main focus of their desires because people are objects to them, objects they use to compare and assess their own sense of self. There is more of a fixation on people in 3s than in 7s because 3s need the feedback of other people in order to know where they stand in terms of social standing.

But 7s don't need people at all. We lust and we consume because we want it. Sometimes we might lust over people, but I think this is rare. From my experience and all the reading I've done on 7s, we care more about the physical environment and bending it to fit our needs than we do about using the people in them -- especially when unhealthy. Basically, people are less central to the fulfillment of our desires than for 3s. So, by this viewpoint I would say 3s are "truer" narcissists than 7s.
 

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I agree with everything @DaphneDelRey said.

As a 7-3-9, I have the joy of experiencing a double-whammy of narcissistic characteristics. I tend to vascillate between "Get out of my way, I don't need any of you" and "Look at me! Look at me!"

I see my Sp instinct tied to the 7 and my So instinct tied to the 3. It's not enough for me just to go off and live life my way. I crave recognition for the things I've done/accomplished. I don't care about acceptance or belonging - I just need some acknowledgement when I do things outside the norm.
 
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