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Do you love foreign languages?

  • I'm an INTJ, and I love foreign languages.

    Votes: 8 61.5%
  • I'm an INTJ, and don't really care much for foreign languages.

    Votes: 2 15.4%
  • I'm not an INTJ, but I love foreign languages too.

    Votes: 3 23.1%
  • I'm not an INTJ, and don't really care much for foreign languages.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
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Discussion Starter #1
What foreign languages do you speak, and do you have much of an interest in conlangs?

Have any of you invented your own conlangs?
 

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Being bilingual (Spanish/English) I found that many words don't change a lot when being translating like...
spoilers -> spoilers
no -> no
obscene -> obsceno
observant -> observante
However, I did play with language by changing the English letters into my unique shaping.
 

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I speak English and some German, understand Spanish pretty well, but I'm not a true language geek. However, my adult INTJ son definitely qualifies:

He speaks English, Spanish, and Arabic, and wants to learn Aramaic.
He invented his own spelling system for English.
He also learned Novial, and has been adding to it. Novial is a great constructed language by Walter Jesperson, and if you speak any of the European languages, easy to learn. I find his approach to the grammar really interesting.
 

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I'm not a language geek by any means i just learned english 'cause necessity and i tried russian , japanese and some indigenous just for fun.

Actually i like to listen birds nowdays and find some rhythmical patterns xD.
 

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I only speak English and my native language fluently but can read novels and newspapers in 8 languages. Additional to this I've learned the Russian, Arabic and Korean letters and can transliterate to English. It's also useful in Bulgaria, Serbia, Ukraine, Iran and Kurdistan/Northern Iraq.
My dad worked abroad during my childhood - Peru and Japan and my schools were in German and English so I've been exposed a lot to foreign languages. On top of this I've been a globetrotter visiting over 80% of the UN member nations.

Being bilingual (Spanish/English) I found that many words don't change a lot when being translating like...
spoilers -> spoilers
no -> no
obscene -> obsceno
observant -> observante
and...
embarrassed -> embarazada
 
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I have a weird obsession with foreign languages. All different kinds. New vocab is a Christmas present. I'm an Anki addict. It's also fun to listen in on a random foreign conversation. You can catch people saying some...interesting things sometimes. I've never actually traveled though.

I'm fluent in tard, moron, redneck, hilly billy and thug
Tard will get you far but you're wasting your time with thug, no offense...

Nerd.
 

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I have a weird obsession with foreign languages. All different kinds. New vocab is a Christmas present. I'm an Anki addict. It's also fun to listen in on a random foreign conversation. You can catch people saying some...interesting things sometimes. I've never actually traveled though.

Tard will get you far but you're wasting your time with thug, no offense...

Nerd.
yo so crae slobs
you be one o' dem Addidas
what it b like
this is gangsta v'bobs slippin
put'em in check blood:cool:
 

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I'm a language geek in a general sense. I like languages, I grew up "bilingual" (ASL and English) and I also took German and Spanish in high school, continued German through undergrad as a minor, and took a beginner's 7 week arabic language/culture course in undergrad as well. I really enjoy them.

I also really love learning about etimology of words, movement of language (e.g. how words are similar in different countries as language about certain things developed and moved through trade routes for example - I recently read an article on the word "tea" and "chai" and how the two words for tea developed and traveled through countries. I was delighted to read about it.), how words came to mean one thing or another (perhaps associated with something different than the original meaning), etc. But I'm not like...detailed remember all these facts about language type of person. I like to read it when I find it and am pleased but I don't seek it out.

So, depends on your definition of "geek". I'd say from an INTP perspective, probably not...INTPs geek on a whole other level ;P I did answer yes though.

Oh and zero interest in developing a conlang. Again, kind of that too much detail for my tastes thing. I don't really care to do that. It's fun to listen or hear about but I don't think I'd find much pleasure in structuring one out and setting up all the language rules and blah blah. lol
 

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I speak Portuguese and English, and I can understand a bit of Japanese and Spanish. And yes, I love languages, I love learning new words and getting to know how words are formed, used and connected in different ways.
 

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My twin INTP brother is much more so than I am. He’s super into language in a theoretical sense -linguistics, conlangs, that sort of thing.

However, I really like languages and I’m pretty gifted at picking them up. I’m really good at grammar and syntax. My vocab isn’t as good but that’s mostly because I’m a little lazy and trust my brain to recall most stuff without truly devoting the time to study it.

I’m American so obviously English is my native language, but I’m proficient in French and know a little German. I tested into German 2 to go on a trip this summer after studying it for about a week.

I can translate just about anything from Latin and my (classical) Greek is decent as well. I’m considering classics for a major or at least a minor in college. I’ll have more than 10 years of foreign language experience by the time I graduate high school this year.

I want to improve my German as I’m going there this summer for a three week school trip. I’d also like to get better at French. I’m also interested in picking up some Scandinavian languages.

Lately I’ve been watching some foreign shows on Netflix and have been really enjoying that. I’ve watched Dark (German), La Casa de Papel (Spanish), and Nobel (Norwegian). I really enjoyed improving what I knew and picking out similarities in the different languages -Norwegian and German are actually sort of similar, much more so than I would’ve thought.

Learning a few more languages is something I definitely want to do in my life. I’m considering international business as a career. I wish I was born in a country where people learned more than one language.
 

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I can translate just about anything from Latin and my (classical) Greek is decent as well. I’m considering classics for a major or at least a minor in college. I’ll have more than 10 years of foreign language experience by the time I graduate high school this year.
That's excellent -- it was a major undertaking to become proficient in Latin post-UG (the grammar, fine, two weeks cruise through Moreland and Fleischer, memorize all the forms quickly, and the vocabulary used in classical literature isn't very big [well, Vergil excepted, bunch of agricultural and animal husbandry stuff, but that's what those Ad usum Delphini are for], but, as you know, that's such a small part of appreciating the classical literature --> medieval or Renaissance Latin). I think the right time to learn Latin + the traditional "year of Gk" is in HS, so you don't have to deal with it later, like Ignatius at age thirty or forty or something sitting in with young children at some monastery. Don't mistake me, I'm not good enough to compose anything remotely good in Latin, but it's still a good one to fall back on.

A couple of very close buddies from the past ended up in grad programs in classics, and TBH, it sounded kind of like a snooze, compared to my field, Comparative Literature -- HOWEVER, you'll constantly be using Fr, German, probably Italian, at least, to read the secondary literature, so it probably will keep you on your toes. And, of course, Gk. I could see spending way too much time on the minor, but maybe you can segment your time better. TBH, I just did some stuff with Homeric dialect, and that not very well at all, just because I only have inclination to savor Homer, and can just look up the odd hapax legomenon, or use Andreas Divus as a crib.

A minor in Classics might be very fruitful as an UG -- if you haven't, check out William Harris's page hosted at Middlebury. Very amusing set of informal writings on topics from classical literature, languages (his field), and some other things.

For me, I don't have any more time for or interest in new languages -- I just pick up some street Spanish every now and then, maybe flick through some Russian headlines to make sure I haven't gone retarded and forgotten at least the alphabet. Mandarin was long ago abandoned, mainly because I have no interest in reading it, even in pinyin, just conversational. It was kind of fun picking up some Somali and Amharic from some guys at a little job a long time ago -- not enough to speak, just see what was what, trade a few pleasantries, that kind of thing. For not being Jewish, I enjoyed jiddische Sprache from pestering the parents of this girl I was seeing for a number of years whenever I saw them. Close enough to German to make some sense from the git-go, but different enough that I was glad to find a few real textbooks that set out some of the rules. Went through a brief phase of doing some Bangla writing and exploring some poetry of a friend of a friend from Calcutta and some small conversations, but that needed a dictionary, so that doesn't count for me. And I still need a dictionary for very literary German, so that's just a fact I live with, my secret shame.

No, I'm done with learning languages, I'll just stick to tard, hillbilly, and jackass fool in small but select handful. ETA That's not entirely true, I have a perma-hardon for some Italian movies, so while I only have basic conversation there, one ear is always hearing a little bit more, but not a topic of study. The grammar's fine, same as anything, but IMHO it's a grave mistake to think it's just "Latin++" in writing. Yeah, just sort of in the background, you get the gist, that's fine, add a little more subconsciously to the mental stack. But, no, I don't spend any time thinking about it, nor any language anymore, they're just stuff I use for various things.

ALTHOUGH, as a trying-to-be-born-again-hard computer scientist, formal language theory, CFGs, parse trees for modal and predicate logics, all sorts of automata, yeah, I think most people learn those once and sort of forget about them, but for me they're always humming along in the background. But that's the extent of my interest in linguistics as a subject.

AND, I sort of hate ConLang as a "movement," but one of the superior poets of our age, Christian Bök, taking his cue largely from the OuLiPo guys, has done impressive work with lipograms and other constraint-foreground literature (as well as, I think he made some money from inventing a Klingon language or something for one of those scifi things). Yeah, but in particular Fr literature, the concrete and formal abuse/constraint of language, by imposing constraints and exploiting homophony, and starting perhaps with Mallarmé, an emphasis on material, concrete language, and the highly fecund field of sound poetry, these tend towards a kind of conlang, but they're not in the same boat, really. One might include the L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poets, some of them, as participants intellectually, as well -- I'm not going to explain all that, but just trust me, it's there.
 

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Personally I love languages but do not really pursue a wide variety or delve too deeply.:concern: I am currently teaching myself Korean and Italian:yeah:. It's a bit of a slow and arduous process when you have no one IRL to help or even enthuse about languages with:nonchalance:. My partner is South African, I want to learn Afrikaans but they despise the language because of the history behind it. Conlangs are very intriguing, I haven't really looked into many but this thread has inspired me to explore of that realm. :tongue:
 

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no vote. i have mixed feelings about it, or mixed symptoms, and i don't know what they add up to. don't think there's any way you could call me a nerd. it's more like my general nerdery doesn't exclude languages. i'll take an interest if something abstract about a given language is put under my nose, but i wouldn't go off and pursue the actual learning of any language on my own time, just based on that.

for what it's worth, i've learned two to a pretty high level of fluency, and then let both of them lapse. so i suppose i have a superficial kind of talent for making the superficial stages of learning them go pretty quickly. don't know for sure though, since i've only been interested in learning those two. i can't imagine myself learning cantonese or hindi because i don't care about them.

and i don't much like dilettante approaches to languages anyway. soon as i've got the basics i want to start using it. i just don't see the point of learning 47 different ways of saying things that wouldn't be worth saying in my mother tongue. and ime actually getting a language to the point where you can genuinely communicate in it - that takes a lot more work and a lot more motivation, and i've only been interested enough to push it into that kind of zone twice.

NeonMidget said:
I want to learn Afrikaans but they despise the language because of the history behind it.


boer war or apartheid?
 

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[/COLOR]boer war or apartheid?[/QUOTE]

Apartheid. My partner is of the darker colour on the spectrum and takes it pretty personally.
 
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and i don't much like dilettante approaches to languages anyway. soon as i've got the basics i want to start using it. i just don't see the point of learning 47 different ways of saying things that wouldn't be worth saying in my mother tongue.
Yeah, that's basically my feeling as well -- to the extent I've used languages, including English, my maternal language, it's really for a specific use. Only care enough to do what I need.

It just happens that over the years I've needed more and more from a small handful in order to accomplish certain readings or pursue a line of thought, so things just sort of keep accumulating without really trying, at this point. Can't really escape it, even if I wanted to.

ETA On some "reflection," my above is not always true, in the one specific case that, in my interest in rooting out some habits that I'm unable to isolate or derange in English, I've taken to writing mostly in French, on, like Facebook writing to friends, private scribblings, all that informal, just chatter, no concern for anything except to shock my habits into finding a different path on the level of ideas (and, of course, multilingual puns, homophony, and stupid tricks like that). Of course, my inspiration for this is Samuel Beckett -- no, he's not my hero or anything, although I judge certain of his works as, if not superior, of considerable interest. However, true to what I said above, I write in French like I write in English -- basically, sloppy, kind of like an illiterate pig. Yeah, yeah, I know all the usage guides for English, French, I know how to do it proper, like make a nice little polished jack-off speech, but I think that's boring as shit. Language should be horrifying at times, messy, strange.

There's the nice contradiction that Mallarmé's short prose art pieces are at the same time held as examples of high art, and yet virtually no native speaker of French language just picks them up without scratching their heads -- they're fucking weird. Good, but strange. He's, someone has said, "a syntaxer [un syntaxier]."

So, that's the exception to my rule.
 

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I think I remember you, @Soul Kitchen. I like the language threads you've opened so far.

I myself don't think I am that big of a 'language geek'. I mean I find the study of language fascinating, I do, but I am also very lazy with regard to seriously taking it upon myself.

It’s true I understand (the major) latin languages, but that doesn't require much effort from my part, it's because of where I was born, meaning they sound like my own and I've been hearing them a lot (Spanish and Italian are by far the easiest languages I could learn) and I’m generally able to speak a few sentences in any of them, but I absolutely suck at Latin (sue me since my mother tongue was derived from it). At the moment I only speak French, English and my native language fluently, although I can make (more or less) petty mistakes in any of them.

However, apart from those, I taught myself to read Russian and Bulgarian, too (I was familiar with Cyrillic writing because I'd been seeing it in every church around here since I was very young). Studying Russian is my guilty pleasure. I want to get to that level where I’ll be able to read Dostoyevsky in his own language (I always get the sense English translations don't convey the Russian spirit of the Russian authors' characters as well as they should), but my vocabulary is still not that vast. I am also able to speak and read Japanese (not exactly an expert, more like at an intermediate level - since I haven’t been using it in a while I think my writing has become sloppy).

The only other language besides those that I have been meaning to start learning is Chinese, but I reckon ages will pass until I find the motivation to actually do it. Especially since I see the study of that language as a big commitment.

And that said, my favourite language is English, the first foreign language I've taken an interest in (and because of this I've studied literary works in Early Modern and Middle English too, but I stopped before getting into Old English because I found it hard to read - although I'd love to get into it some day). It’s the language I enjoy being creative with most. I even enjoy words that are deliberately misspelled in it. And accents, I am mad about them (I am quite decent at speaking in a Scottish accent and dialect because I love it). Oh, and my favourite poets write in English, and I enjoy reading them in original.
 
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