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Back in febuary, I had the idea of reading 100 books in a year after watching this video...


I do not think I will make it, I knew it was a big goal but I have used it as motivation to start reading again. I used to be a "book worm" always nose-first in a book 90% of the time but when I reached the end of high school I didn't read more than 3 books a year for 2 years as University just sapped all my time and energy. So this year I picked up books again alongside my studies. I started slow and had to wait for books to be brought into my local library so I had to learn to order multiple books before I finished one so I would have something to read if I finished faster than expected.

So far this year from Feb till now I have read 12 books and have 4 others lined up that I am looking forward to reading. :kitteh:

I think for 2020 I might go for 52 books in a year, that's 1 per week. I have a good list growing of things I will read eventually... any other recommendations are welcome. :wink:

Here is my list if anyone is interested.

To read…

Fiction - Fantasy - Adventure


Works by Robin Hobb

The Realm of the Elderlings

The Farseer Trilogy:
Assassin's Apprentice (1995) Royal Assassin (1996) Assassin's Quest (1997)

Liveship Traders Trilogy:
Ship of Magic (1998) The Mad Ship (1999) Ship of Destiny (2000)

The Tawny Man Trilogy:
Fool's Errand (2001) The Golden Fool (2002) Fool's Fate (2003)

The Rain Wild Chronicles:
Dragon Keeper (2009) Dragon Haven (2010) City of Dragons (2011) Blood of Dragons (2013)

The Fitz and the Fool Trilogy:
Fool's Assassin (2014) Fool's Quest (2015) Assassin's Fate (2017)



Miscellaneous:
Characters Locations Legends II
Soldier Son Trilogy
Shaman's Crossing (2005) Forest Mage (2006) Renegade's Magic (2008)

As Megan Lindholm:
Wizard of the Pigeons (1985) The Gypsy (1992)



Stieg Larsson:
Millennium- continuing girl who played with fire

Christopher Paolini:
the Fork, the Witch, and the Worm

Sue Burke:
Semiosis

Adrian Tchaikovsky
Children of Time

Frank Herbert
Dune

Katherine Dunn
Geek Love

Douglas Adams
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Kazuo Ishiguro
Never Let Me Go

Kurt Vonnegut
Slaughterhouse-Five: Or the Children's Crusade, a Duty-Dance With Death


Hilton Als
White Girls

Elif Batuman
The Idiot




History - Nonfiction – Serious

The Undiscovered Self: Answers to Questions Raised by the Present World Crisis
Book by Carl Jung


Mind Power John Kehoe


Robert Greene
Mastery, The 48 Laws of Power, and 33 Strategies of War.

N.K. Jemisin
The Broken Earth trilogy

Elizabeth Alexander
The Light of the World

Karl Ove Knausgaard
My Struggle: A Man in Love

Jeffrey Eugenides
Middlesex

Dave Eggers
The Circle

Haruki Murakami
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

Haruki Murakami,
Philip Gabriel (Translator)
Kafka on the Shore

Inazo Nitobe
Bushido: The Soul of Japan. A Classic Essay on Samurai Ethics

Miyamoto Musashi, Victor Harris
A Book of Five Rings: The Classic Guide to Strategy

Adolf Hitler
Mein Kampf

Yukio Mishima
The Temple of the Golden Pavillion

Sun Tzu
Thomas Cleary
The Art of War


Alexandre Dumas,Robin Buss
The Count of Monte Cristo

Bhikkhu Bodhi
In the Buddha's Words: An Anthology of Discourses from the Pali Canon


Gabriel García Márquez
One Hundred Years of Solitude

Roberto Bolaño
2666

bell hooks
All About Love: New Visions

The Aquarian Conspiracy by Marilyn Ferguson - Caution: contains optimism

Jung's Man and His Symbols

Jung's Synchronicity

Das Energi by Paul Williams

Quantum Reality: Beyond the New Physics by Nick Herbert

A hero with a thousand faces.

plato's republic

The Stranger (1942) and The Plague (1947).

barking up the wrong tree



more...

Midnight's Children, Salman Rushdie
Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood, Alexandra Fuller
The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business: Charles Duhigg
Thinking Fast and slow by Daniel Kahneman
How to Win Friends and Influence People a Book by Dale Carnegie
Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck
Never Let Me Go, Kazuo Ishiguro
Moll Flanders, Daniel Defoe
The Devil Wears Prada, Lauren Weisberger

The Green Mile, Stephen King
The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton
The Great Gatsby, F.Scott Fitzgerald
Gone with the Wind, Margaret Mitchell
To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath
Life of Pi, Yann Martel
Think and Grow Rich (Think and Grow Rich Series) by Hill, Napoleon
Rich Dad Poor Dad
The Prince- Niccolo Machiavelli
The Lean Startup: How Constant Innovation Creates Radically Successful Businesses
Sam Walton: Made In America
Frankenstein, Mary Shelley
The Beach, Alex Garland
The Time Traveler's Wife, Audrey Niffenegger
The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway
Memoirs of a Geisha, Arthur Golden
In the Lake of the Woods, Tim O'Brien
A Coffin for Dimitrios, Eric Ambler
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, Robert Pirsig
The Caine Mutiny, Herman Wouk
The Killer Angels, Michael Shaara
The Human Factor, Graham Greene
Tarzan of the Apes, Edgar Rice Burroughs
Paris Trout, Pete Dexter
The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck
Angle of Repose, Wallace Stegner
Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
Humboldt's Gift, Saul Bellow
A Passage to India, E.M. Forster
To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf
U.S.A. Trilogy, John Dos PassosHoward's End, E.M. Forster
The Killer Inside Me, Jim Thompson
The English Patient, Michael Ondaatje
Portnoy's Complaint, Philip Roth
Fabulous Small Jews, Joseph Epstein
Tender is the Night, F. Scott Fitzgerald
Roscoe, William Kennedy
Charming Billy, Alice McDermott
Lord of the Flies, William Golding
Razor's Edge, W. Somerset Maugham
Lying Awake, Mark Salzman
A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kennedy Toole
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Ken Kesey
Light Years, James Salter
Black Dogs, Ian McEwan
Spartina, John Casey
A Fan's Notes, Frederick Exley
Scoop, Evelyn Waugh
Blood of the Lamb, Peter De Vries
Empire Falls, Richard Russo
The Maltese Falcon, Dashiell Hammett
Double Indemnity, James Cain
The Sunlight Dialogues, John Gardner
The Ginger Man, J.P. Donleavy
Seize the Day, Saul Bellow
Rabbit Is Rich, John Updike
Deliverance, James Dickey
The Bird Artist, Howard Norman
City Boy, Herman Wouk
Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, John le Carre
Advise and Consent, Allen Drury
A Man in Full, Tom Wolfe
Sophie's Choice, William Styron
Breakfast of Champions, Kurt Vonnegut
The Godfather, Mario Puzo
A History of Love, Nicole Krauss
 
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Banned
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Maybe one. I want to read more but I can't focus on the words on the page, my attention always wanders.
 
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According to my Goodreads profile, I have read 65 books so far this year. This isn't my average amount as an adult, though. I think last year I probably read about 10, and that sounds about right for the previous few years as well.
 
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It's also important to pay attention to what author you read, or who is writing your book.

Certain writers have repressed emotions, which show up, or can be reflected, in the stories they write. This is not to say their stories are bad (which can actually be quite popular and hot-selling, like how the story of Harry Potter shows repressed Envy), just something to be aware of.
 

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I read anywhere from 20 to around 50 books a year. I read every single night to get to sleep and it's interesting to me that I retain such reading better than reading at other times. Reading keeps my mind off of snacking.

I read mostly non fiction and Scientific American and National Geographic are two magazines I read often cover to cover in terms of articles of interest and a lot of the current events blurbs. I would count that series, each, as 1 book per year (at least). In terms of diversity of subject matter they are among my favorites of all time.

I read a lot of philosophy and psychology.

I read science fiction and adventure for fun with a tiny Stephen King/Lovecraft toehold into horror. I have tried to read military or police thrillers or whodoneits and just cant get interested in them.

Recently the adventure genre has suffered from far too much main character pandering and departure from realistic setbacks and losses. George R R Martin actually re-interested me on that basis, but his tragic sellout to corporate idiocy has ruined his potentially epic resistance to the pandering trend. Sadly, the winter of my discontent is still coming.
 

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50 or more. I set my goal on Goodreads every year.
 
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Anywhere between 1-10 books (depending on the year) but I think that's because most of my reading has been replaced by online content. I wouldn't be surprised if the summation of the paragraphs I've read online in a single year is equal to dozen(s) of books. Not that everything I read online is useful information, but I've learned a great deal about many things by following silly whims on the internet.

I'm currently reading Game of Thrones, but I haven't finished it yet because Daenerys' chapters are so divorced from the main storyline that I usually take (long) breaks whenever I get to her chapters.
 

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I used to read upwards of 50 books a year, but now I read downwards of -50 books a year.
 

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I don’t even count them...

Makes me want to say, “All of them!”
:laughing::tongue:

So, it means many. :happy:
 

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I read anywhere from 20 to around 50 books a year. I read every single night to get to sleep and it's interesting to me that I retain such reading better than reading at other times. Reading keeps my mind off of snacking.

I read mostly non fiction and Scientific American and National Geographic are two magazines I read often cover to cover in terms of articles of interest and a lot of the current events blurbs. I would count that series, each, as 1 book per year (at least). In terms of diversity of subject matter they are among my favorites of all time.

I read a lot of philosophy and psychology.

I read science fiction and adventure for fun with a tiny Stephen King/Lovecraft toehold into horror. I have tried to read military or police thrillers or whodoneits and just cant get interested in them.

Recently the adventure genre has suffered from far too much main character pandering and departure from realistic setbacks and losses. George R R Martin actually re-interested me on that basis, but his tragic sellout to corporate idiocy has ruined his potentially epic resistance to the pandering trend. Sadly, the winter of my discontent is still coming.
I read all of “A Song of Fire and Ice” series. I bought a boxed gift set at a thrift store. “The Dance of Dragons”, I had to get separately but, also, at a thrift store. I didn’t pay much for them. They were fantastical, or so I think. Happy reading.
 

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I read all of “A Song of Fire and Ice” series. I bought a boxed gift set at a thrift store. “The Dance of Dragons”, I had to get separately but, also, at a thrift store. I didn’t pay much for them. They were fantastical, or so I think. Happy reading.
I do like Martin's writing. His business sense is horrid. His sell out to people that are not his equal in storytelling besmirched his art. Granted, the 'real' story of GoT continues in print, but a cold dragon colded down a cold wall, and a dragon who's rider was slain took revenge on a chair instead of her killer who was standing right there. Those stupidities can happen the right way in a well told story, but they did not, because the story was hijacked by people who told it poorly. Even if the swine pay you well, they will not know how to use the pearls you cast before them.
 
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I do like Martin's writing. His business sense is horrid. His sell out to people that are not his equal in storytelling besmirched his art. Granted, the 'real' story of GoT continues in print, but a cold dragon colded down a cold wall, and a dragon who's rider was slain took revenge on a chair instead of her killer who was standing right there. Those stupidities can happen the right way in a well told story, but they did not, because the story was hijacked by people who told it poorly. Even if the swine pay you well, they will not know how to use the pearls you cast before them.
I see your complaints.
 
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