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Hey guys.

After I got my psych degree, I really don't know if I want to go into grad school and all. Though I like the human interaction (one on one mostly because I'm quite introverted and would feel very uncomfortable giving talks in front of a class, etc) which therapy provides, I don't think I can handle hearing people's problems all day long. I also have a bit of a creative side to myself (writing poetry, etc). I am decent in math which you probably need to be to do computer science. The only thing that worries me is that I don't think very fast and I've seen these people typing away like machines and I'm like I don't know if I can do that all day....

Any of you guys do computers? How you finding it? Can you be creative? Do you get bored?

I know the money is good...or better than a therapist let's say, and for sure better than a poet!!

I figure if I go that route, I could work four days a week, make enough money not to worry about the bills, and spend the rest of the time doing more creative things. Of course, maybe the job can really provide that, and maybe I can work on a website, providing some psych info or something as a hobby. I don't know...I'm just daydreaming as I always do. Or I could volunteer that day....

Any help would be so very appreciated.

Peace. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I guess none. :unsure:
 

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I spend about a year doing computers, sitting in a cubicle. Money was good but I quit when I realized I couldn't be cooped up in a cold, impersonal environment. Now, years after leaving the company, I'm hearing many people left the company or got laid off in the worst recession in US history.
 

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i worked as a programmer all through high school, and then went to college for comp sci for about a year... eventually i decided it was something that i enjoyed, but not something i wanted to do all the time. it's the type of job that you can't leave at work... the unsolved problems are always swimming around in your head with you, and you just have to be in math/logic mode a lot.

so i dropped out of college, and just found simple work which made me much happier, despite barely getting paid. now, years later, i still mostly do simple stuff, warehouse work etc.. but lately i've been taking on a few programming projects here and there. it is definitely still fun for me, as long as it's only something i do every now and then. if i spend a few weeks doing nothing but coding at work i start to go a little stir crazy.
 

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I'm a game design major, so I do a lot of 3D and photoshop work along side of level design. Not so much programming, but we work with a lot of entertainment technology.
 

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Answer:
I'm not a computer science major, but I do computer security where we cover the fundamentals of computer science. I have been studying computers for about three years now, taking a one year break while in college because of a fluxed schedule. I am doing computers at this time because it's broad enough to cover good-paying jobs, as well as the possibility of going into graduate school for game-related design factors, such as music, analyzing programs. architectural designs, character design, level design, plot, you may see where I'm going with this.

When learning fundamentals, or re-studying them before an exam or something, or for whatever reason, fundamentals are boring to me. I'd rather learn about the tools of the trade I can use to help make my creative ideas come to life.

Whenever I get bored I turn to whatever I feel like doing while I'm not around the logic jungle. Bass guitar, pen and paper, creating gaming maps on places like Halo, drawing, learning to better (do hobby) so I can express myself more vividly...Of that nature. I may be rediscovering myself, but I know that this world needs compromise with it's gems with will-power in order to survive.

The why:

I'm in computers because I understand that my goals need me to be highly trained in order to be able to use these tools effectively. So I am meeting the system half-way, and I'm still who I am. I'm just working towards making them come true. :happy:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the responses guys.
 

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My INFP father has been computer science-ing for his entire life.
 

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Got my degree in Computing, I found the mathy/science part of it a little boring so skipped out on that! I'm currently working from home in e-commerce/web design/dev and it's ok I suppose. I love the "bigger-picture" aspects of the work (Design/Vision/Coding an idea), but when it comes to the overly detailed stuff (Data Entry/Adding final polish to something) I sometimes think I'd rather be stabbing my eyes out.

I think there's quite a large scope in the programming side of things for indulging your creativity. That's where having an imagination really comes in handy.

I did also work in IT tech support for a time, not that you need Comp Sci degree for that mind, but I found elements of that I enjoyed as well. I think a lot of that was derived from the helping others aspects of that role, perhaps aiding in feeling internally satisfied.
 

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Got my degree in Computing, I found the mathy/science part of it a little boring so skipped out on that! I'm currently working from home in e-commerce/web design/dev and it's ok I suppose. I love the "bigger-picture" aspects of the work (Design/Vision/Coding an idea), but when it comes to the overly detailed stuff (Data Entry/Adding final polish to something) I sometimes think I'd rather be stabbing my eyes out.

I think there's quite a large scope in the programming side of things for indulging your creativity. That's where having an imagination really comes in handy.

I did also work in IT tech support for a time, not that you need Comp Sci degree for that mind, but I found elements of that I enjoyed as well. I think a lot of that was derived from the helping others aspects of that role, perhaps aiding in feeling internally satisfied.
Interesting. I had been considering programming but figured it's god-awful tedious. All that attention to details, reviewing the thing a hundred times to figure out where you made a mistake, etc. I don't really know where the imagination comes into place. In addition, I like interacting with people albeit in a limited manner and one person at a time. Being stuck in my cubicle doesn't seem to be like that.
 

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Interesting. I had been considering programming but figured it's god-awful tedious. All that attention to details, reviewing the thing a hundred times to figure out where you made a mistake, etc. I don't really know where the imagination comes into place. In addition, I like interacting with people albeit in a limited manner and one person at a time. Being stuck in my cubicle doesn't seem to be like that.
I'd say I've always felt prototyping a solution to a problem allowed you to be creative in the programming sense. In that way coming up with a solution requires you to use your imagination to try to figure out the best way to solve the problem, or so that's how it always worked for me.

You are right in the attention to details aspect. The number of times I've felt like slamming my head against the wall because I left out a bracket or semi-colon... lol Perhaps programming full-time as a career is better suited to the more detail-orientated! I think because I do it in combination with other things it's probably not so bad.
 

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Wow, it seems I am replying more than 2 years after the last post, but I do work in IT; studied Computer Engg in college.
 

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I'm replying another 2 years later!

After graduating with my BA in Public Health Policy, I wanted to pursue a career with money, so I'm now studying for my MS in Computer Science.

I did front-end web development for 2 years at a software company.

The money was good, but I knew I wouldn't earn as much since I didn't have a formal degree, so that's why I went back to school.

There are tons of opportunities for creativity in the software industry, wherever you do decide to go.

As far as creativity goes, when I did web dev, I was best at transferring Photoshop high fidelity designs (from a female INTJ graphic designer) into a working website with all the effects. On top of my web development work, I did project planing/management and that's where I saw another side of creativity in this field. Being creative about the methods/tools/resources that we can use to create and ship a product within specific time constraints, a certain level of abilities among the workers involved, and collaborating with different groups was where I saw "creativity".

I guess it really depends on your definition of "creativity". In software, you can be creative in your specialty -- from being creative with creating efficient implementations of codes and also creating your own programs to working with designs into functional works to using creativity in finding ways to incorporate all the different levels of developers and designers to plan everything out.

Software is a beautiful industry and there are so many possibilities for creativity. It's not all programming and code grinding.

Also, in the 5 software jobs I've worked at so far, I never sat in a cubicle. So, fear not! :)

--

As far as school, I really have to work hard at it because all the logic and math doesn't really come naturally to me. Also all the detail and some abstract concepts can be pretty exhausting. I have to take mental breaks from all the studying since it makes me feel very drained.

I love learning it, but it's very frustrating when you get stuck or can't understand a concept. It's been cause for many sleepless nights sitting in front of my laptop with a cup of coffee typing away to finish projects.

It's challenging, but it's very rewarding. I like it as much as I like studying music because I feel like I'm learning languages that not everyone can learn. It's makes it seem very special, and there are always new things to learn. :)
 

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Oh wow, I didn't know so many INFPs did computer science/engineering!

I'm going to my 3rd year in computer engineering, still an undergraduate in university, and currently I'm on an internship :) It's fun to mess around with computers, and nothing beats the feeling you get in that moment when everything actually works! It's kind of really tough for an INFP (I guess - for me at least) to handle the 'all logic; no humanities' environment - which I feel really goes against the P - but I'm really fighting that by not restricting my life's work to just that area of knowledge/action. That is, I'm also planning and working on studying music and playing instruments, just to keep the F side intact :p
 

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I am a programmer. IT is not listed as recommended occupation for INFP, but I was sort of steered into it: after school I didn't lean toward anything, so my stepfather suggested I become a programmer.

I have learned to like it - the enthusiasm of people who love computers was contagious and rubbed off on me.
Also, I see writing code as art, sort of like composing.
Plus, understanding how the code works brings me out of the usual "worry about myself" mode, so it's a nice change fo pace :)

Also, I like how a computer will do what it's told, as long as I ask it correctly... can never guarantee this when dealing with people ;)
 

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It's kind of really tough for an INFP (I guess - for me at least) to handle the 'all logic; no humanities' environment - which I feel really goes against the P - but I'm really fighting that by not restricting my life's work to just that area of knowledge/action. That is, I'm also planning and working on studying music and playing instruments, just to keep the F side intact :p
I do the same too! I'm playing flute in the university band to keep me sane. Performing music is the only time I can get my mind off of all the intense logic and computation. :)

Also, I see writing code as art, sort of like composing.
I feel like if INFPs find a creative way of viewing our line of work -- rather than thinking of it as a boring desk job where you write code all day -- we will be able to push through that negative thought.

I like all the different programming languages we have available to learn. It feel like we're studying different languages and we can put ourselves into different environments depending on what language we're writing with!

Sometimes I feel like we're linguists in that sense. :D
 
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